School navigation

Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership

ELI Curriculum

Visit the Registrar’s Webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

 

ELI 101 Innovation: Systems-Thinking and Methods

Faculty: Dr. Brian Detweiler Bedell

Content: Examines the fundamentals of entrepreneurial thinking and activity through the lens of the liberal arts. Students will be introduced to the entrepreneurial skills needed to design and operate any venture, including understanding complex systems, recognizing opportunities, assessing customer need, identifying a viable business or funding model and market, and developing effective marketing strategies. Student performance will be evaluated through class participation and preparation, a number of short assignments, one exam, and a final term project and presentation.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 102 Idea Lab: Introduction to Design Thinking

Faculty: Michael Olich

Content: Introduction to the often messy and unpredictable process of developing solutions to user-focused problems. Students will work collaboratively within a project-based format to explore the rigors of innovative problem-solving. Topics range from entrepreneurial approaches to value creation and social transformation; course includes a weekly 90-minute lab session and provides a distinctively subjective, student-centered learning opportunity through immersion in need identification, ideation, and uncompromising experimentation.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 103 Leadership: Teams & Innovation

Faculty: Dr. Brian Detweiler Bedell

Content: Theories, research, and models of effective (as well as failed) leadership and teamwork. Students will complete a number of experiential projects to evaluate and develop their own leadership and teamwork skills. Leaders from corporate, startup, and nonprofit organizations will periodically join the class to discuss their experiences.
Prerequisites: None.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 244 Internship/Practicum

Faculty Supervisor: Brian Detweiler-Bedell

Content: Opportunities for students to engage in experiential learning by applying entrepreneurial thinking and academic concepts within for-profit and nonprofit organizations. May be repeated for credit. Students are encouraged to enroll in ELI 349, Internship Seminar, when available.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 1-4.

ELI 260 Sustainability & Entrepreneurship

Faculty: Amy Dvorak

Content: Introduction to current trends in efforts to address the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the 21st century. How for-profit and nonprofit entities, and innovative hybrids of the two, have begun to address modern problems and needs by supplying goods and services in new ways; the role of government in promoting sustainability through both traditional regulation and more innovative approaches; how market-dependent mechanisms such as product labels, private and public certification schemes, and investment and divestment strategies affect consumer behavior and public policy. A number of guest speakers will participate in classes over the course of the semester.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 261 Summer Internship in Sustainability

Content: Structured internship program in sustainability, including both a classroom and workplace component. Begins with a two-week introduction to issues in renewable energy, followed by a full-time internship placement. Students will continue to attend a once-weekly class on skill development in the workplace and the relationship between theory and practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, summer only.
Semester credits: 4

ELI 280 Communicating a Vision: Messaging for Impact

Faculty: Bryan Sebok

Content: Examines existing best practices in verbal communication, creative expression, and audio-visual presentation and production. Students will apply these practices in a series of exercises focused on individual and group communication, developing the ability to employ entrepreneurial thinking and principles to communicate innovative ideas to a variety of audiences. Projects include public speaking exercises, written and oral presentations tailored to different audiences, and audio-visual advertising and promotional content production. Case studies will be used to examine successful marketing campaigns for innovative products and services as well as alternative strategies and failures. We will emphasize habits and barriers to effective communication, strategies that promote creative expression, and how entrepreneurial methods empower successful messaging.
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 290 Technologies of the Future

Faculty: Kellar Autumn

Content: Through lectures, assigned readings, and hands-on activities, students learn about the parallel and synergistic processes of scientific discovery and engineering innovation. Open-ended projects give students experience in mutualistic teaming, technology transfer, product development, and marketing, as well as opportunities to learn and apply methods inherent in effectual entrepreneurial activities. Team-based laboratory projects focus on the process of technology transfer (utilizing scientific research in commercial product development).
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 5.

ELI 310 Curatorial Affairs in the Visual Arts

Faculty: Yaelle Amir

Content: Introduction and examination of issues surrounding the role of a contemporary art curator. The curator’s unique function in various venues—nonprofit, museum, gallery, academic institution—will be thoroughly explored to understand the ways in which space, resources, audience, and material impact their work. Students will meet with local curators and arts professionals, practice critical viewing and writing about art, study different exhibition-making strategies, and obtain hands-on experience in organizing an exhibition. Students must allow for travel time for field trips to different art venues in Portland, which take place throughout the semester during regular class time.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 345 Industry Practicum: Special Topic/Industry

Faculty Supervisor: Brian Detweiler-Bedell

Content: Organized practicum in a select industry, with strong academic, experiential, and preprofessional components. Past topics include screenwriting and brewing, with future anticipated topics to include real estate, the food industry, technology transfer, and investment management.
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 349 Innovation At Work: Internship & Seminar

Faculty: Meredith Goddard, Chrys Hutchings

Content: This course is an academic and experiential bridge between classroom theory and workplace application, building on concepts and skills developed in ELI 101, Innovation: Systems-Thinking and Methods (including recognizing opportunities, assessing customer need, identifying viable business models and markets, developing marketing strategies, and designing for-profit and nonprofit ventures). Students work eight to ten hours per week in a problem-based internship, acting as intrapreneurs to add value to their organizations. Additionally, students attend weekly class sessions evaluating personal their own strengths and weaknesses, gaining technical skills, and developing an opportunity analysis, solution landscape, and presentation for their organization. Students must submit a statement affirming their ability to participate in an off-campus internship; instructor consent required.
Prerequisites: ELI 101.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required. Students will need to secure transportation to off-campus internships.
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester.
Semester credits: 4.

 

 

Please note that course availability changes frequently. In case of discrepancies, WebAdvisor always takes precedence over schedules posted on this website.