ELI Curriculum

Visit the Registrar’s Webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

Courses offered spring 2022:

 

ELI 101 Innovation: Systems-Thinking and Methods

Faculty: Dr. Brian Detweiler Bedell

Content: Examines the fundamentals of entrepreneurial thinking and activity through the lens of the liberal arts. Students will be introduced to the entrepreneurial skills needed to design and operate any venture, including understanding complex systems, recognizing opportunities, assessing customer need, identifying a viable business or funding model and market, and developing effective marketing strategies. Student performance will be evaluated through class participation and preparation, a number of short assignments, one exam, and a final term project and presentation.
Prerequisites: None
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 102 Idea Lab: Introduction to Design Thinking

Faculty: Matt Rhoades

Content: Introduction to the often messy and unpredictable process of developing solutions to user-focused problems. Students will work collaboratively within a project-based format to explore the rigors of innovative problem-solving. Topics range from entrepreneurial approaches to value creation and social transformation; course includes a weekly 90-minute lab session and provides a distinctively subjective, student-centered learning opportunity through immersion in need identification, ideation, and uncompromising experimentation.
Prerequisites: None
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 103 Leadership: Teams & Innovation

Faculty: Dr. Brian Detweiler Bedell

Content: Theories, research, and models of effective (as well as failed) leadership and teamwork. Students will complete a number of experiential projects to evaluate and develop their own leadership and teamwork skills. Leaders from corporate, startup, and nonprofit organizations will periodically join the class to discuss their experiences.
Prerequisites: None
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 260 Sustainability & Entrepreneurship

Faculty: Amy Dvorak

Content: Introduction to current trends in efforts to address the environmental, social, and economic challenges of the 21st century. How for-profit and nonprofit entities, and innovative hybrids of the two, have begun to address modern problems and needs by supplying goods and services in new ways; the role of government in promoting sustainability through both traditional regulation and more innovative approaches; how market-dependent mechanisms such as product labels, private and public certification schemes, and investment and divestment strategies affect consumer behavior and public policy. A number of guest speakers will participate in classes over the course of the semester.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing required
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 261 Summer Internship in Sustainability

Faculty: Meredith Goddard and Amy Dvorak

Content: Structured internship program in sustainability, including both a classroom and workplace component. Begins with a two-week introduction to issues in renewable energy, followed by a full-time internship placement. Students will continue to attend a once-weekly class on skill development in the workplace and the relationship between theory and practice.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing required
Usually offered: Annually, summer only
Semester credits: 4

ELI 280 Communicating a Vision: Messaging for Impact

Faculty: Bryan Sebok

Content: Examines existing best practices in verbal communication, creative expression, and audio-visual presentation and production. Students will apply these practices in a series of exercises focused on individual and group communication, developing the ability to employ entrepreneurial thinking and principles to communicate innovative ideas to a variety of audiences. Projects include public speaking exercises, written and oral presentations tailored to different audiences, and audio-visual advertising and promotional content production. Case studies will be used to examine successful marketing campaigns for innovative products and services as well as alternative strategies and failures. We will emphasize habits and barriers to effective communication, strategies that promote creative expression, and how entrepreneurial methods empower successful messaging.
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 290 Technologies of the Future

Faculty: Kellar Autumn

Content: Through lectures, assigned readings, and hands-on activities, students learn about the parallel and synergistic processes of scientific discovery and engineering innovation. Open-ended projects give students experience in mutualistic teaming, technology transfer, product development, and marketing, as well as opportunities to learn and apply methods inherent in effectual entrepreneurial activities. Team-based laboratory projects focus on the process of technology transfer (utilizing scientific research in commercial product development).
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Usually offered: Annually, spring semester
Semester credits: 5

ELI 310 Curatorial Affairs in the Visual Arts

Faculty: Yaelle Amir

Content: Introduction and examination of issues surrounding the role of a contemporary art curator. The curator’s unique function in various venues—nonprofit, museum, gallery, academic institution—will be thoroughly explored to understand the ways in which space, resources, audience, and material impact their work. Students will meet with local curators and arts professionals, practice critical viewing and writing about art, study different exhibition-making strategies, and obtain hands-on experience in organizing an exhibition. Students must allow for travel time for field trips to different art venues in Portland, which take place throughout the semester during regular class time.
Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Usually offered: Annually, fall semester
Semester credits: 4

ELI 345 Industry Practicum: Special Topic/Industry

Faculty Supervisor: Brian Detweiler-Bedell

Content: Organized practicum in a select industry, with strong academic, experiential, and preprofessional components. Past topics include screenwriting and brewing, with future anticipated topics to include real estate, the food industry, technology transfer, and investment management.
Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102, or 103.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.
Usually offered: Annually, fall and spring semester. 
Semester credits: 4.

