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Ethnic Studies

The discipline of Ethnic Studies emerged during the second half of the 20th century, as scholars began to question the Eurocentric model of academia in disciplines such as anthropology, sociology, and political science. By identifying these fields of study as important yet essentially flawed, the Ethnic Studies movement sought to reshape and expand the ways in which history, religion, language, and identity are studied and discussed in the classroom.

The Ethnic Studies Program at Lewis & Clark examines the social, cultural, and historical forces that have shaped cultural identity in the United States and around the globe.  In order to recognize the complex aspects of ethnic identity, our program focuses on five themes: 1) diaspora, 2) colonialism, 3) slavery, 4) genocide, and 5) community formation. We explore these and related topics from a variety of perspectives, always conscious of how they intersect with gender, sexuality, class, and nation.

Ethnic Studies is interdisciplinary by nature, and our faculty reflects this: sponsoring members come from departments including Foreign Languages, History, International Affairs, Music, Psychology, and Sociology/Anthropology. Students can take courses in the arts, social sciences, and humanities, such as a World Music survey in the Music Department; the History Department’s course on modern Cuba; or Communications, Race, and Social Justice, offered by the Communications Department.  

See this resource for diverse and multicultural students.

Events

January 20th, 2015

  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:00pm: Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration
    Lewis & Clark College students, staff, and faculty will do readings of Dr. King’s writings and speeches, paired with jazz music from Devin Phillips, a jazz musician from New Orleans.  Additionally, LC community members will share favorite and original works around this year’s theme: “We are the ones we have been waiting for.”

January 21st, 2015

January 22nd, 2015

  • Image preview 6:00pm - 7:30pm: From MLK to Michael Brown #blacklivesmatter A Social Justice Teach-in

    LC Community members with an advanced understanding of racial justice will participate in a Social Justice Teach-in, facilitated by local academics and activists (and activist academics).  The goal of the Teach-in is to increase individual knowledge and capacity to work for racial justice.

     

January 28th, 2015

February 4th, 2015

  • Image preview 7:00pm - 8:30pm: An Evening with Sister Helen Prejean and the 20th Anniversary of the film, “Dead Man Walking”
    Sister Helen Prejean has been instrumental in sparking national dialogue on the death penalty and helping to shape the Catholic Church’s newly vigorous opposition to state executions. She travels around the world giving talks about her ministry. She considers herself a southern storyteller.

    Sister Helen is a member of the Congregation of St. Joseph. She spent her first years with the Sisters teaching religion to junior high school students. Realizing that being on the side of poor people is an essential part of the Gospel she moved into the St. Thomas Housing Project in New Orleans and began working at Hope House from 1981 – 1984.

    During this time, she was asked to correspond with a death row inmate Patrick Sonnier at Angola. She agreed and became his spiritual adviser. After witnessing his execution, she wrote a book about the experience.
    The result was Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States.

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Ethnic Studies

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