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Ethnic Studies

 The Ethnic Studies Program examines the social, cultural, and the historical forces that have shaped cultural identity in the united states and around the globe. In order to Recognize the complex aspects of ethnic identity, our program focuses on five themes: 1) diaspora, 2) colonialism, 3) slavery, 4) genocide, and 5) community formation. We explore these and related topics from a variety of perspectives, always conscious of how they intersect with gender, sexuality, class, and nation.

Ethnic Studies Minor Requirements

The discipline of Ethnic Studies emerged during the second half of the 20th century, as scholars began to question the Eurocentric model of academia in disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, and political science. By identifying these fields of study as important yet essentially flawed, the Ethnic Studies movement sought to reshape and expand the ways in which history, religion, language, and identity are studied and discussed in the classroom.

Ethnic Studies is interdisciplinary by nature, and our faculty reflects this: sponsoring members come from departments including Foreign Languages, History, International Affairs, Music, Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology. Students can take courses in the arts, social sciences, and humanities, such as a World Music survey in the Music Department; the History Department’s course on modern Cuba; or Communications, Race, and Social Justice, offered by the Communications Department.  

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See this resource for diverse and multicultural students.


October 14th, 2015

  • Image preview 4:30pm: Fulbright Student Workshop
    Interested in applying for a Fulbright fellowship? Attend this presentation and workshop to learn more about the process.

October 18th, 2015

  • Image preview 12:00pm: Careers for Pioneers

    Join fellow alumni to share professional, life, and education experiences and advice! Lunch will be provided.

October 29th, 2015

  • Image preview 5:30pm: A Fiction Reading by John Treat
    John Whittier Treat, a native of New Haven, joined the Yale faculty in 1999 after teaching for eighteen years at the University of Washington, Berkeley, Stanford and Texas. He has been Professor Emeritus at Yale since 2014. He continues to teach courses in modern Japanese literature and criticism, and occasionally Korean studies and LGBT studies.  He has recently completed his first novel, The Rise and Fall of the Yellow House and is at work on a second, First Consonants.  This event is co-sponsored by the departments of English, History, and Gender Studies.
  • Image preview 6:00pm: Speakers Panel: The LAGRANT Foundation
    The LAGRANT Foundation’s mission is to increase the number of ethnic minorities in advertising, marketing and public relations. Hear advice from 3 panel speakers, ask questions, and network!

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Ethnic Studies

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