Past Events

Steven Stroud
April 13, 2022

From Being a Human to Becoming Humane: The Personal Story of a Former White Nationalist

Steven Stroud is a former skinhead who has spent his adult life working against white supremacy and the prison-industrial complex. Please come hear his incredible story of personal transformation.
cropped THE STARRY ROAD TO FREEDOM bright blue
April 11, 2022

The Starry Road to Freedom: A Story of Frederick Douglass

On Monday, April 11th, Darius Wallace will present a Frederick Douglass monologue The Starry Road to Freedom in Evans Auditorium beginning at 4:30, followed by a Q & A ending at 5:45pm.  This event is sponsored by General Education with contributions by English, Theatre, Music, and Arts@LC.  This is an in person event.  Attendees are required to wear face masks. It is free and open to the public.
November 12, 2021

18th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies Nov. 10-12, 2021

This year’s Ray Warren Symposium is titled Joy and Justice.

Join us for keynote presentations, panels, workshops, and other events examining racial justice and liberation through a lens of joy.

Details on the Ray Warren Symposium website.
November 11, 2021

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote Speaker Ashon Crawley

Ashon Crawley, writer, artist, and associate professor of religious studies and African American and African studies at the University of Virginia will deliver a presentation titled Joy–Not Destination but Practice.

Visit the Ray Warren Symposium website for additional information.
November 11, 2021

18th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies Nov. 10-12, 2021

This year’s Ray Warren Symposium is titled Joy and Justice.

Join us for keynote presentations, panels, workshops, and other events examining racial justice and liberation through a lens of joy.

Details on the Ray Warren Symposium website.
November 10, 2021

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote Speaker Matika Wilbur

Matika Wilbur (Swinomish and Tulalip), award-winning photographer and cohost of the popular Native issues podcast All My Relations will deliver a presentation titled Changing the Way We See Native America.

Visit the Ray Warren Symposium website for additional information.
November 10, 2021

18th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies Nov. 10-12, 2021

This year’s Ray Warren Symposium is titled Joy and Justice.

Join us for keynote presentations, panels, workshops, and other events examining racial justice and liberation through a lens of joy.

Details on the Ray Warren Symposium website.
Green with Milk and Sugar
November 8, 2021

Green with Milk and Sugar: When Japan Filled America’s Tea Cups

Lecture by Robert Hellyer
March 12, 2021

Gender Studies Symposium Panel–No More Stolen Sisters: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW)

No More Stolen Sisters: Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women (MMIW)

Presented by Katie McDonald, Mary Bodine, Corrina Ikakoula, Caroline Rouwalk, Jade Unger, and Siena Lopez-Johnson, members of Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) American Indian Alaska Native Employee Council

The session is co-sponsored by L&C Native Student Union.
March 12, 2021

40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: Lack & Absence

The 40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium will focus on questions of absence and lack, exploring the theoretical, political, and interpersonal dimensions of these questions in terms of gender and sexuality. We invite participants to consider who or what is overlooked, hidden, excluded, silenced, or invisible, as well as what it might mean to uncover, include, illuminate, amplify, or recuperate what has been absent or lacking.

 

until March 12, 2021
March 11, 2021

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Presentation: Jennifer C. Nash

Keynote presentation by Jennifer C. Nash, Jean Fox O’Barr Professor of Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies at Duke University, and author of Black Feminism Reimagined: After Intersectionality and The Black Body in Ecstasy: Reading Race, Reading Pornography

March 11, 2021

Gender Studies Symposium Panel–(In)Visibility

(In)Visibility

Moderator: Magalí Rabasa, L&C assistant professor of Hispanic studies

Samuel Shelton
, PhD candidate in women, gender, and sexuality studies, Oregon State University, “Barely Hanging On: The Challenges of Care Work and Being a Graduate Teaching Assistant in the Time of COVID-19”

Gina Schlesselman-Tarango, associate librarian and coordinator of library instruction, California State University, San Bernardino, “Reproductive Failure: Neoliberal Bodies & Invisible Labor”

Chasia Elzina Jeffries, University of Southern California ’21, “Wretched Women: Frantz Fanon & the Unarchivability of Black Women”

Madisyn Taylor, L&C ’21, “Not-So-Hot Girl Summer”
March 11, 2021

40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: Lack & Absence

The 40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium will focus on questions of absence and lack, exploring the theoretical, political, and interpersonal dimensions of these questions in terms of gender and sexuality. We invite participants to consider who or what is overlooked, hidden, excluded, silenced, or invisible, as well as what it might mean to uncover, include, illuminate, amplify, or recuperate what has been absent or lacking.

 

until March 12, 2021
March 10, 2021

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Presentation: Carmen Maria Machado

Keynote presentation by Carmen Maria Machado, award-winning author of In the Dream House and Her Body and Other Parties, and writer in residence at the University of Pennsylvania
March 10, 2021

40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: Lack & Absence

The 40th Annual Gender Studies Symposium will focus on questions of absence and lack, exploring the theoretical, political, and interpersonal dimensions of these questions in terms of gender and sexuality. We invite participants to consider who or what is overlooked, hidden, excluded, silenced, or invisible, as well as what it might mean to uncover, include, illuminate, amplify, or recuperate what has been absent or lacking.

 

until March 12, 2021
Bust shot of Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.
January 23, 2021

From Resilience to Black Liberation - An MLK Virtual Racial Justice Teach-In

Join the MLK Racial Justice Campus Collaborative in co-creating a space to move from oppressive systems towards collective liberation.
November 13, 2020

Race Monologues: Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Race Monologues

Each year a different group of L&C students writes an original series of personal narratives to share their feelings, experiences, and understandings of race, ethnicity, and identity.

Coordinated by L&C students Yashshree Raj Bisht ’21, Liza Clairagneau ’21, and Sheyla Dorantes ’21.

Registration is required by 6 pm on Friday, November 13. You must register with a Lewis & Clark email address.

November 13, 2020

Performance: The People vs. _____. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


4–5:30 p.m.
Performance: The People vs. _____
Conceived and written by Josie Seid

“First rule of change is controversy. You can’t get away from it for the simple reason all issues are controversial. Change means movement, and movement means friction, and friction means heat, and heat means controversy.” — Saul Alinsky

We have returned to the place in our world where the people are pushing for change. A movement has reawakened and chosen its form as movements tend to do. Are these movements— in the forms they take—creating the change we seek? If movements are so effective, why do we seem to always find ourselves back at this place? We invite viewers to act as the jury as we take a closer look at the evolution of the movement and hear arguments for and against, in this case of: The People vs. _____.

Co-sponsored by Students for Cultural Inclusion in the Theater (SCIT)

November 13, 2020

Roundtable discussion: Pandemic Solidarity: Mutual Aid in the Covid-19 Crisis. Ray Warren Symposium2020

Friday, November 13


2–3:30 p.m.
Roundtable discussion: Pandemic Solidarity: Mutual Aid in the Covid-19 Crisis
In early April 2020 a group of activists, writers, and scholars convened to conduct interviews about the unprecedented mutual aid efforts emerging simultaneously around the world as communities of all kinds were forced to rapidly confront the challenges posed by the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. This transnational collaboration resulted in the formation of Colectiva Sembrar and the publication of a book in late June, Pandemic Solidarity, that includes over 100 interviews with individuals and collectives in over 17 countries and one autonomous territory, Rojava. This panel will bring together members of Colectiva Sembrar as well as some of the people interviewed in the book for a roundtable about solidarity, mutual aid, and social justice in the age of Covid-19.

Moderator: Magalí Rabasa, L&C assistant professor of Hispanic studies
Conversation featuring Hari Alluri, Timo Bartholl, Lais Gomes Duarte, Seyma Ozdemir, Magalí Rabasa, and Marina Sitrin

November 13, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 13, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


November 12, 2020

Black Diasporic Motherhood. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

4–5:30 p.m.
Black Diasporic Motherhood 
This panel centers the daily lived experiences of Afro-descendent mothers and explores their methods of resistance and ways of forming while mothering in an anti-Black society. The discussion will examine how Black mothers prepare their children to live in a racialized state, how Black mothers of different ethnicities socialize their children, and how transnational kinship is formed between Black mothers of varied cultural backgrounds.
November 12, 2020

Roundtable discussion: The Flows Between Education and Incarceration. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

12–1:30 p.m.
Roundtable discussion: The Flows Between Education and Incarceration
Panel description: details forthcoming
Moderator: Reiko Hillyer, L&C associate professor of history
November 11, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

November 11, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 11, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


November 10, 2020

Black Diasporic Motherhood. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

4–5:30 p.m.
Black Diasporic Motherhood 
This panel centers the daily lived experiences of Afro-descendent mothers and explores their methods of resistance and ways of forming while mothering in an anti-Black society. The discussion will examine how Black mothers prepare their children to live in a racialized state, how Black mothers of different ethnicities socialize their children, and how transnational kinship is formed between Black mothers of varied cultural backgrounds.

Moderator: Valerie White, L&C ombuds
Channon Miller, assistant professor of history, University of San Diego (bio)
Alaí Reyes-Santos, associate professor of Indigenous, race, and ethnic studies, University of Oregon (bio)
Additional presenters to be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 9, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 9, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 9, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


November 6, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 6, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 6, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


November 5, 2020

Black Diasporic Motherhood. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

4–5:30 p.m.
Black Diasporic Motherhood 
This panel centers the daily lived experiences of Afro-descendent mothers and explores their methods of resistance and ways of forming while mothering in an anti-Black society. The discussion will examine how Black mothers prepare their children to live in a racialized state, how Black mothers of different ethnicities socialize their children, and how transnational kinship is formed between Black mothers of varied cultural backgrounds.

Moderator: Valerie White, L&C ombuds
Channon Miller, assistant professor of history, University of San Diego (bio)
Alaí Reyes-Santos, associate professor of Indigenous, race, and ethnic studies, University of Oregon (bio)
Additional presenters to be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 5, 2020

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution
Zoom Webinar
Thursday, November 5th
4-5pm PT
Register now: bit.ly/LORU-LC
November 4, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 4, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 4, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


November 3, 2020

Black Diasporic Motherhood. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

4–5:30 p.m.
Black Diasporic Motherhood 
This panel centers the daily lived experiences of Afro-descendent mothers and explores their methods of resistance and ways of forming while mothering in an anti-Black society. The discussion will examine how Black mothers prepare their children to live in a racialized state, how Black mothers of different ethnicities socialize their children, and how transnational kinship is formed between Black mothers of varied cultural backgrounds.

Moderator: Valerie White, L&C ombuds
Channon Miller, assistant professor of history, University of San Diego (bio)
Alaí Reyes-Santos, associate professor of Indigenous, race, and ethnic studies, University of Oregon (bio)
Additional presenters to be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 3, 2020

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution
Zoom Webinar
Thursday, November 5th
4-5pm PT
Register now: bit.ly/LORU-LC
November 2, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 2, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

November 2, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


October 30, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 30, 2020

Heritage Travel and Tourism. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13


12:15–1:30 p.m.
Navigating the World: Heritage Travel and Tourism
Traveling to a significant place filled with histories of ancestral heritage is a journey that many of us make — as tourists, leisure travelers, students, and scholars. How does this type of travel influence our national, ethnic, and racial identities? How do these physical and bodily movements of exploring our roots affectively and emotionally shape our sense of ourselves?This discussion will examine transnational identities, diasporic stories, and global perspectives about contemporary modes of heritage tourism.
Moderator: Kabir Mansingh Heimsath, L&C assistant professor with term of anthropology and Asian studies
Bayo Holsey, associate professor of anthropology at Emory University and director of Emory Institute of African Studies, author of Routes of Remembrance: Refashioning the Slave Trade in Ghana (bio)
Emily Schneider, assistant professor of criminology and criminal justice, Northern Arizona University, scholar of Jewish tourism to Israel/Palestine
Grace Newton, writes about transnational and transracial adoption at Red Thread Broken
Additional presenters may be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and Zoom links can be found during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 30, 2020

Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

Friday, November 13
10:30–11:45 a.m.
Race Across Disciplinary Boundaries: Student Research Presentations


October 29, 2020

Black Diasporic Motherhood. Ray Warren Symposium 2020

4–5:30 p.m.
Black Diasporic Motherhood 
This panel centers the daily lived experiences of Afro-descendent mothers and explores their methods of resistance and ways of forming while mothering in an anti-Black society. The discussion will examine how Black mothers prepare their children to live in a racialized state, how Black mothers of different ethnicities socialize their children, and how transnational kinship is formed between Black mothers of varied cultural backgrounds.

Moderator: Valerie White, L&C ombuds
Channon Miller, assistant professor of history, University of San Diego (bio)
Alaí Reyes-Santos, associate professor of Indigenous, race, and ethnic studies, University of Oregon (bio)
Additional presenters to be confirmed.

