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Ethnic Studies

The discipline of Ethnic Studies emerged during the second half of the 20th century, as scholars began to question the Eurocentric model of academia in disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, and political science. By identifying these fields of study as important yet essentially flawed, the Ethnic Studies movement sought to reshape and expand the ways in which history, religion, language, and identity are studied and discussed in the classroom.

The Ethnic Studies Program at Lewis & Clark examines the social, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped cultural identity in the United States and around the globe.  In order to recognize the complex aspects of ethnic identity, our program focuses on five themes: 1) diaspora, 2) colonialism, 3) slavery, 4) genocide, and 5) community formation. We explore these and related topics from a variety of perspectives, always conscious of how they intersect with gender, sexuality, class, and nation.

Ethnic Studies is interdisciplinary by nature, and our faculty reflects this: sponsoring members come from departments including Foreign Languages, History, International Affairs, Music, Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology. Students can take courses in the arts, social sciences, and humanities, such as a World Music survey in the Music Department; the History Department’s course on modern Cuba; or Communications, Race, and Social Justice, offered by the Communications Department.  

Events

October 27th, 2014

  • Image preview 6:00pm - 8:00pm: Screening of Jose Antonio Vargas’ film, “Documented” and Panel

    In 2011, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in an essay published in the The New York Times Magazine.

    Documented chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his journey through America as an immigration reform activist; and his journey inward as he reconnects with his mother, whom he has not seen in person in over 20 years. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion and reception.

November 5th, 2014

  • Image preview 7:00pm: 93 Year Old Tuskegee Airmen Lt Col Alex Jefferson to Speak at Lewis & Clark College

    Lt. Col. Alexander Jefferson, is a 93 year old retired US Air Force officer, and one of the famous “Tuskegee Airmen”, also known as the 332nd Fighter Group.
    During World War II, Black Americans throughout the U.S. were subject to Jim Crow laws which legalized segregation and the American military was also segregated.
    President Truman signed an executive order ending segregation in the military in 1948 (3 years after the war’s end).

    Lt. Col. Jefferson’s book, “Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free: Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW”, is a personal memoir of those who served America in World War II and after. 

    Please join us for this very special opportunity. Lt Col Alexander Jefferson will speak from 7-8pm in the Chapel at Lewis & Clark College.  A book-signing and reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

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Ethnic Studies

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