• <a href="/live/image/gid/647/width/650/86678_Words_and_Numbers.jpg" class="lw_preview_image lw_disable_preview" tabindex="-1"><picture class="lw_image lw_image86678"> <source type="image/webp" srcset="/live/image/gid/647/width/720/height/690/crop/1/86678_Words_and_Numbers.rev.1610665810.webp 1x"/> <source type="image/jpeg" srcset="/live/image/gid/647/width/720/height/690/crop/1/86678_Words_and_Numbers.rev.1610665810.jpg 1x"/> <img src="/live/image/gid/647/width/720/height/690/crop/1/86678_Words_and_Numbers.rev.1610665810.jpg" alt="Numbers teaches students to interpret quantitative information presented in various forms and con..." width="720" height="690" data-max-w="932" data-max-h="932" loading="lazy"/> </picture> </a><div class="hero-split_image_caption collapsable-caption"><em>Numbers</em> teaches students to interpret quantitative information presented in various forms and contexts.</div>

At Lewis & Clark, you’ll take one faculty-led foundational seminar per semester. These small classes (19–25 students) are designed to help you develop the reading, writing, discussion, and analytical skills you will need to succeed in college and for life. One of your two courses will focus on interpreting the meaning and significance of texts (CORE 120: Words), the other on interpreting quantitative information and models (CORE 121: Numbers). These are not simply writing and math classes; rather, these courses allow you to explore a specialized topic of particular interest with a faculty member and a small group of students.

Words teaches students to explore the meaning and significance of texts via close reading and analysis, and to express that analysis in writing.

Numbers teaches students to interpret quantitative information presented in various forms and contexts; to understand the logical structure of quantitative arguments; and to use quantitative models, theories, and data to simplify, explain, and make predictions.


  • My favorite class has been Ancient Cities with Professor Joel Sweek. The class had the kind of academic rigor and seriousness that I hoped to find in college, and Professor Sweek’s lectures pushed me to think like a historian. I was left in awe of the ancient world and inspired to declare history as my major.

    Mateo Kaiser BA ’23
    Mountain View, California
    More about Mateo
  • IME has allowed me to create many meaningful connections with my peers and faculty on campus and has ultimately provided me with the opportunity to spread happiness.

    Matthew Telles BA ’21
    Denver, Colorado
    More about Matthew