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 28, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 27, 2020

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution

Log On. Rise Up: The Global Women’s Revolution
Zoom Webinar
Thursday, November 5th
4-5pm PT
Register now: bit.ly/LORU-LC
October 26, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 23, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 23, 2020

Research News and Brews: Zoom Event

Please join faculty and staff to hear colleagues present short, informal talks on their research.

October 21, 2020

2020 Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Wednesday, November 11
7 p.m.

Keynote Event for Ray Warren Symposium

The stutter has run away from any government

JJJJJerome Ellis, Afro-Cuban composer, performer, and writer

No registration required. More information and zoom links will be posted during the week of November 11 here.

Sponsored by the Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies.

October 21, 2020

Hostile Terrain 94 Art Event

Please join us in filling out toe tags for the Hostile Terrain 94 art installation. We are also recording short videos (participation optional) for the HT94 Video Compilation.
October 19, 2020

Call for Visual Art: Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

17th Annual Ray Warren Symposium
November 11-13, 2020

Movement
Call for Visual Art submission deadline:
Monday, October, 19, 2020 by 6 pm

October 16, 2020

Call for Visual Art: Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

17th Annual Ray Warren Symposium
November 11-13, 2020

Movement
Call for Visual Art submission deadline:
Monday, October, 19, 2020 by 6 pm

October 15, 2020

Call for Visual Art: Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

17th Annual Ray Warren Symposium
November 11-13, 2020

Movement
Call for Visual Art submission deadline:
Monday, October, 19, 2020 by 6 pm

June 4, 2020

Thursday, June 4th, 2020 Zoom Discussion with Ethnic Studies on Murder of George Floyd and Police Violence

We will be hosting a virtual forum on Zoom on Thursday, June 4th noon to 1 pm (PDT) to discuss the murder of George Floyd, police violence, and possible ways to take action. We invite the whole Lewis & Clark community to participate. https://zoom.us/j/94118284908
until June 4, 2020
June 3, 2020

Thursday, June 4th, 2020 Zoom Discussion with Ethnic Studies on Murder of George Floyd and Police Violence

We will be hosting a virtual forum on Zoom on Thursday, June 4th noon to 1 pm (PDT) to discuss the murder of George Floyd, police violence, and possible ways to take action. We invite the whole Lewis & Clark community to participate. https://zoom.us/j/94118284908
until June 4, 2020
March 13, 2020

39th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Tensions of Possibility
March 11-13, 2020
until March 13, 2020
March 12, 2020

39th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Tensions of Possibility
March 11-13, 2020
until March 13, 2020
March 11, 2020

39th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Tensions of Possibility
March 11-13, 2020
until March 13, 2020
Martin Luther King, Jr. Service Day
January 25, 2020

MLK Service Day 2020

Register soon! Join us in honoring Dr. King through service and learning.
Ray Warren Symposium: Beyond Resistance logo.
November 15, 2019

Beyond Resistance: Race and Revolutionary Struggle

The 16th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies explores the many ways in which generations of people of color have challenged unjust and oppressive institutions.
until November 15, 2019
November 14, 2019

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote: Prison Abolitionist Imagination

Jackie Wang, black studies scholar, poet, multimedia artist, and author of Carceral Capitalism

Ray Warren Symposium: Beyond Resistance logo.
November 14, 2019

Beyond Resistance: Race and Revolutionary Struggle

The 16th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies explores the many ways in which generations of people of color have challenged unjust and oppressive institutions.
until November 15, 2019
November 13, 2019

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote: It’s Our Future: Reimagining Environmental Justice

Feliquan Charlemagne, national executive director, and Kimaya Mahajan, Washington co-director, U.S. Youth Climate Strike activists
Ray Warren Symposium: Beyond Resistance logo.
November 13, 2019

Beyond Resistance: Race and Revolutionary Struggle

The 16th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies explores the many ways in which generations of people of color have challenged unjust and oppressive institutions.
until November 15, 2019
November 8, 2019

Nailed It

Film Screening and Q&A with Film Maker Adele Pham
April 14, 2019

Franya Berkman & Obo Addy World Music Concert

The Lewis & Clark Department of Music presents its 7th annual Franya Berkman & Obo Addy World Music Concert on Sunday, April 14, 2019 at 3:00pm in Evans Auditorium. This concert, presented in memory of our beloved World Music faculty members, will feature performances of music from around the world by Lewis & Clark students.
SOAN C3 Speaker Mai Thai
April 8, 2019

SOAN Department C3 Speaker Series: Inequality in America: Sociological Reflections on Our Changing World 

“Making ‘Model Citizens’: Junior Police, Youth, and Social Control in School” by Mai Thai, PhD Candidate, Sociology, Indiana University-Bloomington

March 15, 2019

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event: Maggie Nelson, Songs of Care and Constraint

Maggie Nelson, award-winning author, recent recipient of MacArthur Foundation “Genius” Fellowship, and professor of English at the University of Southern California
March 15, 2019

38th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Who Cares?
March 13-15, 2019
until March 15, 2019
March 14, 2019

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event: From Heroes to Supermaids to TNTS

Anna Guevarra, award-winning author and associate professor and founding director of global Asian studies, University of Illinois at Chicago
March 14, 2019

38th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Who Cares?
March 13-15, 2019
until March 15, 2019
March 13, 2019

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event: Redefining and Transforming the Concept of Care

Keynote event by Monica Raye Simpson, activist, performer, and executive director of SisterSong: Women of Color Reproductive Justice Collective
March 13, 2019

38th Annual Gender Studies Symposium

Who Cares?
March 13-15, 2019
until March 15, 2019
March 3, 2019

Interrupting Hate in Public Spaces

Sunday, March 3, 2019, 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
3 CEUs, PDUs or Washington Clock Hours
February 28, 2019

Fourth Annual PNW Race, Rhetoric, and Media Symposium

The symposium will highlight student work that focuses on the intersection of media, sports, and public culture.

February 25, 2019

SOAN Spring 2019 Colloquium, Part I

Underground Publishing Networks and Autonomous Politics in Latin America, 

by Magalí Rabasa, Assistant Professor of Hispanic Studies in the Department of World Languages & Literatures at Lewis & Clark College

Resiliency: The Art of Bouncing Back6-7:30pm in StammTuesday, February 12
February 12, 2019

Resiliency: The Art of Bouncing Back

L&C undergraduate students share their stories of facing and overcoming challenges. Explore strategies and resources for cultivating more resilience in your life.
Folsom 50, led by alumni Danny Wilson '88 and Tracy Schlapp ?87, are coming to campus November 17.
November 17, 2018

Folsom50: Outside Prison Walls

Creative partners Danny Wilson ’88 and Tracy Schlapp ’87 bring their FOLSOM50 project to Lewis & Clark College for a rare show.
November 15, 2018

WE BELIEVE YOU / NOSOTRAS TE CREEMOS: The Historic Demands and Current Struggle of the Feminist Movement in Chile

The Historic Demands and Current Struggle of the Feminist Movement in Chile

Presentation and Discussion with Chilean artist & activist Yanira Obando and Portland-based filmmaker & activist Kelly Baur.

2018 Ray Warren Symposium poster for Bitter Pills.
November 9, 2018

Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine - 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

How do systems of oppression make people sick? Who has access to healthcare, and whose well-being is prioritized through public health policies? Though science and medicine are often considered neutral and objective, how have culturally created classifications of race shaped biomedical research and clinical practices? How, in turn, does medical science perpetuate racial ideologies? 

Critical questions like these are at the center of the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies, which will explore the racialized dimensions of health and medicine in institutions, communities, and individual experiences.
until November 9, 2018
2018 Ray Warren Symposium poster for Bitter Pills.
November 8, 2018

Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine - 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

How do systems of oppression make people sick? Who has access to healthcare, and whose well-being is prioritized through public health policies? Though science and medicine are often considered neutral and objective, how have culturally created classifications of race shaped biomedical research and clinical practices? How, in turn, does medical science perpetuate racial ideologies? 

Critical questions like these are at the center of the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies, which will explore the racialized dimensions of health and medicine in institutions, communities, and individual experiences.
until November 9, 2018
November 7, 2018

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote: How Modern Medicine Was Born of Slavery

Ray Warren Symposium keynote speaker Cooper Owens will explain how the institution of American slavery was directly linked to the creation of reproductive medicine in the U.S. Click to read more.
2018 Ray Warren Symposium poster for Bitter Pills.
November 7, 2018

Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine - 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

How do systems of oppression make people sick? Who has access to healthcare, and whose well-being is prioritized through public health policies? Though science and medicine are often considered neutral and objective, how have culturally created classifications of race shaped biomedical research and clinical practices? How, in turn, does medical science perpetuate racial ideologies? 

Critical questions like these are at the center of the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies, which will explore the racialized dimensions of health and medicine in institutions, communities, and individual experiences.
until November 9, 2018
October 23, 2018

21st Annual Environmental Symposium

Klan We Talk?  Race, Environment, Engagement, and Empowerment, a keynote by Daryl Davis
Free Speech Symposium: Questioning the Marketplace of Ideas
October 10, 2018

Free Speech Symposium: Questioning the Marketplace of Ideas

Join us for a day of discussion and dialogue with CAS, Law, and Grad students, staff, and faculty.
September 29, 2018

An Homage to Women Poets of Iran

The Lewis & Clark Department of Music welcomes The Andisheh Center of Portland to campus to celebrate Iranian cultural heritage through a day of workshops followed by an evening performance.
September 27, 2018

Criminal Justice Up Close. From Jailhouse Lawyer to Law Student: The Story of Calvin Duncan

At age 19, Calvin Duncan was wrongfully convicted of murder. After serving over 28 years in Angola prison for a crime he did not commit, he was released in 2011. Since his release, he has been awarded a Soros Justice Fellowship to vindicate the rights of incarcerated people and is the program director of The Light of Justice Program, which helps incarcerated people gain access to the courts.
April 18, 2018

Dismantle, Change, Build! An Introductory Workshop on Abolition and the Prison Industrial Complex

Dismantle, Change, Build! An Introductory Workshop on Abolition and the Prison Industrial Complex

Join Ethnic Studies and IME for a workshop with members of Critical Resistance Portland
James Padilioni, Jr.,   Consortium for Faculty Diversity Dissertation Fellow
April 2, 2018

“But how could we sing the Lord’s song in a strange Land?” Slave Religion and Consciousness in the Afro-Peruvian Diaspora

Consortium for Faculty Diversity Dissertation Fellow, James Padilioni, Jr., will give a lecture that interrogates the experience of Black chattel slavery by centering slave religion. In particular, I focus on Martin de Porres (1579-1639), a mixed-race friar from Lima, Peru who ministered to the enslaved community. The Vatican canonized Martin in 1962 as the patron saint of social justice. Martin and the enslaved community’s Catholic practices reveal the ways Africans made sense of their American captivity by selectively braiding together aspects of their indigenous traditions with the trappings of Baroque Spanish Catholicism. By reinterpreting their worldviews in additive and expansive ways, enslaved Africans creatively worked out new forms of spiritual knowing that related them to the material conditions of their lives. I approach these ritual practices as critical expressions of Afro-Peruvian values that harbored memory, catalyzed everyday politics, and populated integrated social worlds that span spiritual and material planes, returning the full potentiality of the divine to those most-marginalized on Earth.
Dr. Marcia Chatelain, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Georgetown U...
March 19, 2018

Fast Food Civil Rights

Dr. Marcia Chatelaine, Associate Professor of History and African American Studies at Georgetown University, will discuss her latest book project.
March 9, 2018

37th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: inSecurity

March 7-9, 2018
go to our website for the schedule
until March 9, 2018
March 8, 2018

37th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: inSecurity

March 7-9, 2018
go to our website for the schedule
until March 9, 2018
March 7, 2018

37th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: inSecurity

March 7-9, 2018
go to our website for the schedule
until March 9, 2018
February 26, 2018

We Are Not The Enemy! Remembering the World War II Internment of Japanese Latin Americans and Their Ongoing Struggle for Justice

Presentation with Grace Shimizu, Director of the Japanese Peruvian Oral History Project and Coordinator for Campaign for Justice: Redress Now for Japanese Latin Americans.
February 21, 2018

4th Annual Middle East Symposium

Monday February 19th


6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

 

7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
Symposium Dinner Banquet
Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

 


Tuesday February 20th 


 

2pm-3pm, Location TBA
The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



any resolution.”


 

4pm-5pm, Albany 218
“Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

Morocco Student Research Panel
Moderator: 
Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
• Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
• Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
  Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


7pm-8pm, Howard 102

Film Screening: White Helmets 

This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


 


Wednesday February 19th 


 


12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
• Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
• Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
  Democratic Transition.”
• Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
  Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

 

4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

“Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

 

6pm, Stamm
Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

until February 21, 2018
February 20, 2018

4th Annual Middle East Symposium

Monday February 19th


6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

 

7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
Symposium Dinner Banquet
Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

 


Tuesday February 20th 


 

2pm-3pm, Location TBA
The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



any resolution.”