ELI 345 Screenwriting Practicum (spring class)

Faculty: Fernley Phillips

Content: Inspired by Lew Hunter’s acclaimed 434 MFA screenwriting class, this course is for students who wish to learn a professional approach to writing a screenplay. Predominantly a workshop, the goal is for each student to write a professional looking, first act of a feature length screenplay (approx 25-30 pages) and have an outline detailing the rest of the story by the end of the course.

Students will start at the basic conception stage before exploring the outlining process, learning how to break a story, develop an idea, create compelling characters and arcs, and craft an idea into a classical three act structure, before beginning the art of writing the script.

In addition to the workshop component, the class will combine elements of lecture, discussion, screenplay analysis and the viewing of pre-existing films and special guests.

Course is taught by Fernley Phillips, writer and co-producer of THE NUMBER 23 (directed by Joel Schumacher, starring Jim Carrey). Previously, Mr. Phillips taught screenwriting in UCLA’s Professional Program, and as a graduate student he won 1st Place for Best Original Screenplay in the UCLA Screenwriting Competition. Mr. Phillips remains an active writer and currently has several film and TV projects in development.

Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102 or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. Please email Fernley Phillips to request permission.

ELI 345 Film Production Practicum (fall class)

Faculty: Alissa Ferguson Phillips

Content:  Filmmaking is a collaborative endeavor, but there’s only one position that picks up the final Academy Award for “Best Picture” and this is the Producer. This class will explore what it means to be a creative Film Producer and how one becomes the capital “P.” We will watch a lot of contemporary films, current screenplays, and learn about how filmmaking works from the inside, both in terms of studio and independent production. We will cover development, prep, production, post, budgeting, crew, distribution, marketing and film financing. We’ll also cover contemporary directors, screenwriters and actors and how they interface with producers. This is an advanced film production course, students should have a strong interest in film and an extensive working knowledge of pop culture and media.

Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102 or 103 - Prerequisite will be waived for students with a demonstrated interest in the film and television industry.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required. 
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. Please email Brian Detweiler-Bedell to request permission.

ELI 345  Music Industry Practicum

Faculty: Rebecca Jordan Smith

Content: This course provides an opportunity to explore firsthand how the music industry works. While studying historical and contemporary practices, students will create original projects and examine and participate in the full potential life cycle of a record release in small collaborative groups. Students will be faced with decisions to make and actions to take at each stage of their project’s life cycle, to help them better understand the practical application of business concepts presented in readings, videos and lectures. We will consider the short- and long-term impacts of decision making from the perspective of both the artist and the business team representing the artist’s interests (manager, record label, music publisher, etc.). Via weekly assignments, students will present a course of action to the entire group to invite feedback and discussion. We will also be visited by at least two music industry guests and experience an in-person or virtual tour of a local recording studio.

About the instructor: Rebecca Jordan Smith began her career in the music industry as a recording artist signed to Elektra Records and Clive Davis’ J Records. She toured nationally with Matchbox 20, Third Eye Blind and Lilith Fair. Learn more about the instructor here.

Prerequisites: Eli 101, 102 or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. Please email Rebecca Jordan Smith to request permission

ELI 345 Marketing Leadership Practicum 

Faculty: Amanda Hill + Heidi Brown 

Content: Entrepreneurs are not risk takers as much as they are decision makers who use customer data well. Marketing is one of the most important, dynamic and proactive parts of any organization and the key interface with the most valuable asset a company has - Its customer. Marketers are fixated with understanding consumer’s needs, desires, wants, trade-offs and even anticipating what they don’t know they want yet, all with the aim of transforming this insight into creating competitive products or services that out-maneuver the competition.

This is a two part class with the first half learning marketing fundamentals and the second half learning digital marketing strategy.

Through this course, students will develop a broad understanding of the importance and complexity of major issues and challenges in today’s marketing world, analyse the marketing strategies for both start-up and incumbent organisations through real world and live case studies, help guide an organization through the maze of disruption as experienced in today’s competitive environment, and equally grasp the importance of corporate citizenship and social good.

Building on the first half of the class and the role of consumer data and insights in driving business value, the second half of the class will train students in the fundamentals of social media/digital marketing strategy. This includes customer acquisition, engagement and monetizing directly through social media. Our goal is that any student who succeeds in this section of the class will be equipped to implement digital strategy for their venture and/or qualified to apply for an entry level digital marketing/social media position.

About the instructor Amanda Hill:  Amanda is the co-founder and CEO of We Are On Purpose, a strategy and marketing consultancy with a mission of we believe doing good is good for business and good for the world. Amanda is a highly experienced board-level executive, recognized as a change agent who has focused not only on building creative and commercial excellence through a dedication to purpose, but also through the power of people and diversity of teams to innovate and execute at the highest level.

Amanda has worked primarily in media for the past 17 years, founded BBC Earth and spearheaded its development into a global brand reaching >1bn around the world. Following on from BBC Earth, Amanda became the first global CMO for BBC Worldwide/Studios where she was responsible for developing the BBC brand strategy and global brand portfolio internationally.

