What Do Our ENVS Students/Alums Do? Read Some Recent and Other Posts 

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  • Rachael Lipinski (’09), a graduate of the Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College, writes about her time working as an environmental attorney.
  • May 3, 2019 at 8:24pm

    This story map can also be found here.

  • May 4, 2019 at 4:27pm

    screen-shot-2019-04-30-at-12.35.30-pm-e1

    The next person we engaged with was Bob Goldman, a professor of Sociology and Lewis & Clark. Last semester, Treasure and I took his Political Economy of Food course. Because Bob is an expert who has devoted a lot of time to the topics we’ve been exploring in our engagement project, Treasure and I thought… Continue reading Project Update: Solidifying thoughts through conversation. 

  • May 3, 2019 at 4:47pm

    screen-shot-2019-05-04-at-5.22.32-pm.png

    Recently, Treasure and I took the first step in our project. Feeling a little overwhelmed by the task of engagement, we started with people who were most accessible to us: our friends. Before we engaged, we reviewed our scholarship and developed our thinking a little, which caused our nagging questions to change. Our broadest, overarching question… Continue reading Project Update: A Dialogue with a Friend 

  • Emma Redfoot (’13) describes her indirect path toward studying nuclear engineering after graduating Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Environmental Studies.
  • May 2, 2019 at 4:43pm

    Well, four years has come and gone and now I am about to enter into the *real world*, yikes. To be quite honest, I really never thought I’d make it out of college alive. I have spent the last four years not only expanding my scholarly interests and knowledge but also learning how to cope with mental illness. I can now proudly say that I have graduated from DBT (Dialectic Behavior Therapy) and will be receiving my B.A. in Environmental Studies, yay! After transferring to Lewis & Clark my sophomore year from University of San Francisco I became much more interested in the social and political side of Environmental Studies and hope to continue that after I move on from LC. I have thought about graduate school and maybe even law school (?) but for the time being I am focusing on getting a job that will financially support me. 

    After graduation I will continue to live in Portland and work at Whole Foods. During my spare time will be volunteering at the Native American Youth and Family (NAYA) center in Portland in their food pantry. I will be attending the 2019 Grand Ronde Education Summit this June where I will learn about Grand Ronde history, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Indigenous sovereignty, and much, much more! After the June summit, my hope is to find a job somewhat related to environmental justice in the Portland area and begin that in the fall/winter 0f 2019. 

    On the very impractical, idealistic side of things I would love to move to LA with my boyfriend Owen and find a place for us to live with my best friend Summer and her girlfriend Sam. (Summer just got a job in the ~entertainment~ industry and therefore has to live in LA, otherwise she and Sam would move up here after she graduates from LMU in two weeks).

    Anyways… on the more practical side of things… here is a (very) tentative outline of my five year plan:

    Year One (2019-2020)

    • Find a new place to live with my housemates!! (my current lease is up May 31st)
    • Continue working at Whole Foods until I find a new job 
    • Find a job relating to environmental/social justice in Portland
    • If I can’t find a job related to EJ/SJ maybe get a job as a budtender somewhere
    • Volunteer with NAYA
    • Keep rock climbing and get strong enough to climb V7

    Year Two (2020-2021)

    • Hopefully have found a job in EJ/SJ or as a budtender and keep working said job
    • Move into an apartment with Owen, bye bye housemates 
    • Keep volunteering with NAYA
    • Be good enough at rock climbing that I get sponsored by REI, La Sportiva, Mad Rock, or all of the above and stop working (just kidding)

    Year Three (2021-2022)

    • Keep working somewhere
    • Maybe start thinking about higher education (?) If I were to continue my education I am interested in Sociology and so this would be the year I start applying to places
    • Maybe think about moving somewhere other than Portland (back to Colorado? California? not really sure where but ideally somewhere west of the Rocky Mountains)
    • Keep on rock climbing 

    Year Four (2022-2023)

    • If I do choose to go to grad/law school, hopefully I will get accepted somewhere and this year 
    • If I don’t chose to continue my education, continue working somewhere

    Year Five (2023-2024)

    • If I’m in grad/law school at this point, continue with that 
    • Depending where I am geographically maybe think about buying a home? (wow, scary)
    • Keep working, only 40 more years until retirement  
    • Maybe adopt a feline friend for my cat buddy (but also maybe not he likes being the center of attention) 

    I’ve gotten this far without having it all figured out so I’m not super worried about where I’ll be in five years. Life seems to have a way of falling into place, despite the struggles we may face. 

  • Gabby Francolla
    Gabriella Francolla ’18 majored in ENVS. She describes her path after graduating from Lewis & Clark, where she has had the opportunity to engage with diverse populations while working as an educator.  Next year she will begin working as an Environmental Educator Volunteer with the Peace Corps in Mexico.
  • Editions of Street Roots available on campus
    Environmental Studies student Shoshana Rybeck ’20, works to make copies of Street Roots newspaper available on campus.
  • May 2, 2019 at 5:56pm

    Year 1: Explore

    This summer, I will continue working at the law school as the assistant to the director of marketing and communications. In this role, I write, edit, and help design the annual law school magazine, Advocate . I also maintain the law school website, write institutional articles, and design outreach materials for the different programs. I also plan to find volunteer opportunities in the Portland community — either working with kids or outside (or both!) Come September 3, I will fly to London and travel Europe for a few months. During this time, I will focus on writing and networking to expand on my thesis and venture to Ireland. My goal is to either work on a commercial fishing vessel in Ireland so that I can write from experience, or else I will conduct lengthy interviews with the relevant actors on the Irish fishing scene. When I return from Europe, I will get a job doing pretty much whatever, whenever. As my main skill is writing and editing for publications, I hope to do something journalism-related, but I’m open to most positions. This year is about trying new things and going different places, not about overplanning.