 

4pm-5pm, Albany 218
“Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

Morocco Student Research Panel
Moderator: 
Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
• Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
• Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
  Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


7pm-8pm, Howard 102

Film Screening: White Helmets 

This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


 


Wednesday February 19th 


 


12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
• Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
• Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
  Democratic Transition.”
• Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
  Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

 

4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

“Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

 

6pm, Stamm
Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

until February 21, 2018
DAMN be HUMBLE: A Chamberlin Social Justice Forum
February 19, 2018

DAMN be HUMBLE: Addressing the Flaws in Secular and Theological Responses to Injustice

DAMN be HUMBLE is the 2018 Chamberlin Social Justice Forum, featuring Dr. Daymond Glenn and Dr. Jess Bielman. Glenn and Bielman will be discussing the flaws in secular and theological responses to injustice, and what we can do about it.




Dr. Daymond Glenn MEd ’03, EdD ’09, is back at Lewis & Clark as the new assistant director of the Teaching Excellence Program. As a visiting assistant professor, Glenn is also teaching courses this term on critical hip-hop studies and contemporary African-American issues in urban America.


Dr. Jess Bielman is the Director of Campus Ministries and Assistant Professor of Christian Ministries at Warner Pacific College, a Christian liberal arts college in Portland, OR. Bielman received his D.Min. from Wesley Seminary in Washington D.C. focusing on Spirituality and Storytelling. He also co-pastors a house church.

The Chamberlin Social Justice Forum is sponsored by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life.

February 19, 2018

4th Annual Middle East Symposium

Monday February 19th


6pm-7pm,  Howard 102
Keynote Presentation - Dr. Omar Reda, OHSU
Dr. Reda a Libyan-American doctor specializing in forensic psychiatrist and teaches at Oregon Health Sciences University. Reda fled his homeland in 1999 upon receiving threat of arrest by Ghaddafi’s forces for delivering food and supplies to families of those imprisoned by the regime. Over the past decade, Reda has frequently returned to Libya to help those affected by conflict and has worked to create programs to help children recover emotionally from experiences of trauma.  

 

7:15-8:30pm, Smith Hall
Symposium Dinner Banquet
Members of the Lewis & Clark Community are invited to attend a dinner banquet for all symposium presenters, organizers, and guests. This gathering is an opportunity to interact with presenters and recognize the efforts of the steering committee. This event is catered by Ya-Hala Lebanese Cuisine. 

 


Tuesday February 20th 


 

2pm-3pm, Location TBA
The ‘Cyprus Conflict’: The Experiences of a Fulbright-Hayes Participant on an Island Divided
Omeica Hudson, Department of Education Fulbright-Hayes Participant
Presentation Abstract: ”Cyprus is an island off the coast of Turkey that has had multiple civil wars between ethnicities over political power sharing. These wars led to UN peacekeeping troops helping to create a ceasefire in 1974 that is still in effect today. This conflict has been termed the “Cyprus Conflict”.

The wars split Cyprus into two nations based on ethnicity: the southern, Greek (The Republic of Cyprus) and the northern, Turkish,( Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus) There is a “UN Buffer Zone” called the “Green Line” that stretches 112 miles from north to south and is about 4 miles wide at its widest point. Most of the buffer zone is a graveyard and time capsule of lost lives, land, homes, and histories and is now patrolled by UN peacekeeping troops and border patrols. At one point, the “Green Line” runs through the center of the capital city, Nicosia, the only divided capital city in the world. The village of Pyla, located inside the “Green Line”, is the only village in Cyprus where Greeks and Turks communities live and govern together.

Although there is a ceasefire between these two segregated nations, Cyprus has technically been at war for the last 43 years. UN sponsored negotiation talks have been held many times over the last 43 years without success. The last negotiations were in the works this summer. As I lived among those hoping for progress towards reunification through an equitable bi-communal, bi-zonal federation, there was a palpable sense of loss and frustration when the news broke in July that the UN-sponsored talks ended without



any resolution.”


 

4pm-5pm, Albany 218
“Collective Amnesia: The Multi-Cultural Contributions of Al-Andalus to Western Civilization”
Dr. Julia Bazi, Lewis & Clark Professor of Music 
Presentation abstract:  For almost 800 years, Al Andalus fostered an enlightened culture in which three great Abrahamic traditions — Judaism, Christianity, and Islam — co-existed, interacted, and flourished. During the time of Al Andalus (711-1492), individuals of different ethnicities and faiths created an advanced and thriving culture which has had a lasting effect on world culture. So much of what we know and employ today dates back to this period. Modern-day science, technology, math, astronomy, medicine, music, agriculture, architecture, art and even clothing and dining etiquette can all find their roots centuries earlier in Islamic Spain. And yet, this is not a history with which many of us are familiar.The capacity of a memory to endure depends on the social power of the group that holds it and records that history. Collective memory implies by extension, the concept of collective forgetting. This phenomena has its own history. This presentation explores how older Iberian memories continue to influence our present and how the period of Al Andalus, often entirely ignored in our Western History books has had, and continues to have far reaching consequences in the present.


5:30-6:30pm, Albany 218

Morocco Student Research Panel
Moderator: 
Dr. Oren Kosansky, Lewis & Clark Professor of Sociology & Anthropology and Director of the Middle East & North African Studies (MENA) Minor. 
• Bradley Davis CAS ’18, “Philosophy and the Islamic Republic”
• Emily Hayes-Rich CAS ’19, “The Moroccan Khettara: State Influences Over Rural, Desert
  Morocco from the 7th Century to the Present.” 


7pm-8pm, Howard 102

Film Screening: White Helmets 

This 2016 documentary, set in Aleppo follows the daily operations of volunteer rescue workers known as the White Helmets as they work to save civilians affected by Syria’s civil war. A short discussion will follow the screening. Pizza will be provided at this event. 


 


Wednesday February 19th 


 


12:30pm-1:30pm, Albany 218
Identity & Belonging : Student Research Panel
• Naomi Goldman-Nagel CAS ’19, “Monologues From a Girl with a Multifaceted Identity.”
• Lindsey Clark CAS ’18, “The Arab Spring ‘Success’ Case: Challenges to Tunisia’s      
  Democratic Transition.”
• Noam Margalit CAS ’18, “A Society Built on Death’: Examining the Presence and
  Absence of Dying in Israel.”  

 

4:30-5:30pm, Howard 102

“Explaining Women’s Electability: Role Congruity and the Importance of Candidate Type”
Dr. Lindsay Benstead, Portland State University Professor of Political Science and Interim Director of the Middle East Studies Center (MESC)

Presentation abstract: Ensuring female representation has been at the forefront of the global development agenda. Yet, little is known about which traits or social, economic, or political roles make women more electable. When and why do voters cast ballots for women, and how can insights into this help scholars, policymakers, and development specialists have a clearer understanding of the prospects of increasing women’s roles? Gender role congruity theory argues that bias against females for leadership roles stems from a mismatch between stereotyped gender roles and the traits associated with a “good leader.” We extend this theory by arguing that the credentials that candidates emphasize, such as their success as business entrepreneurs or civil society activists, has a significant influence on the extent to which voters prefer male over female voters because candidates are also judged as effective occupants of these roles when considered as future political leaders. Drawing on data from four original survey experiments conducted in Tunisia, Egypt, and Jordan between 2012 and 2014, we show that electability varies according to the skills candidates bring to the job. In the survey experiment, respondents were presented at random with brief descriptions of candidates who were either male or female and engaged in civil society work or business. We find strong and consistent evidence across the four countries that voters prefer business candidates to civil society candidates. Moreover, males in particular prefer male candidates to female candidates. But, the gender gap in electability is larger for business candidates – roles for which women are often stereotyped as unfit – than civil society candidates. When male and female candidates are running on civil society platforms, the gender bias at the polls is narrowed. We argue that this is because many view women as caring and community-oriented, and thus as having the traits that many equate with successful civil society activists.

 

6pm, Stamm
Musical Performance by the Al Andalus Ensemble 
Al-Andalus Ensemble an award winning musical ensemble that performs both traditional Andalusian music and contemporary work.  It is internationally known for its innovative fusion of Middle Eastern, North African, European and American traditions, which it represents through world, jazz, flamenco and classical music. The group’s spectrum of work includes original Nuevo-Andalusian and jazz pieces to stirring renditions of American spirituals to thrilling, improvised percussion solos played on traditional clay drums, and much more.

until February 21, 2018
Images of Actor Ron Jones
January 25, 2018

The Movement: A Dramatic Portrayal of 50 Years of Social Justice

MLK Week 2018 Chamberlin Performance! One actor, ten characters, and fifty years of social justice. Join us for “The Movement”, a whirlwind tour of African American history with Emmy-Award winning actor Ron Jones. With videos, pop culture references, and a healthy dose of humor, Jones takes his audience on a journey of love and struggle. Sponsored by the Office of Religious and Spiritual Life’s Chamberlin Social Justice Fund and the MLK Jr. Week 2018 Committee in the Council Chamber.

January 19, 2018

MLK Jr. Week 2018: I Am Not Your Negro Film Screening

Part of MLK Jr. Week 2018
November 18, 2017

A Homage to Khayyam

On behalf of Lewis and Clark College Music Department and Andisheh Center, we are pleased to invite you to Iranian traditional music and art workshops followed by an evening performance on November 18, 2017 in the Diane Gregg Pavilion and Agnes Flanagan Chapel.
November 16, 2017

Submission Deadline for Journal for Social Justice: Dec. 8th

Submission deadline for Journal for Social Justice: Dec. 8th

Email socialjustice@lclark.edu with your justice-oriented prose, poetry, academic writing, photos, and visual art!
November 10, 2017

14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium, Legacy: Race and Remembrance

Join us at the 14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies in examining the way we remember the past, reflecting on the stories we tell, and imagining a more equitable future.
until November 10, 2017
November 9, 2017

Ray Warren Keynote Presentation. Jelani Cobb, historian and award-winning

Presentation by Jelani Cobb, historian and award-winning New Yorker staff writer.
November 9, 2017

14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium, Legacy: Race and Remembrance

Join us at the 14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies in examining the way we remember the past, reflecting on the stories we tell, and imagining a more equitable future.
until November 10, 2017
November 8, 2017

Visible Legacies: Cultural Continuance through Art

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote speakers: Cultural practitioner Sulu’ape Keone Nunes and multimedia artist Wendy Red Star 

November 8, 2017

14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium, Legacy: Race and Remembrance

Join us at the 14th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies in examining the way we remember the past, reflecting on the stories we tell, and imagining a more equitable future.
until November 10, 2017
November 4, 2017

Staged reading of “Cottonwood in the Flood”

A special pre-symposium event:
Staged reading of Cottonwood in the Flood, followed by panel discussion

Written by Rich Rubin; directed by Damaris Webb
Free Admission
Demian DinéYazhi´
October 31, 2017

Artist Talk- Demian DinéYazhi´

Visiting artist talk with Demian DinéYazhi´
October 26, 2017

ENVS Symposium: Environmental Engagement in Tough Times

Lewis & Clark College’s Environmental Studies Program announces its 20th annual Environmental Symposium on the theme “Environmental Engagement in Tough Times.” Perhaps more than ever, environmental issues have become divisive terrain in the U.S., prompting individuals, organizations, and leaders on all sides to mobilize and fight. These actions may be understandable, but they exacerbate an increasingly fractured American society, where people rarely talk to those with whom they disagree. This year’s Symposium launches a yearlong series of events and projects exploring possibilities for engagement across these boundaries, in the context of the major environmental issues of our time.
until October 26, 2017
October 25, 2017

ENVS Symposium: Environmental Engagement in Tough Times

Lewis & Clark College’s Environmental Studies Program announces its 20th annual Environmental Symposium on the theme “Environmental Engagement in Tough Times.” Perhaps more than ever, environmental issues have become divisive terrain in the U.S., prompting individuals, organizations, and leaders on all sides to mobilize and fight. These actions may be understandable, but they exacerbate an increasingly fractured American society, where people rarely talk to those with whom they disagree. This year’s Symposium launches a yearlong series of events and projects exploring possibilities for engagement across these boundaries, in the context of the major environmental issues of our time.
until October 26, 2017
October 24, 2017

Opposing White Supremacy Speaker Series, “Trouble in Charlottesville: Confederate Memorialization and its Legacy”

Join Ethnic Studies in the first talk in our Opposing White Supremacy Series. Trouble in Charlottesville: Confederate Memorialization and its Legacy. Presentation by Reiko Hillyer, assistant professor of history and ethnic studies.
October 24, 2017

ENVS Symposium: Environmental Engagement in Tough Times

Lewis & Clark College’s Environmental Studies Program announces its 20th annual Environmental Symposium on the theme “Environmental Engagement in Tough Times.” Perhaps more than ever, environmental issues have become divisive terrain in the U.S., prompting individuals, organizations, and leaders on all sides to mobilize and fight. These actions may be understandable, but they exacerbate an increasingly fractured American society, where people rarely talk to those with whom they disagree. This year’s Symposium launches a yearlong series of events and projects exploring possibilities for engagement across these boundaries, in the context of the major environmental issues of our time.
until October 26, 2017
October 11, 2017

Responsibilities and Rights: Community and Free Speech Symposium

How does “free speech” operate on a private, liberal arts campus? Where are the legal boundaries? How do we make sense of the impact of speech on others, especially in relation to power, equity, and privilege? Where are the tensions between speech and community? This symposium seeks to explore these questions and more as we situate them in the context of Lewis & Clark College.
October 3, 2017

Critical Hip Hop Studies: Hope, Possibility, and Resistance. Presentation with Dr. Daymond Glenn

Critical Hip Hop Studies: Hope, Possibility, and Resistant. A Presentation with Dr. Daymond Glenn, visiting assistant professor and assistant director of the Teaching Excellence program.
September 26, 2017

IME Wokeshop: Oppression, Privilege, and Microaggressions

Have you ever experienced or witnessed a form of oppression in your daily life? Come learn about different forms of oppression and privilege, and how they show up in our lives at Lewis & Clark. Here you can build your social justice vocabulary and deepen your knowledge about systems of oppression. Everyone is welcome!


