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Mathematical Sciences

Mathematics, statistics, and computer science attempt to describe the world we live in and our relationship to it. They are structural mechanisms providing context for speculation and discovery; important tools for illuminating theories and implementing techniques from other disciplines; and art forms exhibiting aesthetic values. They’re the mathematical sciences, and at Lewis & Clark they’re an integral part of a liberal arts education.

From Calculus and Differential Equations, to Theory of Computation, Computer Architecture and Assembly Languages, to Algorithm Design, Analysis and Combinatorics, our curriculum combines traditional concepts and classical principles with 21st century technologies and theories.

The Department of Mathematical Sciences offers three majors: mathematics; computer science and mathematics; and computer science. There are also two minors: one in mathematics and one in computer science. At the heart of the our curriculum is the development of conceptual and computational intuition, sophistication in the analysis of complicated structures and, most importantly, the interplay of these two with broadly based sets of technical skills and techniques.

Our facilities include two Unix computer lab/classrooms; the popular The Symbolic and Quantitative Resource Center, a drop-in resource center; the Student Study Room; and several seminar classrooms. Faculty are experts in their research areas, and they maintain an “open door” policy; students are encouraged to stop in to ask questions, discuss coursework, or just talk math.

Events

September 10th, 2014

  • 3:30pm - 4:30pm: Future behavior of some geometric evolution equations in math and General Relativity
    Adam Layne, LC grad 2010

    Differential equations arise naturally in physics problems as well as purely mathematical questions. Since these generally do not have nice solutions, the question becomes “What are solutions like?” Evolution equations that are geometric often have rather nice answers to this question. I’ll introduce asymptotics with some ordinary differential equations and then talk about some purely mathematical geometric evolution equations. I’ll end by describing the Einstein Field Equations which have their roots in general relativity, and some resolved questions about them, as well as some open problems.

September 13th, 2014

  • Image preview All Day: Annual Hike
    All students in a Math or CS class are invited to join the professors for a day hike in the Mt. Hood Wilderness area. BBQ dinner and games will follow at a professor’s mountain cabin.

September 17th, 2014

October 25th, 2014

  • Image preview 7:00pm: An Evening with Bill Nye the Science Guy

    Bill Nye — scientist, engineer, comedian, author, and inventor—will bring his special brand of pop culture science literacy to LC at the Pamplin Sports Center.

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