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  • Stanley J. Prager BS ’53, May 2, 2018, age 90. After serving in World War II, Prager graduated from Lewis & Clark and went on to earn a master’s degree in teaching from Portland State University. His teaching career spanned 30 years, and he retired in 1989. Survivors include his wife, Kathryn, and many loving family members and friends.

  • Robert H. Snider BS ’63, April 6, 2017, age 77.

  • William S. MacKay BS ’62, April, 2018. MacKay practiced law for 15 years in San Francisco, where he specialized in antitrust law. In 1983, he moved in order to take care of his mother as she grew older. Survivors include his brother, Ted, and five nephews and nieces.

  • Shirley A. Jewel BS ’54, February 22, 2018, age 90. After graduation, Jewel and her husband lived in Petaluma, California, where she worked as a medical technologist. Jewel volunteered as a driver for cancer patients and as a caretaker for animals that were homeless or in need of rehabilitation. She also loved bird-watching and reading. Survivors include husband Raymond; children Marguerite, Carolyn, Matthew, Mark, and Geoffrey; and four grandchildren.

    • 02/15/2017

      Susanne Kahler BA ’82 retired from Loudoun County (Virginia) Public Schools and is the new program manager of the membership department at SkillsUSA, a nonprofit organization focusing on career and technical education and closing the skills gap.

    • 10/14/2016

      Susanne Brown Kahler BA ’82 left her position at Loudoun County Public Schools and is now program manager of member services and the office of education for SkillsUSA, a “nonprofit partnership of students, teachers, and industry working together to ensure America has a skilled workforce.” Kahler has also been working extensively as a group leader with the Experiment in International Living, which organizes experiential summer abroad programs. She currently resides in Leesburg, Virginia.

    • 02/01/2018

      Eric Atcheson BA ’08 recently stepped down as pastor of First Christian Church in Longview, Washington, after more than six years of service. He is continuing his doctor of ministry studies at Seattle University. His book, Oregon Trail Theology: The Frontier Millennial Christians Face—And How We’re Ready, is slated for release in fall 2018 by the publishing arm of the Episcopalian Church.

    • 10/09/2017

      Eric Atcheson BA ’08 recently signed a contract for his first book, Oregon Trail Theology: The Frontier Millennial Christians Face–And How We’re Ready. It is tentatively slated for distribution in fall 2018 by the publishing arm of the Episcopalian Church. He continues in his work as pastor of First Christian Church in Longview, Washington, and as a doctor of ministry candidate at Seattle University’s School of Theology and Ministry.

    • 09/17/2018

      April Nelson BA ’78, JD ’81 retired from legal practice in 2004 after working with several legal education organizations before transferring to private practice and becoming a partner at a firm in Delaware, Ohio. Nelson then went on to develop several special projects, including the Delaware Municipal Court’s mental health docket. Currently, she serves as a staff mediator for the Delaware County Juvenile and Probate Courts and works with families to develop plans to improve school attendance for students. Nelson is the recipient of numerous community awards, including the Delaware Area Chamber of Commerce Citizen of the Year Award, United Way Nancy Frankenberg Award for Community Volunteerism, and the United Way of Delaware County Lifetime Achievement Award, which was renamed in her honor.

    • The Brightest Sun

      Adrienne Benson BA ’92 authors The Brightest Sun, her debut novel, which follows the lives of three very different women who grapple with motherhood, recalibrate their identities, and confront unforeseen tragedies and triumphs. Leona, an isolated American anthropologist, gives birth to a baby girl in a remote Maasai village and must decide how she can be a mother in spite of her own grim childhood. Jane, a lonely expat wife, follows her husband to the tropics and learns just how fragile life is. And Simi, a barren Maasai woman, must confront her infertility in a society in which females are valued by their reproductive roles. Park Row, 2017. 336 pages.

      Posted 04/29/2018
    • 02/21/2018

      Katy Davidson BA ’99, singer and guitarist for the band Dear Nora, spoke to AdHoc magazine about their favorite songs from throughout their career. Although Dear Nora disbanded in 2008, the group played a reunion show after a well-received re-release of the band’s album, Mountain Rock. Davidson is also known for their work with the bands Key Losers and Lloyd & Michael.

    • 05/18/2018

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49 writes: “I must say that life is good here in Oro Valley, Arizona. I’m still playing in two large jazz bands, which rehearse weekly and play one or two gigs monthly. I also play in a very busy trad-jazz band (The Dixiecats). My Northwest group, the Harbor Patrol Jazz Band, was booked once again for the Clark County Fair for six days in August 2018. This was our 23rd consecutive year at that fair. We must be doing something right. Playing trumpet in creative jazz groups makes life really interesting and enjoyable, and in this 94th year of my life, my health could not be better, walking about a mile daily and doing the gym five times each week. My former wife died last December at age 93, and my present wife of 34 years, Carroll, is a delight. How could life be better for a nonagenarian? My best to you all.”

    • 02/13/2018

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49 writes that he would “be delighted to be there [at Alumni Weekend], joking and toasting my classmates graduating from L&C in June 1948 and June 1949. Unfortunately, I am committed to attend the reunion of the Panther Veteran’s Association in Jacksonville, Florida, at that same time. This veteran’s association is formed from those of us who served (and survived) in the 66th Infantry Division in World War II. Our service was chasing the Germans out of France, across Bavaria and into Austria. It’s a very special group in that last year there were only 16 of us WWII veterans left from the 14,000 who served; however, there were 267 next-generation relatives who made it fantastic. We spawned neat kids. I look back with great admiration to my two and one half years on our beautiful campus.”

    • 06/25/2017

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49, a WWII veteran and one of 15 surviving members of the 66th Infantry Division, attended the group’s annual reunion in Louisville, Kentucky, in summer 2017. Reitz says he’s been attending since the events started in 1969, and he’s only missed one. Reitz worked with radio equipment during the war, and was on deck when the SS  Leopoldville, the ship carrying his division to reinforce soldiers at the Battle of the Bulge, was hit by a German torpedo. Reitz was lucky enough to be able to swim to safety, but 800 service members were lost that day. He says “the traditions and the friendships” are what keep him coming back for reunions.

    • 12/12/2016

      John Reitz BS ’48, BM ’49, who invigorated the Snack Shack that once existed below Albany Quadrangle with jazz music, continues to play trumpet. Reitz, along with his Harbor Patrol Jazz Band, performed at the Clark County Fair in Vancouver, Washington, in August. It was the 20th consecutive year the band had played at the event.

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