Brought to you by the office of Inclusion & Multicultural Engagement
September 12, 2017

IME Wokeshop: The Power of Language

Join in for an engaging workshop about inclusive language and the power of words. Learn skills for speaking up against hurtful language, and for creating inclusive spaces in your residence halls, club meetings, classes, and beyond. Everyone is welcome!


Brought to you by the office of Inclusion & Multicultural Engagement
April 20, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
April 14, 2017

Festival of Scholars

A day an for Lewis & Clark student-scholars and artists to present their research and art, while also learning from one another.
April 13, 2017

Free Speech, Hate Groups, and the Public

Free Speech, Hate Groups,and the Public: A part of the Civil Disobedience workshop for Spring 2017.
April 6, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
March 30, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
March 23, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
March 16, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
art work by Diango Herna?ndez
March 9, 2017

Transitions: Cuban Visual Arts Today

Transitions: Cuban Art Today
Join Sara Alonso Gómez for a talk on Cuban art. 
Thursday, March 9
6:30 p.m.
Miller 102
March 9, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
March 2, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
February 24, 2017

Middle Eastern Studies Symposium

Join the Middle East Studies Initiative for the 3rd Annual Middle Eastern Studies Symposium.
until February 24, 2017
February 23, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
February 23, 2017

Middle Eastern Studies Symposium

Join the Middle East Studies Initiative for the 3rd Annual Middle Eastern Studies Symposium.
until February 24, 2017
February 22, 2017

Middle Eastern Studies Symposium

Join the Middle East Studies Initiative for the 3rd Annual Middle Eastern Studies Symposium.
until February 24, 2017
February 16, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
February 9, 2017

Civil Disobedience Workshop

Civil Disobedience Workshop.
This workshop is a response to the danger our country and the world faces in the wake of Donald Trump’s unconstitutional and illegal actions as president. In order to effectively oppose Trump’s agenda, we will look back to previous movements that employed civil disobedience as well as look forward as we develop new tactics that respond to our reality. The course is organized around a variety of themes that will explore the philosophy of civil disobedience as well as examining historical examples from the US and around the world of liberation and civil rights movements
February 7, 2017

BOCAFLOJA: Spoken word performance and film screening of Nana Dijo:Irresolute Radiography of Black Consciousness

Join hip hop artist, poet, and filmmaker BocaFloja for a spoken word performance followed by a film screening: Nana Dijo: Irresolute Radiography of Black Consciousness. Discussion to follow.
January 25, 2017

Fighting for Racial Justice During the Trump Presidency: MLK Week Keynote Lecture by James Forman

Professor James Forman Jr. is a noted legal authority on the mass incarceration of black men in the U.S. criminal justice system.  He will give our Chamberlin Social Justice lecture for MLK Week 2017, speaking on “Fighting for Racial Justice During the Trump Presidency.” Inspired by Dr. King and other civil rights activists, Forman will offer concrete strategies for improving schools and eliminating the mass incarceration of black men.




Professor Forman teaches at Yale Law School and writes in the areas of criminal procedure and criminal law policy, constitutional law, juvenile justice, and education law and policy. His particular interests are schools, prisons, and police, and those institutions’ race and class dimensions. Professor Forman’s book, titled Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America, will be published in the spring of 2017.
January 20, 2017

Inauguration Day Teach-In: Learn • Discuss • Act

Learn and discuss issues we will be confronting under a Trump presidency and make plans to take action. Panels and discussion will immediately follow the Inauguration viewing at 8:30 a.m.
January 19, 2017

Tackling the Racial & Ethnic Disparity

In this informational panel, come hear from Multnomah County DA Rod Underhill, Portland Police Chief Mike Marshman, and Multnomah County Sheriff Mike Reese about the policy changes they’ve made using data from the Racial and Ethnic Disparities (RED) report. Event is open to the public. Questions? Contact Sarah Fine at sfine@lclark.edu.
December 5, 2016

Walking with Subjects of History: Accompanying Indigenous peoples’ struggle for autonomy and human rights in Chiapas, Mexico, and beyond

Walking with Subjects of History: Accompanying Indigenous peoples’ struggle for autonomy and human rights in Chiapas, Mexico, and beyond

 with Luisella Preciado, attorney with the Fray Bartolomé de las Casas Human Rights Center
November 18, 2016

Social Justice Tours

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. 

Co-sponsored by Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity and IME
until November 18, 2016
November 17, 2016

Social Justice Tours

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. 

Co-sponsored by Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity and IME
until November 18, 2016
November 16, 2016

Social Justice Tours

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. 

Co-sponsored by Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity and IME
until November 18, 2016
November 11, 2016

13th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

Home: Race, Place, and Belonging

This year’s symposium will address historical and contemporary issues such as racial disparities in housing, global migration in the context of nationalism, indigenous experiences of place, and the infinite ways in which we create and recreate home and community.  In thinking about race, place, and belonging, we hope to examine the boundaries that divide us, the lines that connect us, and the places that define us.
until November 11, 2016
November 10, 2016

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote Presentation: Jeff Chang

“You,” “Me,” and “We”: Difference, Belonging, and Community in the Era of Black Lives Matter







Jeff Chang, cultural critic and author 

November 10, 2016

13th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

Home: Race, Place, and Belonging

This year’s symposium will address historical and contemporary issues such as racial disparities in housing, global migration in the context of nationalism, indigenous experiences of place, and the infinite ways in which we create and recreate home and community.  In thinking about race, place, and belonging, we hope to examine the boundaries that divide us, the lines that connect us, and the places that define us.
until November 11, 2016
November 9, 2016

Ray Warren Symposium Keynote Panel: No Place Like Home: Housing and Displacement in Portland

Join us in kicking off the Ray Warren symposium with our keynote panel on housing and displacement in Portland, featuring local activists and community leaders.
November 9, 2016

13th Annual Ray Warren Symposium

Home: Race, Place, and Belonging

This year’s symposium will address historical and contemporary issues such as racial disparities in housing, global migration in the context of nationalism, indigenous experiences of place, and the infinite ways in which we create and recreate home and community.  In thinking about race, place, and belonging, we hope to examine the boundaries that divide us, the lines that connect us, and the places that define us.
until November 11, 2016
November 7, 2016

An Evening with W. Kamau Bell

Join President Barry Glassner, the Campus Activities Board, Dean of Students Anna Gonzalez, Student Activities, and Inclusion and Multicultural Engagement for…

An Evening with W. Kamau Bell

Monday, November 7th at 7pm
Agnes Flanagan Chapel

One (1) free ticket for Lewis & Clark students, faculty, and staff is available in advance (you’ll need to provide your L&C ID #). Each L&C student, faculty, or staff member is allowed to bring one (1) guest. Guest tickets are $25.00 each (plus at $2.25 service fee). You can get your ticket at https://lewisandclark.ticketleap.com/wkamaubell.
November 4, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 4, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 4, 2016

Social Justice Tours: Ray Warren Symposium and IME

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College.  Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.  Tour leaders recommend wearing clothes and shoes that are comfortable for an outdoor walk around campus in whatever weather is called for that day.  No RSVP needed.  Contact Luz Aguirre at luzaguirre@lclark.edu for additional information.
until November 4, 2016
November 3, 2016

Psychology Symposium

First Psychology Symposium!
November 3, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 3, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 3, 2016

Social Justice Tours: Ray Warren Symposium and IME

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College.  Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.  Tour leaders recommend wearing clothes and shoes that are comfortable for an outdoor walk around campus in whatever weather is called for that day.  No RSVP needed.  Contact Luz Aguirre at luzaguirre@lclark.edu for additional information.
until November 4, 2016
November 2, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 2, 2016

L&C Social Justice Tour

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College. Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.
November 2, 2016

Social Justice Tours: Ray Warren Symposium and IME

The Social Justice Tour highlights instances of student activism and social justice throughout the history of Lewis & Clark College.  Tours begin at Frank Manor House and last approximately 30 minutes.  Tour leaders recommend wearing clothes and shoes that are comfortable for an outdoor walk around campus in whatever weather is called for that day.  No RSVP needed.  Contact Luz Aguirre at luzaguirre@lclark.edu for additional information.
until November 4, 2016
October 20, 2016

Environmental Affairs Symposium: Voices and Choices Panel

This panel seeks to identify gaps in the perspectives and agendas that have characterized mainstream environmental discourse and action. It features: Chuck Sams (Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation), Dianne Glave (Western Pennsylvania Conference Center of the United Methodist Church), and Jay Odenbaugh (Lewis & Clark College).
October 19, 2016

Environmental Affairs Symposium: Dimensions of Development Panel

This panel aims to examine processes of development and their diverse consequences. It features: LaShandra Sullivan (Reed College), Maryann Bylander (Lewis & Clark College), Rocky Rohwedder (Sonoma State University), and Central City Concern.
October 19, 2016

Environmental Affairs Symposium: (Un)natural Disasters Panel

This panel highlights social, economic, and political conditions that allow hazards to be transformed into disasters for some communities and not others. It features: Andrew Bernstein (Lewis & Clark College), Anthony Oliver-Smith (University of Florida), and Steven Bullock (recently of Multnomah County).
October 11, 2016

Dr. Dawn Norfleet - Lecture

The Department of Music and Exploration and Discovery invite the Lewis & Clark community to join us as Dr. Norfleet gives a lecture and presentation on Black music and social justice from a historical and cultural perspective.
October 11, 2016

Call for Art! Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity

Call for Art for the 13th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity.

Home: Race, Place, and Belonging
October 10, 2016

Dr. Dawn Norfleet - Performance

Join us on Monday, October 10, 2016 at 7pm in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel as Los Angeles-based flutist, vocalist and composer, Dr. Dawn Norfleet presents a duo jazz concert of her original compositions and arrangements.
October 4, 2016

Call for Art! Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity

Call for Art for the 13th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity.

Home: Race, Place, and Belonging
October 3, 2016

Ethnic Studies Forum on General Education and Diversity

This forum will provide a space for discussing how we can accomplish the goal of prioritizing diversity in General Education.

 • What do we mean by diversity?

• How can we guarantee that all students graduating from L&C grapple with issues of      cultural difference and social power?

• Should exploring diversity be one of the goals of a core class like E & D?

 

born-in-flames-poster
September 26, 2016

E&D Film Screening & Discussion - Born in Flames

Miller 105
Is “the revolution” really so revolutionary if it ignores the concerns of poor women, queer people, and people of color? And what happens when the forgotten fight back? In grainy cinéma-vérité style, Lizzie Borden’s 1983 feminist sci-fi dystopian film Born in Flames asked these questions, at a moment when president Ronald Reagan promised “morning in America” while ushering in a culture war against society’s most marginalized. Featuring a DIY punk-rock soundtrack and aesthetic that influenced later waves of feminist musician-activists like Bikini Kill’s Kathleen Hanna, this “unruly, unclassifiable film,” as Village Voice writer Melissa Anderson has put it, “proves as bracing today as it was back when this country began its inexorable shift to the right.”

