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Media Guidance for Campus Events

Lewis & Clark is a private institution, and as such has the ability to determine who is and is not allowed on our property.  While Lewis & Clark reserves the right to excuse people from campus for any reason, in practice we keep the campus open to friends and family of community members, to neighbors walking through, and to others wanting to enjoy our space.  

Lewis & Clark College respects and supports the rights of journalists, including student journalists, and places a high value on the civil discourse and transparency that can stem from it.  

At the same time, Lewis & Clark also recognizes that some individuals and groups may want to keep private or limit the exposure of their words, images, or art to a specific audience.  While Lewis & Clark can aid in that protection, those persons should be advised that privacy is not guaranteed and often difficult to enforce.  

The information provided below is guidance, and unless otherwise stated, should not be considered policy.  

  1. What is the difference between a public and a private event?

    1. A public event is an event that is open to the wider public beyond just the Lewis & Clark community.  The event may be advertised in a variety of ways, and attendance cannot be limited, nor can the press be barred.  

    2. A private event can be put on by an individual, private group, college entity (department or office), or student organization.  Individuals and private groups may also include outside entities that are contracting with Lewis & Clark for use of campus space.  The event may be promoted in a variety of ways, and attendance must be limited in some way (committee/organization/office members, Lewis & Clark students or community members, RAs. etc); no event, whether public or private, may exclude attendees on a protected class basis.  The host of a private event may choose to bar members of the press/media.  

    3. See the chart below for more detailed distinction between public and private events.

Reserving Entity?

Closed or Open Event?

Nature of Admission?

Limit on Attendees?

Ability to Bar Media**?

Individual/Private Group

Closed Event

Not publicized – invitation only

Yes – as a closed private event

May bar media*

Individual/Private Group

Closed Event

Publicized through campus postings or public social media

Depends; may encourage supportive attendees, but if publicized, may not exclude attendees on protected category basis

May bar media*

Individual/Private Group

Open Event

Publicized through campus postings or public social media

Depends; may encourage supportive attendees, but if publicized, may not exclude attendees on protected category basis

May bar media*

College Entity (department, or office) or Student Organization

Closed Event

Admission criteria exist — event may be limited to members, those with tickets, staff, etc.

Attendance must be limited in some way. May limit attendance to members, board, or staff only, but may not exclude attendees on protected category basis, except in the case of a support group meeting (e.g., organized for clinical or therapeutic purposes).

May bar media*

College Entity (department, or office) or Student Organization

Open Event

Open to the public

Open to all

May not bar media

*Note: if the member of the media is a student, who would otherwise be allowed entrance, are one in the same, then they cannot be excluded from the event.

**Media includes those who are acting in a journalistic capacity.  See question 6.

  1. Who can invite speakers or put on performances?

    1. Lewis & Clark’s Freedom of Expression and Academic Inquiry Policy states: “Public performances and presentations must be hosted by recognized campus groups. These groups must follow College procedures for the scheduling of speakers and other programs and assume the responsibility that the event and its conduct are appropriate to the academic community. Hosting an event does not imply approval or endorsement of the views expressed by the hosting group or the College.”

  2. Can Lewis & Clark community members record or take photos without first asking permission at an event?

    1. No.  Lewis & Clark’s Recording Policy states: “It is expected that faculty, students, and staff will respect the privacy of other individuals in the workplace and educational setting. Consequently, the secret recording (audio or video) of classes, meetings, or other conversations, including telephone calls, is prohibited, as not compatible with the law or the promotion of an open exchange of ideas. Recordings may serve many legitimate academic and workplace purposes. However, the College does not condone recording of any College activities when participants are unaware that such recordings are being made. In order to promote an environment of trust and collegiality, recordings may be made only with the prior consent of the parties involved. Covert/secret recording of any in-person or telephone conversation or meeting occurring at the workplace, including any classroom or other educational setting, or conversations or meetings off site that deal with workplace or educational matters is prohibited. Employees are also prohibited from arranging for others to record conversations, telephone calls or other work or educational activities, unless specifically permitted by the participants.”

    2. This policy applies in all cases, regardless of whether the event is public or private.  

  3. Do Pioneer Log reporters have to identify themselves?  Do reporters from other press institutions have to identify themselves?

    1. Pioneer Log reporters should identify themselves, as part of ethical and professional journalistic practices while they are acting in their capacity as reporters.  However, Lewis & Clark does not have a policy that requires them to do so.  However, as members of the Lewis & Clark community, they are prohibited from recording fellow members of the community without making parties involved aware of the recording.  

    2. You may read more about the Pioneer Log’s Code of Ethics on their website.  

    3. The same follows for members of other press institutions — they should identify themselves, and most of them will, but they are not necessarily required to do so.  

  4. To what extent can Pioneer Log reporters or others take quotations from public or private social media without consent?  Does the privacy settings of the group/page have any bearing on what is allowed?

    1. Legally, a reporter would not be in a position of liability for reproducing the quote of someone else, with possible exception around a reporter adopting, commenting on, or otherwise adding to or modifying another’s statement such that it becomes the reporter’s own statement (and liability).

    2. Social media is a public space.  And public pages are just that, public. Taking quotes from private pages could present a greater challenge, depending on how access is obtained (e.g., by deception/hacking), and could be a violation of Oregon law and/or the College’s Student Code. If someone gets access to a private page from someone else who has access, however, there is little recourse against the reporter. In most situations, it would be difficult to impossible to establish that the access was unlawfully obtained.

  5. Who are considered members of the media?

    1. Media include anyone acting in a journalistic capacity, which can included full time reporters and journalists, student journalists, or anyone who takes actions to broadcast the event to a wider audience, including posting on social media.

    2. Lewis & Clark students who attend an event as part of an academic exercise for which they are earning credit are not considered members of the media. However, they should respect the privacy wishes of the host of the event in the creation and distribution of any related academic product.