Amanda latterly served as Global CMO for A&E Networks in New York, prior to joining Harrods as its first Chief Marketing and Customer Officer.

In addition to being an adjunct lecturer and teacher of record in Marketing at Lewis & Clark, Amanda is on the board of Catlin Cable, the Wildstar Academy, Don’t Mind Me and The Listening Planet Foundation. Amanda also serves on the Advisory Board of The London Philharmonic.

About the instructor Heidi Brown: Heidi Brown is an international marketing lead with 15+ years experience. Specializing in digital and product marketing for technology companies, Heidi has worked with Domuso, Pipedrive, Nynja, Harry & David, Pushly, Vuukle, Puma, and UCLA. She is currently the Head of Marketing at MatchTune in Paris, France.

Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102 or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. 

 

ELI 345 Wealth Management 

Faculty: Noel Johnson

Content: Money. It is an important, confusing and big topic. Join an examination of it that leverages and applies the knowledge you have gained across your years of education. We plan to use “standard” school topics as our means to reveal applied insights with our goal being to empower confident optimists like you! From tangible and intangible currencies or assets, to investing and managing money, to misperceptions and cultural differences, we will identify and practice key skills you to be comparatively more capable. We will connect the dots across personal, business and society to give you tools and methodologies to tackle the trade-offs you may face and the systems you’ll need to navigate. Anyone can be an entrepreneur, or harness such a mindset to be a change-maker (our world needs you to!) Join us…

About the instructor: Noel is a real estate developer, consultant and nonprofit leader. His real estate experience spans more than $1B of investment activity across more than 20 developments. Noel’s consulting work serves both for and nonprofit private sector clients tackling built-environment and business evolution challenges. Noel also leads our region’s primary cross country sking venue and programatic provider, Teacup Nordic. Noel holds graduate degrees from Stanford Business School and Portland State University; he attended Williams College for undergrad. Born in Minnesota, he loves exploring Oregon’s beauty on skis, bikes & kayaks.

Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102 or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. 

ELI 345 Project Management

Faculty: Jan Sturdevant

Content: In an era of rapid social change, brutal competition, and thinning profits, project management is in every aspect of our world. It helps us interface with customers, support design and testing of new products, automate routine administrative and accounting functions, track inventories, and even facilitate collaborative project development in virtual teams.

This course moves you into the world of a project manager. It is built on integrating your project management knowledge of the fundamentals and basic principles grounded in Project Management Institute. Using real world case studies as well as you optionally developing your own project, we will act as project managers … not implementing nor designing, but rather determining what work and tasks need to be completed by the project team to introduce a new product to market while meeting supply chain life cycle deliverables. The course incorporates the knowledge areas of Project Management as defined by the Project Management Institute’s “Project Management Body of Knowledge” (PMBOK).

Prerequisites: ELI 101, 102 or 103
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required
Semester credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. 

 

ELI 349 Innovation At Work: Internship & Seminar

Faculty: Meredith Goddard, Chrys Hutchings

Content: This course is an academic and experiential bridge between classroom theory and workplace application, building on concepts and skills developed in ELI 101, Innovation: Systems-Thinking and Methods (including recognizing opportunities, assessing customer need, identifying viable business models and markets, developing marketing strategies, and designing for-profit and nonprofit ventures). Students work eight to ten hours per week in a problem-based internship, acting as intrapreneurs to add value to their organizations. Additionally, students attend weekly class sessions evaluating personal their own strengths and weaknesses, gaining technical skills, and developing an opportunity analysis, solution landscape, and presentation for their organization. Students must submit a statement affirming their ability to participate in an off-campus internship; instructor consent required.

Prerequisites: ELI 101
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required. Students will need to secure transportation to off-campus internships
Semester Credits: 4
This course requires instructor permission to register. Please email Meredith Goddard and Chrys Hutchings to request permission. 

HIST 390 Immigration and Asylum Law

Faculty: Elliott Young

Content: Introduces students to immigration and asylum law in the United States. Students will work with instructor on several asylum cases for which instructor serves as expert witness for country conditions. Countries we cover include Mexico, Guatemala, Honduras, El Salvador, and Venezuela. Asylum claims cover a variety of topics, including political persecution, drug cartel and gang violence, sexual violence, and gender and sexual orientation-based discrimination. Guest speakers will include immigration lawyers, immigration advocates, and immigration law professors. Students will apply liberal-arts research and writing skills to draft declarations for asylum petitioners, and they will work in teams on several cases during the semester, participating in intake interviews with clients to hearings before an immigration judge.

Prerequisites: None
Usually offered: Alternate Years, spring semester. 
Semester Credits: 4

 

 

Please note that course availability changes frequently. In case of discrepancies, WebAdvisor always takes precedence over schedules posted on this website.