Exploration & Discovery Professor Dr. Sara Appel will facilitate the conversation and provide opening remarks.
April 25, 2016

Roy Saigo, Southern Oregon University President: Diversity, Inclusion & Higher Education Leadership

IME Presents:
Roy Saigo, President of Southern Oregon University, shares reflections from his experiences as a change agent for diversity and inclusion in higher education leadership.
April 20, 2016

Teacher of the Year Award Ceremony

The Pamplin Society of Fellows is proud to announce the finalists for the
2016 Teacher of the Year Award: Sepideh Bajracharya, Kimberly Brodkin, Casey Jones, Joel Martinez, Tamily Weissman-Unni

April 11, 2016

Electoral Politics: Where the Presidential and Portland Mayoral Candidates Stand

Join us for the last Black Lives Matter Forum of the semester sponsored by Ethnic Studies.
#chicagoGirl
April 11, 2016

Ala’a Basatneh - #chicagoGirl: The Social Network Takes On a Dictator

Exploration & Discovery is excited to be sponsoring the screening of the film #chicagoGirl and Ala’a Basatneh (the subject of the film) coming to campus to talk about her recent visit to the liberated territory in Syria.  We hope you can join us!

  • Showing the 74 minute film #chicagoGirl: The Social Network Takes On a Dictator
  • Presentation by Ala’a Basatneh
  • Q&A with Ala’a

This event is free and open to the Lewis & Clark Community.
The WA State Senate passes SR 8607 Honoring 2015 Depublic Day in India January 26, 2015, the 15th...
April 1, 2016

From Activist to Politican- Senator Pramila Jayapal

Pamplin Society of Fellows, Distinguished Visiting Scholar Senator Pramila Jayapal
March 31, 2016

Diversify the faculty?

Students - come join the Math Sciences Faculty for a discussion on diversification of the faculty.
March 17, 2016

Visiting Scholar: Reina Gossett on Trans Feminine BIPOC History, Resistance, and Prison Abolition

The Queer Student Union, in collaboration with the Campus Activity Board, Office of Inclusion & Multicultural Engagement, Ray Warren Symposium, and the Finance Committee are honored to present an evening with activist, artist, historian, writer, and educator Reina Gossett!!
March 9, 2016

35th Annual Gender Studies Symposium: Keynote event

Keynote event!
Do All Lives Matter on Saturday Night?: Race, Gender, and College Parties

David J. Leonard, professor and chair in the Department of Critical Culture, Gender, and Race Studies, Washington State University, Pullman
Dr. Daymond Glenn speaks at Lewis & Clark on March 1st at 7:30 p.m. in the Gregg Pavilion
March 1, 2016

Exploring the Intersections of Race, Faith, Hip-Hop and Justice

Dr. Daymond Glenn comes to Lewis & Clark College to speak in the Chamberlin Social Justice Forum.  His title is “A Theological Remix:  Exploring the Intersections of Race, Faith, Hip-Hop and Justice.”  Dr. Glenn is the Vice-President for Community Life and Chief Diversity Officer and Assistant Professor of Urban Studies at Warner Pacific College.
February 25, 2016

Healthy Masculinity Through a Racial Lens: A Workshop with Tiq Milan

Join IME for an evening with Tiq Milan an LGBT advocate, writer, journalist, and one of the leading voices for transgender equality in North America, on February 25th at 6 PM in Stamm!
February 22, 2016

Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories from Social Justice Movements. Reading & presentation with Walidah Imarisha

All organizing is science fiction. Those wanting to change the world must first be able to dream of new worlds. That’s where Octavia’s Brood: Science Fiction Stories From Social Justice Movements comes in. Join co-editor Walidah Imarisha for a reading and presentation/community conversation/discussion about radical science fiction and social change.
Sponsored by Ethnic Studies, Office of Inclusion and Multicultural Engagement, Gender Studies and English
February 6, 2016

Aasif Mandvi

Aasif Mandvi is well known for his work as a correspondent on Comedy Central’s Emmy-winning show, THE DAILY SHOW WITH JON STEWART.   Most recently, Aasif wrote, produced, and starred in the HBO series, THE BRINK, co-starring Jack Black and Tim Robbins. Brought to you by the President’s Office, Inclusion & Multicultural Engagement, and the Dean of Students Office.

February 5, 2016

“More Than A Score: The New Uprising Against Standardized Testing” Talk with educator and activist, Jesse Hagopian

Please join Jesse Hagopian, educator and activist, for his talk at Lewis & Clark College on February 5, 2016, at 5 pm in the Gregg Pavilion.
“More Than A Score: The New Uprising Against Standardized Testing”

February 1, 2016

Black Lives Matter: Diversity at Lewis & Clark College

Join us for the third in our panel series,
Black Lives Matter: Diversity at Lewis & Clark College
January 28, 2016

MLK Week: Stories of Intersectionality

Members of the Lewis & Clark community share their stories, thoughts, and reflections on relationship that their various identities have with their race
January 27, 2016

Preview & Artist Talk, Intersecciones: Havana/Portland

Preview & Artist talk. Join us for an opportunity to meet four of the artists who have travelled from Havana to Install site-specific work.
November 13, 2015

Race Monologues: 12th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnicity

Race Monologues

Each year a different group of L&C students writes an original series of personal narratives to share their feelings, experiences, and understandings of race, ethnicity, and identity.

November 12, 2015

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote Presentation

*Keynote Presentation
The Profound Threat of a good Idea: Ethnic Studies in Tucson and Beyond

Nolan L. Cabrera, assistant professor, University of Arizona College of Education
November 11, 2015

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies-Keynote event

Debate: What should be the role of affirmative action in higher education admissions?

Randall L. Kennedy, Michael R. Klein Professor, Harvard Law School
Linda Chavez, chair, Center for Equal Opportunity, a non-profit policy organization
November 4, 2015

Black Lives Matter: The Black Panthers and Their Legacy

Join us for the second panel on Black Lives Matter as we look back to the Black Panthers to understand their legacy as a black nationalist organization. To what extent is Black Lives Matter a legacy of the Black Panthers? In what ways does Black Lives Matter differ from the Black Panthers in terms of its internal structure as well as its goals? Join us at 5:30 at the council chamber to hear from our panelists. Q&A to follow.
October 29, 2015

A Fiction Reading by John Treat

John Whittier Treat, a native of New Haven, joined the Yale faculty in 1999 after teaching for eighteen years at the University of Washington, Berkeley, Stanford and Texas. He has been Professor Emeritus at Yale since 2014. He continues to teach courses in modern Japanese literature and criticism, and occasionally Korean studies and LGBT studies.  He has recently completed his first novel, The Rise and Fall of the Yellow House and is at work on a second, First Consonants.  This event is co-sponsored by the departments of English, History, and Gender Studies.
Left to right: Representatives Davis, Vega Pederson, and Frederick
October 29, 2015

OLMV State of Civil Rights Forum - 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act

6th Annual State of Civil Rights Forum Special Celebration - 50th Anniversary of the Voting Rights Act with State Representatives John Davis, Lew Frederick, and Jessica Vega Pederson who will be awarded for their work championing civil rights in our state this year.
October 27, 2015

Woman Peacemakers Walk for Peace in Korea

A talk by Gwyn Kirk, one of the peacemakers
October 24, 2015

LGBT Justice in the Black Lives Matter Movement

Saturday, October 24
9:00a.m. - 3:00p.m
October 23, 2015

“A New Paradigm of Anti-Racism: Why Discourse of White Privilege, Justice, and Equality Do Not Work” by Naomi Zack (University of Oregon)

Naomi Zack’s recent books are White Privilege and Black Rights: The Injustice of U.S. Police Racial Profiling and Homicide​ (2015), The Ethics and Mores of Race: Equality after the History of Philosophy  (2011), and Applicative Justice: A Pragmatic, Empirial Approach to Racial Injustice (2016). She now presents a new way to think about racial oppression and other forms of present injustice. She rejects White Privilege discourse, Rawlsian Ideal Theories of Justice, and the idea of Equality. Instead, Zack proposes a comparative approach––blacks should not be treated as whites are not treated.

PLEASE NOTE CHANGE IN LOCATION.  IT WILL NOW BE HELD IN THE GREGG PAVILLION.
October 1, 2015

BLACK LIVES MATTER SERIES: Politics, Identity and Intersectionality

Join us for the first panel of a series that will focus on arguably one of the most significant social movements of our day.

Contact: cjackson@lclark.edu for more information. Snacks will be provided!!

Sponsored by Ethnic Studies, Office of Inclusion and
Multicultural Engagement (IME) , and The Black Student Union.
Safiya Noble, PhD.
September 18, 2015

Johannah Sherrer Memorial Lecture

Safiya Umoja Noble, Ph.D, Assistant Professor in the UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies will present “Google Searching for Black Girls: Old Media Stereotypes in New Media Practices” Friday, September 18 at 3 p.m. in the Gregg Pavilion.

September 17, 2015

Julia Portela: Cuban Art Historian

Cuban art historian Julia Portela will introduce the six Cuban artists who will be part of an exhibition at the Hoffman Gallery, opening Jan. 26, 2016
September 4, 2015

10th Annual Pio Fair

10th Annual Pio Fair
Friday, September 4, 2015 ~ 4:30 to 7pm
Frank Manor House Estate Gardens

Welcome Week is presented by the Office of Student Activities
September 3, 2015

An Evening with Comedian Hari Kondabolu

Public Tickets are SOLD OUT!

Join Inclusion and Multicultural Engagement, Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon (APANO), and Student Activities for an Evening with Comedian Hari Kondabolu.

Hari Kondabolu is a Brooklyn-based, Queens-raised comic who the NY Times has called “one of the most exciting political comics in standup today.” In March 2014 he released his debut standup album “Waiting for 2042” on the indie-label Kill Rock Stars.

An Evening with Comedian Hari Kondabolu is free for Lewis & Clark students, faculty, and staff. Members of the general public can contact APANO for tickets available for purchase.

Doors open at 8:00pm

Just a quick reminder. Food and beverages of any type are not allowed in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel.

Welcome Week is presented by the Office of Student Activities
May 9, 2015

Commencement 2015

Congratulations to the Class of 2015!  
April 9, 2015

An Evening with Comedian: Hari Kondabolu

THIS EVENT HAS BEEN CANCELED. For community members who purchased tickets through APANO, APANO will be in touch with ticket-holders for refund information.

Please join us for a night of comedy with Hari Kondabolu on April 9th at 7pm (doors open at 6:30pm) in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel. Hari has been hailed by NY Times has “one of the most exciting political comics in stand-up today”
April 8, 2015

53rd International Affairs Symposium presents “The Digital Panopticon: Does Surveillance Protect Identity?”

What are the impacts of government surveillance programs on individuals in the post 9/11 era? Does large-scale state surveillance inhibit individual behavior by targeting specific identities? Or does it serve to protect these identities and freedom of expression by securing a state where civil liberties can thrive?
April 8, 2015

53rd International Affairs Symposium presents “Age of Discord: Questioning the Roots of Conflict”

Is conflict in the 21st century caused by a “Clash of Civilizations”? Are perceived differences in ethnicity, religion and nationality to blame? Or do corrupt governments and socio-economic structures incite these disputes by violating social contracts and ignoring discontent?
April 6, 2015

53rd International Affairs Symposium presents “I Pledge Allegiance: Navigating the Threat of Foreign Fighters”

With the rise of transnationalism, citizens are leaving their nations to fight for a cause that they believe is just (such as Americans and Europeans going to fight for ISIS). Should governments act to ameliorate the perceived threat by revoking the citizenship of these foreign fighters? Or is the depiction of them as traitors overblown?
April 2, 2015

An Evening with Walter Echo-Hawk

Join us for a free public lecture by Distinguished Visiting Law Professor and civil rights attorney Walter Echo-Hawk
March 11, 2015

Gender Studies Symposium, Keynote Presentation: Inderpal Grewal

Keynote Presentation: Towards a Feminist Critique of the Advanced Neoliberal Security State
Inderpal Grewal, Yale University professor, scholar of transnational/postcolonial feminisms, globalization, and human rights
March 6, 2015

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium
until March 6, 2015
March 5, 2015

SOAN COLLOQUIUM SERIES: Indigenous in the City: The Politics of Urban Mapuche Identity in Chile

Indigenous in the City: The Politics of Urban Mapuche Identity in Chile presented by Assistant Professor of Sociology SARAH WARREN.

 

March 5, 2015

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium
until March 6, 2015
March 4, 2015

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium

Lewis & Clark’s 1st Annual Middle East Studies Symposium
until March 6, 2015
February 21, 2015

Sister Outsider

Presenting SISTER OUTSIDER!

Sister Outsider Poetry is an award-winning duo representing two of the top three female slam poets in the world, Dominique Christina and Denice Frohman. Their tour marks the first time that two Women of the World Poetry Slam Champions have paired up. They have appeared on six national poetry slam finals stages and have six championships collectively.

Inspired by the life and work of Audre Lorde, they write and perform their “otherness” into the center and use spoken word as a tool for social change.
February 20, 2015

Cine Lit VIII Directors Panel

Lewis & Clark College is a proud sponsor of the tri-annual conference Cine Lit, which this year turns VIII.  Cine Lit is an academic conference that also brings directors from Spain and Latin America in conjunction with the Portland IFF.



As sponsors and organizers, we have the opportunity of bringing to campus one of the visiting directors. This year, however, we have the opportunity to bring two directorasMariana Chenillo and Celina Murga. Both directors will talk in a panel about film and gender in the Latin American context. 






Friday, Febuary 20th at 1pm, Miller 105
February 13, 2015

E&D Spring Film Screening & Panel - “Black Girl In Suburbia”

Screening of the documentary “Black Girl in Suburbia” following by panel.

Panel Guests:

  • Melissa Lowery, filmmaker
  • Traci Prinkki, documentary participant
  • Bridgette Hickey, LC student

This event is free and open to the Lewis & Clark Community

https://www.facebook.com/events/444533002367286/?ref_newsfeed_story_type=regular

photo by Scott Langly
February 4, 2015

An Evening with Sister Helen Prejean and the 20th Anniversary of the film, “Dead Man Walking”

Sister Helen Prejean has been instrumental in sparking national dialogue on the death penalty. Sister Helen is a member of the Congregation of St. Joseph and began working at Hope House from 1981 – 1984. During this time, she was asked to correspond with a death row inmate Patrick Sonnier at Angola. She agreed and became his spiritual adviser. After witnessing his execution, she wrote a book about the experience. The result was Dead Man Walking: An Eyewitness Account of the Death Penalty in the United States.
Oscar Winner: Susan Sarandon, Best Actress in a Leading Role (1996 Academy Awards)
January 28, 2015

Screening of “Dead Man Walking” in preparation for Sr. Helen Prejean’s LC Visit

Please join us for this special free screening of the Oscar-winning film, Dead Man Walking, in preparation of Sister Helen Prejean’s visit to Lewis & Clark College on February 4, 2015.

 

January 22, 2015

From MLK to Michael Brown #blacklivesmatter A Social Justice Teach-in

LC Community members with an advanced understanding of racial justice will participate in a Social Justice Teach-in, facilitated by local academics and activists (and activist academics).  The goal of the Teach-in is to increase individual knowledge and capacity to work for racial justice.

 

January 21, 2015

Screening and Discussion of “Anne Braden: Southern Patriot”

Please join us for this free screening and discussion of the documentary, “Anne Braden: Southern Patriot” as part of MLK Week.

 

January 20, 2015

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

Lewis & Clark College students, staff, and faculty will do readings of Dr. King’s writings and speeches, paired with jazz music from Devin Phillips, a jazz musician from New Orleans.  Additionally, LC community members will share favorite and original works around this year’s theme: “We are the ones we have been waiting for.”
November 30, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 29, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 28, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 27, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 26, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 25, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 24, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 23, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 22, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 21, 2014

Second Annual Bingo Night Fundraiser

Please join the Native American Law Student Association (NALSA) for a Bingo Night Fundraiser! Each year NALSA helps send a group of passionate students to the Federal Bar Association’s Indian Law Conference. Come enjoy multiple rounds of bingo, prizes, and Indian Tacos! Students, practitioners, staff and guests are encouraged to attend!
November 21, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 20, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 19, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 18, 2014

“Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements”

Co-Author Karina Kloos, will speak about a new book entitled Deeply Divided: Racial Politics and Social Movements in Post-War America. 
November 18, 2014

Change or Charity? Exploring the Potential Unintended Consequences of Doing Good

When many of us see individuals struggling or widespread social problems, we are compelled to intervene. What happens, however, when we don’t utilize a critical lens to examine the potential unintended consequences of our well-intentioned actions? This interactive workshop will interrogate the differences between charity and change. Together, we will develop best change practices for social justice advocates and activists.

November 18, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 17, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 16, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 15, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 14, 2014

11th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies - Race Monologues

Keynote Event


7 pm, Agnes Flanagan Chapel
Race Monologues

















 
November 14, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 13, 2014

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies Keynote Event

Keynote Event

Securing Beauty by Mimi Thi Nguyen,
Associate Professor of Gender and Women’s Studies and Asian American Studies, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

November 13, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 12, 2014

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies Keynote Event

Keynote Event



7 pm, Templeton Campus Center, Council Chamber


Blackness and Beauty: Style, Hair Politics, and Colorism

November 12, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 11, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 10, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 9, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 8, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 7, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 6, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 5, 2014

93 Year Old Tuskegee Airmen Lt Col Alex Jefferson to Speak at Lewis & Clark College

Lt. Col. Alexander Jefferson, is a 93 year old retired US Air Force officer, and one of the famous “Tuskegee Airmen”, also known as the 332nd Fighter Group. During World War II, Black Americans throughout the U.S. were subject to Jim Crow laws which legalized segregation and the American military was also segregated. President Truman signed an executive order ending segregation in the military in 1948 (3 years after the war’s end). Lt. Col. Jefferson’s book, “Red Tail Captured, Red Tail Free: Memoirs of a Tuskegee Airman and POW”, is a personal memoir of those who served America in World War II and after. 

Please join us for this very special opportunity. Lt Col Alexander Jefferson will speak from 7-8pm in the Chapel at Lewis & Clark College.  A book-signing and reception will follow. The event is free and open to the public.

November 5, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 4, 2014

Dr Joseph Graves

Dr. Joseph Graves an evolutionary biologist and scholar of the history and philosophy of science as it relates to the biology of race. His visit is cosponsored by Departments of Biology, Psychology, Philosophy, the Ethnic Studies Program, and Science without Limits.
November 4, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
November 3, 2014

Featured Items: How Do I Look? Race, Beauty, and Desire

This month, check out Watzek’s Featured Items for a selection of books that support the themes of L&C’s 11th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium. Browse our display in the library atrium or on Pinterest and consider how our notions of beauty are framed by racial ideologies, economic forces, and politics.
until November 30, 2014
Leonardo Padura. Autor. En su estudio en La Habana, Cuba.
October 31, 2014

Escribir en Cuba en el silo XXI (Writing in Cuba in the 21st Century) by Leonardo Padura

Please join us for a lecture by renowned novelist Leonardo Padura. The lecture will be given in Spanish with a simultaneous English interpretation. This event is sponsored by Lewis & Clark Colleges’ Departments of History, Hispanic Studies, Latin American Studies, Latino and Iberian Studies Association (LALISA), and the NEH Arts and Lectures Fund.
October 27, 2014

Screening of Jose Antonio Vargas’ film, “Documented” and Panel

In 2011, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Jose Antonio Vargas outed himself as an undocumented immigrant in an essay published in the TheNew York Times Magazine.

Documented chronicles his journey to America from the Philippines as a child; his journey through America as an immigration reform activist; and his journey inward as he reconnects with his mother, whom he has not seen in person in over 20 years. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion and reception.

October 23, 2014

Phusiri Marka Ensemble - Andean Musical Heritage Performance

Andean musical heritage perfomance.
Traditional panpipe, tarka, and orquesta from the Chilean Andes
September 18, 2014

Hispanic? Latino? Chicano? What’s the Difference?

Hispanic? Latino? Chicano?  What’s the difference among these terms?  Which one(s) do you use and why? Which one(s) have been used to describe you? 

Join community activist Sean Aaron Cruz for an engaging discussion and history of each of these terms. Snacks and drinks will be provided.  Free and open to everyone.  

This event is part of the IME’s Heritage Month programming.

Photo by VICE News/Alice Speri
September 11, 2014

Beyond Ferguson - Conversation and Action

Please join Lewis & Clark Professor Reiko Hillyer, S. Bobbin Singh, J.D., Executive Director Oregon Justice Resource Center, and community activists Giovanni Blair McKenzie and Lakeitha Elliott for “Beyond Ferguson - Conversation and Action.”  Each panelist will share information; then, we will shift to community conversation about reactions and action steps we each can take. This event is free and open to the public.
April 24, 2014

Korean Movie Night- A Tale of Two Sisters

Each Thursday in April, Scholar in Residence, Pil Ho Kim will be showing a different Korean Film.
April 24, 2014

Reading: Mitchell S. Jackson

Join us on Thursday, April 24 at 3:30 p.m. in the Library Classroom, when author and educator Mitchell S. Jackson will read from his book The Residue Years, an autobiographical novel about coming of age in Northeast Portland during the 1990s.
April 17, 2014

Korean Movie Night- Secret Sunshine

Each Thursday in April, Scholar in Residence, Pil Ho Kim will be showing a different Korean Film.
Vanport is a relatively unknown element of Portland's history - in 1942 it was the largest public...
April 13, 2014

It’s been a bumpy ride: Housing Discrimination in Portland, Bus Tour

RSVP for a three hour bus tour lead by the Fair Housing Council of Oregon that will highlight how Oregon’s history of racism has shaped, and continues to shape, the geography of the greater Portland area.
April 10, 2014

Korean Movie Night- The Game of Their Lives

Each Thursday in April, Scholar in Residence, Pil Ho Kim will be showing a different Korean Film.
April 3, 2014

Korean Movie Night- Daytime Drinking

Each Thursday in April, Scholar in Residence, Pil Ho Kim will be showing a different Korean Film.
March 20, 2014

Tibet’s Linguistic Minorities in the Twenty-first Century: Survival or Assimilation

Gerald Roche, Post Doctoral Research Fellow at Uppsala University will be presenting a talk about his research on language diversity in Tibet.
March 3, 2014

A Conversation with Attorney Joshua Safran About the Victimization & the Shifting Nature of Identity in the Criminal Justice System

NCVLI and the Crime Victims’ Rights Alliance are pleased to co-sponsor this event at the Lewis & Clark Law School.Joshua Safran is an attorney who is featured in the Film Crime After Crime and Author of Free Spirit: Growing Up On the Road and Off the Grid, a memoir about his childhood. 
London School of Economics graduate, Cat Goughnour, on race, justice and sustainability
February 25, 2014

“Toward Community: On Racial Justice, Inclusion and Sustainability” presented by Cat Goughnour

“Toward Community: On Racial Justice, Inclusion and Sustainability” presented by Cat Goughnour
February 6, 2014

“Do (Muslim) Girls Really Need Saving?”

“Do (Muslim) Girls Really Need Saving?
Taking the Rock Camp Model of Girls’ Empowerment to Bahrain”

January 20, 2014

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Celebration

MLK Jr. Week of Service kick-off celebration
November 15, 2013

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Keynote Event:
Race Monologues
November 15, 2013

10th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Join us for three days of events exploring issues of race, ethnicity, and the carceral state.
November 13-15, 2013

All events free and open to the public. Most events held in Templeton Campus Center.
November 14, 2013

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Police States Prison Nations
Panel Discussion:  “Pushed Out, Left Behind: The School-to-Prison Pipeline”
November 14, 2013

10th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Join us for three days of events exploring issues of race, ethnicity, and the carceral state.
November 13-15, 2013

All events free and open to the public. Most events held in Templeton Campus Center.
November 13, 2013

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Keynote Event:
Paul Butler, professor of law, Georgetown University Law Center
“A Hip-Hop Theory of Justice”
November 13, 2013

Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Undocumented, Unafraid! Stories from the Front Lines of the Fight for Migrant Justice

Presenters:  Dulce Guerrero
and Luis Leon, members of National Immigrant Youth Alliance (NIYA) and Dream Activists
November 13, 2013

10th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies

Join us for three days of events exploring issues of race, ethnicity, and the carceral state.
November 13-15, 2013

All events free and open to the public. Most events held in Templeton Campus Center.
November 6, 2013

Oregon Ban on Indian Mascots

In May 2012, Oregon State Board of Education banned the use of Indian mascots in public schools. What is the issue with Indian mascots? How does this ban affect Oregon schools? How is the community responding?
November 1, 2013

Gender and Politics in the New Middle East

Gender and Politics in the New Middle East- A Panel Discussion
Friday, November 1st,4:00 – 5:30 PM in JRH 202

October 30, 2013

Why Are There So Few Black People in Oregon?

Why Are There So Few Black People in Oregon?A Hidden History Presented by Walidah Imarisha, educator, writer, activist, and spoken word artist
September 30, 2013

Arsalan Iftikhar

Arsalan Iftikhar is an international human rights lawyer, global media commentator, and author of Islamic Pacifism: Global Muslims in the Post-Osama Era
September 30, 2013

Muslim Identity in Post 9/11 America: Islam, Race, and U.S. Civil Rights

A lecture and book signing event featuring Arsalan Iftikhar. Sponsored by the Department of Inclusion & Multicultural Engagement.
September 5, 2013

Fulbright Grant Informational Meeting

If you have started your Fulbright application, or plan to apply, this meeting will answer all your questions. 
April 25, 2013

Cultural Politics of Memory: Why Tank Man Still Matters

Research talk by Jennifer Hubbert, Assistant Professor of Anthroplogy
April 14, 2013

15th Annual Fiesta De Salsa

Come learn to salsa dance and enjoy great food and festive music! Dance instruction will be from 9:00-10:30 followed by an open dance session from 10:30 to 12. There will also be $150 worth of prizes to give away!
until April 14, 2013
April 13, 2013

15th Annual Fiesta De Salsa

Come learn to salsa dance and enjoy great food and festive music! Dance instruction will be from 9:00-10:30 followed by an open dance session from 10:30 to 12. There will also be $150 worth of prizes to give away!
until April 14, 2013
March 19, 2013

Okinawan Identity in the Japanization of Karate: Emptying the Tang Hand

LC Alumnus, Craig Colbeck will be giving a talk on his recent research.
March 15, 2013

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event

Queer Rituals
Melissa M. Wilcox, Associate Professor and Chair of Religion and Director of Gender Studies, Whitman College, “Serious Parody: Religion and Politics in the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence”
Rev. Dr. Patrick S. Cheng, Associate Professor of Historical and Systematic Theology, Episcopal Divinity School, “Rainbow Theology: Bridging Race, Sexuality, and Spirit”
Noach Dzmura, rabbinical pastor and director, “Buried Real: The Chevra Kadisha (Burial Society) and the Gender-Variant Meit/ah (deceased)”
March 14, 2013

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event

“We Make This Bridge By Walking It: Muslim Women and Authority in Islam
Amina Wadud, scholar of Islamic studies
March 13, 2013

Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event

“How Clinging to Gender Subverts Enlightenment”
Rita Gross, Buddhist scholar and senior teacher
February 25, 2013

The 50th Annual Arthur L. Throckmorton Memorial Lecture

Improving the Human Race One Gene at a Time: The Curious History of Eugenics in the Twentieth Century
February 20, 2013

Film Screenings: Classic Cinema on the Black Struggle

Black Heritage Celebration
Leigh Raiford
February 18, 2013

Keynote Lecture: Leigh Raiford, Ph.D.

Black Heritage Celebration
January 21, 2013

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration

MLK Celebration: Day 1 of 4
November 12, 2012

Precious Knowledge Film & Discussion, Looking at the Removal of “Ethnic Studies” from the Tucson Unified School District

What began as a studies program with a national model of educational success soon became a controversial issue of civil liberties and racial profiling. 
November 9, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

7:00 pm, Stamm Dining Room, Templeton Campus Center
Race Monologues 
November 9, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Panel Discussion
3:30-5:00 pm, Stamm

Trading in Race: The Business of Multicultural Marketing 
November 9, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Panel Discussion
1:45-3:15 pm, Stamm

Whose News?: Race, Reporting, and Identity 
November 9, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Panel Discussion
11:30 am-1:00 pm, Thayer

Student Brown Bag: Researching Race and Ethnicity

Join us for an interdisciplinary discussion with students who will share original research related to culture, identity, and the modern era.  Coffee and cookies will be provided.  Bring your lunch. 
November 9, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

This year’s symposium will examine issues of race and ethnicity in connection with media and communication.  In a three-day series of panel discussions and lectures, we will explore the role of media technology in shaping individual self-definition and cross-cultural interaction.  
November 8, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

“Why Is That Black Hunger Games Character Black?  Looking At Race, Identity, and the Interwebs”
Baratunde Thurston
, author of How To Be Black and former director of digital for The Onion

7 pm, Council Chamber, Templeton Campus Center 
November 8, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Panel Discussion
1:45-3:15 pm, Stamm
Going Viral: Popular Culture in the Digital Age
November 8, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

This year’s symposium will examine issues of race and ethnicity in connection with media and communication.  In a three-day series of panel discussions and lectures, we will explore the role of media technology in shaping individual self-definition and cross-cultural interaction. 
November 7, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

“Politics 2.0: Mobilizing Race and Identity in the Age of Social Media”

Merlyna Lim, Assistant Professor, Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes and the School of Social Transformation, Arizona State University

7 pm, Council Chamber, Templeton Campus Center 
November 7, 2012

9th Annual Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

This year’s symposium will examine issues of race and ethnicity in connection with media and communication.  In a three-day series of panel discussions and lectures, we will explore the role of media technology in shaping individual self-definition and cross-cultural interaction.  
October 24, 2012

Political Economy Program Event

Political Economy Program Event
October 23, 2012

Jose Antonio Vargas Lecture: “Define American”

Jose Antonio Vargas is a Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, as well as an undocumented citizen from the Philippines. Since his declaration of his status in the New York Times, Vargas created the ‘Define American’ campaign to raise awareness about immigration issues. Learn his unique and inspiring story.
October 3, 2012

Hispanic Heritage Month: Short Film Series

Come and watch three thought provoking and powerful short films (Immersion, The New Los Angeles, and Tia and Marco) that highlight relevant issues faced by many Hispanic populations in the United States. A question and answer segment is to follow directly after the films! 
September 25, 2012

Teatro Milagro Presents: B’aktun 13

Come experience the theater production B’aktun 13, produced by Teatro
Milagro, in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month! Teatro Milagro tours
the nation with original bilingual theatre productions and
educational residencies, reaching diverse and underserved communities
across the nation. Current global issues are crafted into cutting
edgedramatic plays infused with Latino culture, Spanish language
and original music.
September 20, 2012

Novo Anniversary Collection exhibit opening

Reynier Leyva Novo, the only Cuban artist chosen to exhibit at the Latin American pavilion of the prestigious 54th Venice Biennial, is coming to Portland.  
September 12, 2012

Multicultural and International Student Reception with President Glassner

The Annual President’s Reception to welcome multicultural, international, and TCK students is happening Thursday, Sept. 12th from 4:30 to 6:00 in the Manor House. President Glassner is hosting in your honor, and hors d’oeuvres and drinks will be served.
September 10, 2012

Multicultural Resource Center Open House

The Multicultural Resource Center is hosting an Open House from 1pm to 4pm on Monday Sept, 10. The Open House is an event that showcases the student space and gives students an opportunity to drop by, meet staff, learn about the space’s many uses, and get a free t-shirt!
September 8, 2012

Mosaic Welcome Back Barbecue

Come learn about the new student organization, Multicultural Organizations Seeking An Inclusive Campus (MOSAIC). Connect with the members and hear about their upcoming events, all while enjoying some good eats!
April 20, 2012

Dorothy Berkson Writing Award in Gender Studies

Join us in recognizing award recipients Kemiyondo Coutinho and Kathryn Kucera AND our graduating Gender Studies Minors.
April 19, 2012

Some Na Ceremonies

East Asian Studies Film Screening and Q & A with Tami Blumenfield
April 17, 2012

Author Lac Su: “I Love Yous Are For White People”

Author Lac Su presents, “Love Comes In Many Faces”, a discussion about his heart-wrenching, irreverent, and ultimately uplifting memoir, I Love Yous Are for White People. 
Robert Terrill
April 17, 2012

RHMS COLLOQUIUM

SPEAKER: ROBERT TERRILL, “Barack Obama and the Civil Rights Movement: A Bridge Too Far?”  
 
Fiesta De Salsa
April 15, 2012

14th Annual Fiesta de Salsa

A Classy Affair with the Copeland RA Staff, Spanish Club, Dean of Students Office, Office of Campus Living, Office of Multicultural Affairs, and Hispanic Studies. Enjoy great food, music, and dance instruction.
until April 15, 2012
Fiesta De Salsa
April 14, 2012

14th Annual Fiesta de Salsa

A Classy Affair with the Copeland RA Staff, Spanish Club, Dean of Students Office, Office of Campus Living, Office of Multicultural Affairs, and Hispanic Studies. Enjoy great food, music, and dance instruction.
until April 15, 2012
Vanessa Paloma
April 3, 2012

Concert: Songs From the Tip of Africa

Vanessa Paloma Concert:  Songs From the Tip of Africa: Judeo-Spanish Music from Sephardic Morocco
April 3, 2012

7th Annual Multicultural Affairs Banquet

“Celebrating Pathways & Purpose”
March 22, 2012

Overseas Program Ambassador Meet & Greet

Join students who have studied abroad through Lewis & Clark to get advice about choosing programs, preparing for your study abroad experience, and living in a foreign country!  Coffee, tea and desserts will be provided.  
March 19, 2012

Roundtable Discussion: Layers of Identity

Why is identity a social relationship? How do we reconcile the idea of self in our identity? When does identity become intersectional and simultaneous? How do issues of race, gender, ethnicity, sexuality, religion, and ability status overlap and impact our perception of others? Join us as we discuss these questions and more during this community roundtable.
OBJECTION!  Gender, Sex, Law, and Social Change
March 15, 2012

31st Annual Gender Studies Symposium Keynote Event

Keynote Event
“Invisible Crimes, Inadequate Remedies: Uncovering Police Profiling and Brutality Against Women and LGBTQ People of Color
Andrea Ritchie,
 police misconduct attorney and activist
March 3, 2012

47th Annual International Fair

Join us for the 47th Annual International Fair for international food, cultural displays, a fashion show, and many performances.
BHM
February 23, 2012

Film in Focus: Black Fatherhood Project

Filmmaker Jordan Thierry offers context and conversation in this honest exploration of fatherhood in Black America. Thierry traces the roots of the fatherless Black household and reveals a history much more complex and profound than is often told.
February 23, 2012

Community Roundtable: Whiteness and Black Identity

Students, faculty and community guests are invited to join a discussion about the politics and social effects of “whiteness” in the formation of black racial identity, and what it means to be “black” in today’s post-racial society.
February 14, 2012

Black History Month Keynote: Ericka Huggins

Ericka Huggins is a human rights activist, poet, professor, and former Black Panther leader and political prisoner. For the past 25 years, she has lectured throughout the United States, where her extraordinary life experiences have enabled her to speak personally and eloquently on issues relating to the physical and emotional well-being of women and children, youth, education, incarceration, and the role of the spiritual practice in sustaining activism and promoting change.
February 9, 2012

Film in Focus - Merritt College: Home of the Black Panthers (DATE CHANGE)

A comprehensive and informative historical documentary on one of the most controversial and transformative social movements in America. Featuring Bobby Seale, Richard Aoki, David Hillard, Emory Douglas, Elbert “Big Man” Howard and this year’s BHM keynote speaker, Ericka Huggins. Enjoy snacks and a post-film discussion. (DATE CHANGE from Weds, Feb. 8th to THURSDAY, Feb 9th)
January 27, 2012

Freedom Riders & Fighters

Traveling museum exhibit that vividly tells the story of the 1961 Freedom Rides and the stories of local Portland Freedom Riders and Fighters illustrated with archival photos and clippings that document an event that changed America forever. 
until January 27, 2012
January 26, 2012

Freedom Riders & Fighters

Traveling museum exhibit that vividly tells the story of the 1961 Freedom Rides and the stories of local Portland Freedom Riders and Fighters illustrated with archival photos and clippings that document an event that changed America forever. 
until January 27, 2012
MLK Photo March on Washington
January 19, 2012

MLK Lecture with Stephen Manning, Immigrant Law Group, PC

“When We Become the Other”
January 19, 2012

Global Flows and Minority Media Production in Southwest China

Research talk with Tami Blumenfeld
MLK Photo March on Washington
January 18, 2012

MLK Lecture with Monica Miller, Mellon Post-Doctoral Fellow for Religious Studies

“Dreams, Nightmares, & ImPossibilities: The holla  in the hope  of Black Religion”
MLK Photo March on Washington
January 17, 2012

MLK Lecture with Dyan Watson, Assistant Professor of Education

“Talking Back to Educational Inequalities: A Letter From a Black Mom to Her Son”
MLK Photo March on Washington
January 16, 2012

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Annual Celebration

Community readings from Dr. King’s speeches and a candlelight vigil. Gospel by Northeast Community Fellowship Foursquare Church Praise Team
January 16, 2012

MLK Jr. Day of Service

The MLK Day of Service is a higher education cooperative that builds community by teaching and educating about the beliefs of Dr. Martin Luther King through direct service that impacts the places we live, work, and study. 

The MLK Day of Service will take place Monday, January 16, 2012. This service day is a multi-institutional collaboration among colleges and universities in the greater-Portland metro. In 2011, over 1200 students and community members participated in the MLK Day of Service. 
December 8, 2011

Kwanzaa Celebration

A joyful holiday gathering celebrating the African-American Cultural tradition of the Kwanzaa holiday.








Kwanzaa, the first specifically designated African-American holiday, began in 1966 and is centered on the seven principles of Kwanzaa, an African culture-centered ritual that observes and promotes Unity (Umoja), Self-Determination (Kujichagulia), Collective Work and Responsibility (Ujima), Cooperative Economics (Ujamaa), Purpose (Nia), Creativity (Kuumba) and Faith (Imani).



 

December 1, 2011

Growing Up Policed: Surveilling Racialized Sexualities

This daylong conference uses a recent legal case that occurred in Portland, Oregon to highlight how young people marginalized through sexuality and race are targeted.

Growing Up Policed aims to address the overarching question of how queer youth of color and their allies use their allies, their communities, and themselves to help their relationships and themselves to safely flourish.
November 22, 2011

Film Screening: The Doe Boy

In conjunction with Native American and Alaskan Heritage Month, the Office of Multicultural Affairs is screening the award-winning film THE DOE BOY, a coming-of-age story of a young Cherokee boy with mixed heritage who suffers from hemophilia. The film examines issues of mixed-race politics, cultural preservation, and self-identity. THE DOE BOY was the first feature film from writer and director Randy Redroad, and  was based on his own experiences growing up in a Native American family; the film was shown in competition at the 2001 Sundance Film Festival where Redroad won the Filmmaker’s Award.


Co-Sponsored by Dr. Maureen Reed’s Exploration and Discovery class. 
November 15, 2011

Sustaining Cultural Lifeways: Sovereignty, Identity, and development in the Native Community

Join the Office of Multicultural Affairs at this panel discussion as part of Native American Heritage Month. Panelists will discuss issues surrounding cultural sovereignty and tribal identity, economic and community development, and the role of social media and the digital age.
November 11, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium: Race Monologues

Keynote Event:
Race Monologues 
 In poetry and prose, Lewis & Clark students express their understandings of race, ethnicity, and identity.  Each year a new group of students writes an original series of monologues to share powerful feelings and experiences.  Join us for what is always a highlight of the Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium.
November 11, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium: Student Research Brown Bag Discussion

Student Research Brown Bag Discussion 
Student projects on culture, identity and the modern experience.  Join us for an interdisciplinary discussion with the students who are developing research projects drawn from topics of interest related to the modern multicultural experience. 
Bring your lunch.  Drinks and cookies will be provided.

Welcome by: Latricia Brand, Interim Dean of Students,
Director of Multicultural Affairs
Emily Katzman, L&C ‘12, “Black Power: A Transnational History of Aboriginal Australian Activism, 1968-1974”
 Alison Dubchansky, L&C ‘12, “Bilingual Children as Language Brokers: Role Reversals, Language Choice, and Identity Development”
Lu’ukia Nakanelua
, L&C ‘13, “Reclaiming Space in Post-modern Los Angeles: Freeways and their Chicano Murals”
November 10, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Keynote Event: 
“Multiculturalism in U.S. Education: Critical Perspectives From the Inside”
Gary Okihiro, professor of international and public affairs, Columbia University and
Geneva Gay, professor of education, University of Washington-Seattle
November 10, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium: Panel Discussion

Talking About Race: The Language We Use in Our Classrooms and Communities
What is the rhetoric used surrounding race? How do the choices we make in language influence and inform our social interactions? What should we expect for the future of dialogue about race? This panel discusses how social dynamics impact the way individuals choose (not) to engage over issues of race, culture and ethnicity. Strategies for improving our discourse will also be discussed. 
November 10, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium: Ethnic Studies Colloquium: “Race, Place, and Power”

Ethnic Studies Colloquium: “Race, Place, and Power” 
November 9, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Keynote Lecture: 
“Multiculturalism in Europe: The Fictions We Fear and the Facts We Celebrate”
Gary Younge, author and columnist for The Guardian(UK) 
November 9, 2011

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Panel Discussion:
Beyond the Word: Exploring the Meaning of Multiculturalism Today
October 31, 2011

¡Día de los Muertos!

Come celebrate with us and enjoy Mexican hot chocolate, chips and salsa, face painting, learn how to make pan de muerto (Day of the Dead bread), decorate candles, and take part in this celebration for the dead! Traditionally, Latin American cultures honor their loved ones who have passed away by making an altar for their loved ones. The altar consists of pictures, flowers, bread, fruits, drinks, and anything that was dear to those who have passed away. If you would like to participate bring a picture of someone who has passed away and place it on the altar (ex. A picture of Steve Jobs). This is not just a commemoration of the dead, but a celebration of death we have cheated by living another day. Since it will be on Halloween, you can feel free to wear your costume and add a little Halloween flare to it!

GLU signature event brought to you by MOSAIC, The Latin American Solidarity Committee, and the Spanish Club. 
October 18, 2011

Meet Your Minor!

Ethnic Studies and Gender Studies Informational Meeting
October 13, 2011

Panel Discussion: Immigration and Education in the Latino Community

Join the Office of Multicultural Affairs for a panel discussion about issues of Immigration and education in the Latino community, with a focus on college access, bilingual education, and the DREAM Act.  

Panelists include: Alejandra Favela, (Associate Professor of Education/Director, ESOL/Bilingual Endorsement Program at Lewis & Clark), Linda Liu (Program Director for PSU TRiO - Student Support Services), and Ronault Catalani (Program Coordinator for New Portlanders)
October 10, 2011

Environmental Affairs Symposium - Building a City Kickoff Workshop

Citisphere: the 14th Annual Symposium - Join us in building a city out of found objects and learn about challenges in urban planning.
October 4, 2011

“El Norte” Movie Screening

“El Norte” tells the story of a Guatemalan brother and sister who flee persecution at home and journey north the length of Mexico with a dream of finding a new home in the United States.

This screening is co-sponsored by Gente Latina Unida and the Office of Multicultural Affairs. In conjunction with Professor Mechlinski’s “Immigrant America” class.
Andrew Austin-Dailey, M.Div., M.S.
September 28, 2011

Money and Mentoring: Essentials for Your Career

Students and faculty of color are invited to join Andrew Austin-Dailey, director of the Minority Fellowship Program, for this for this discussion on mentoring and navigating institutions of higher education.
September 22, 2011

Award-Winning Gender Diversity Documentary “Two Spirits” - Screening and Panel Discussion

Join us for the screening of “Two Spirits”, an award-winning documentary that explores the cultural context behind the tragic and senseless murder of Fred Martinez. Fred was part of an honored Navajo tradition - the ‘nadleeh’, or ‘two-spirit’, who possess a balance of masculine and feminine traits. Through telling Fred’s story, Nibley reminds us of the values that America’s indigenous peoples have long embraced. The screening will be followed by a panel discussion.

Co-sponsored by the Two Spirit Society, Indigenous Ways of Knowing (IWOK) and the Office of Multicultural Affairs.
September 19, 2011

Academic Awards & Fellowships Information Session

Interested in applying for a Fulbright or a Truman but not sure where to begin? Come learn about the available fellowships and scholarships!
September 18, 2011

Race Monologues Second Meeting

You have a story? We want you to share it. No experience needed….except for your own!

What are Race Monologues?
 It is a presentation of voices expressing what it is to live in one’s skin, ethnicity, diversity. The oratory mediums vary from spoken-word to story-telling, from poetry to actual dialog. However, all of the pieces are written by the presenters themselves.

If you would like to take part you MUST come to the meeting on Sunday 18th in Thayer at 6pm. If you would like to take part but for whatever reason cannot make it email kkc@lclark.edu
September 15, 2011

Duende de Lorca - a bilingual play by Teatro Milagro

Federico García Lorca is celebrated the world over for his poetry, music and plays. Yet at the age of 27, he was still a struggling artist living with his parents, staging puppet plays that were laughed off the stage by the critics.  His need for freedom fueled his desire to succeed.  In search of duende, his travels through New York and Cuba became a quest for cultural integration and gender acceptance.  Duende de Lorca follows the early years of Federico’s early successes from the opening night of Mariana Pineda, followed by the printing of Gypsy Ballads and Poet in New York.  Audiences will share in his triumphs and failures and his relationships with Salvador Dali, Melchor Almagro, Emilio Aladren and others as his journey from New York to Cuba shapes his life and his art.
September 15, 2011

Journeys - a tolerance teaching workshop by Teatro Milagro

Teatro Milagro’s theater performance, Duende de Lorca (7pm in Council Chambers) is accompanied by “Journeys” tolerance teaching workshops that celebrate “individuality” and acceptance of others, through an exploration of metaphors and poetry writing.   This “Journeys” workshop will precede the Duende de Lorca performances at 4 pm.  
May 6, 2011

Honors Convocation

Annual recognition of academic honors for students.
April 29, 2011

Faculty Retirement Reception

Annual reception for retiring faculty members.
April 15, 2011

Gender Studies Brown Bag

“SUPPORTING SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT”
Cockroftonline
April 7, 2011

Mexico’s Revolution Then and Now

Talk by Mexican historian J. Cockroft
US-Mexico Relations: Failed States, New Wars, Resistance
March 9, 2011

Heidi Durrow Reads “The Girl Who Fell From The Sky”

Author of “The Girl Who Fell From the Sky” comes to Lewis & Clark
February 23, 2011

Black History Month Closing Reception

African American Studies Expert from Emory University, Rudolph P. Byrd (LC ‘75) as Special Guest.
February 22, 2011

Community Panel: Black Identity in a “Colorblind” Society

Student, faculty and community panel discussion.
Book cover, now available in paperback.
January 27, 2011

OMA Reads (Book Club)

The new “OMA Reads” book club, which explores and discusses engaging books, both fiction and non-fiction. Our first author selected (Heidi Durrow) will visit Lewis & Clark on March 10th.
Michele Norris, Host of NPR's All Things Considered
January 21, 2011

Michele Norris: The Grace of Silence

As part the week’s observance of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday and the commencement of our Black History Month celebration, the Office of Multicultural Affairs invites you to hear Michele Norris, Host of NPR’s “All Things Considered” and author of the new memoir The Grace of Silenceon January 21 at 4 p.m. in Council Chamber.
January 21, 2011

Gender Studies Brown Bag “Meet & Greet”

Gender Studies Information Social for program minors, other interested students, and faculty.
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.   March from Selma to Montgomery.
January 18, 2011

Going to the Mountaintop: King & the Civil Rights Movement

Participate in this reflective and interactive Walking Exhibit in Templeton Campus Center. Part of our annual observance and celebration of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. 
until January 18, 2011
Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.   March from Selma to Montgomery.
January 17, 2011

Going to the Mountaintop: King & the Civil Rights Movement

Participate in this reflective and interactive Walking Exhibit in Templeton Campus Center. Part of our annual observance and celebration of the Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. holiday. 
until January 18, 2011
Amer Ahmed
December 10, 2010

Islam, Race & Hip Hop: A Social Justice Perspective

Amer Ahmed, (a.k.a. Dawah Poet), will discuss the effectiveness of hip-hop and spoken word to inform community discourse, specifically in regards to breaking down myths and misconceptions around Islam.

A small group discussion to process the recent events at Pioneer Courthouse Square will immediately follow his lecture.
November 17, 2010

Gender Studies Film Series: “Made in L.A.”

2008 National Emmy Winner documentary about three L. A. immigrant garment workers shows us how activists are made, working together to build a more just world.
November 12, 2010

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Join us for the seventh annual Ray Warren multicultural symposium, And Justice For All.
November 11, 2010

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Join us for the seventh annual Ray Warren multicultural symposium, And Justice For All.
November 10, 2010

Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Join us for the seventh annual Ray Warren multicultural symposium, And Justice For All.
October 28, 2010

Ethnic Studies presents: The Price of Free Expression?

A roundtable debate for Lewis & Clark faculty, students, and staff about the values of free speech and creating a safe community that projects people from harassment and discrimination.
October 26, 2010

Gender, Ethnic, and Latin American Studies Student Info Session

Come learn about the minor programs for Ethnic, Gender and Latin American Studies.
Gender Studies Brown Bag on Tuesday, Oct. 19, 2010 on Indigenous Feminism.
October 19, 2010

Gender Studies Brown Bag

Join us for Assistant Professor of Sociology Sarah Warren’s talk: “Indigenous Feminism: The Possibilities and Binds of Tradition for Mapuche Women in Argentina.” 
Carmund White
April 13, 2010

Carmund White - Solo Lecture Recita

Tenor Carmund White will perform a solo lecture recital on the African-American spiritual. Mr. White’s haunting performance will intersperse remarks about the history and context of the spiritual with his stunning a cappella interpretations of many of these powerful songs.
February 1, 2010

Celebrate Black History Month

The Office of Multicultural Affairs, the Black Student Union, International Students oft Lewis & Clark, and English Department invite you to Lewis & Clark’s Black History Month programs.
January 19, 2010

Martin Luther King Jr. Speaker: Randall Kennedy

Join us in welcoming Randall Kennedy when he presents his lecture, “Is The Election of Barack Obama The Fulfillment of Dr. King’s Dream?”






Caption...
November 11, 2009

Sixth Annual Lewis & Clark College Ray Warren Multicultural Symposium

Mixed:  The Politics of Hybrid Identities
Caption...
October 20, 2009

Informational Meeting!

Ethnic Studies, Gender Studies & Latin American Studies Programs Informational Meeting
James Loewen
October 15, 2009

Memory Studies Lecture Series

The second of three lectures this fall, presented by James Loewen, bestselling author of Lies My Teacher Told Me and Sundown Towns.