    Year 2: Figure it Out

    After basically chilling out for a year, I’ve got to figure out my next steps. I will have thought and written quite extensively about who I would like to become and how to get there by that point, and will pursue an entry level job doing that thing. Right now, I’m weighing the following fields, which will lead to the associated job preferences

    • Environmental Law & Policy: entry level research/writing position or an executive assistant position at an environmental policy think tank
    • Journalism: freelance for several publications and/or get an entry level reporting job at a local newspaper/magazine
    • Science Education: naturalist at a summer camp, science experiment leader at an afterschool program
    • Conservation: any position working for a national or state park or conservation-focused NGO

    Year 3: Next Moves

    Among the 4 options above, I will have done some of them and decided which I would like to pursue as my main career. Thus, I will either grow in that job (at the company I’m with at the time or apply elsewhere) or I will apply to grad schools/training programs in that field. I am confident that no matter what I end up pursuing, all of the options will draw upon my ENVS degree – and the fields themselves inform each other. In true ENVS spirit, I will use my ability to cross disciplines in order to scale up and out, giving me a competitive edge in the job market (I hope).  

    Year 4 & 5: Keep on Keepin’ on

    These are the years where I’ll be in grad school or a training program, simply doing the thing I picked.

  • May 10, 2019 at 10:34am

    My Survey Results

    “Thank you for recently completing our EcoTypes survey. Here is your personalized report, calculated from your responses. If you’d like more information to better understand this report or the EcoTypes initiative, go to the EcoTypes website (jimproctor.us/ecotypes).
     
    You responded to four statements from each of fourteen EcoTypes axes. Most of these axes are bundled into three main EcoTypes themes below. You’ll see your average scores, from -10 to +10, with negative values suggesting greater affinity to the left pole, and vice versa. What sorts of patterns in your environmental ideas emerge from these summary values?
     
    We also calculated an EcoTypes polarity score for you: higher polarity scores (roughly 3 or greater) mean that your axis responses were more toward the right or left poles; thus you expressed stronger views overall than others. Like your axis responses, this is neither good nor bad but provides opportunities for reflection and comparison. Here’s your polarity score: 4.0.
     
    Below your EcoTypes tables is a table summarizing your average response to grid-group cultural theory items. What do these summary values say about you? Do you believe you match the grid-group type assigned to you below? How may it relate to your EcoTypes axis and theme scores? For more information on grid-group theory, see the EcoTypes page.
     
    Make sure to save this email so that you can compare your score to those of other respondents in your class or on the EcoTypes website. You may also be asked to retake this survey at some point in future to see if your responses changed at all, so you’ll need to compare the two email reports. If any questions, feel free to email the EcoTypes initiative director, Prof. Jim Proctor of Lewis & Clark College (jproctor@lclark.edu). Thanks again for completing the survey!”
    Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.26.38 AM.png Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.26.56 AM.png Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.27.07 AM.png
  • Kori Groenveld
    ENVS alumna, Kori Groenveld ’18, describes how her path at LC lead her to a career in the energy industry.  She is working as a Program Administrator at the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center.
  • May 2, 2019 at 5:28pm

    IMG_1190

    Five years from now, my goal is to be living and working in Los Angeles as a freelance horn player. My dream gig is recording for movie scores, but I would also like to be taking ensemble auditions and plan on teaching private students to supplement my income. I also plan to be taking all kinds of other side gigs as an ensemble ringer, chamber musician, and music coach. In a perfect scenario, I would be living in a tiny house that could also function as a teaching studio while keeping living costs low while my partner and I focus on establishing our careers.

    My immediate post-graduation plans involve staying in Portland over most of the summer to organize my life in preparation for new endeavors. I am currently applying for season full-time work to help me cover living expense and save up for moving to California in the fall. I have been offered one already, but I’m waiting just a little bit to see if a better option works out. I will spend about three weeks at Bryn Mawr College at the Music House International festival, where I will study with Jeffrey Lang and Shelley Showers of the Philadelphia Orchestra while participating in orchestra, chamber music, a concerto competition, and mock auditions with other collegiate musicians.

    The next steps toward reaching this goal include earning a Master of Music degree in horn performance. I have been accepted to the California State University at Long Beach’s Bob Cole Conservatory of Music, which I will be attending this fall to start my two-year degree program. I will move from Portland to Long Beach in mid-August. I plan to study with both Jenny Kim and Dylan Hart, and my coursework will focus primarily on performance rather than research. I have been in contact with faculty members of the conservatory and have been informally offered a graduate assistantship with the graduate program advisor, which will allow me to work in administration. I also hope to start taking gigs and auditions at the local level and seeking out potential students to start my own teaching studio.

    After graduating from Long Beach, my next three years will depend heavily on how well I can develop my musical skills and market myself as a performer. Auditions for ensemble positions are typically blind at least for the early rounds and may even remain blind until the final decision for some positions, but gigs have a lot to do with being a performer who is both good at their craft and enjoyable to work with. I plan on boosting my reach and networking potential by using the skills I have developed in the Lewis & Clark College environmental studies department with WordPress to make a new website that will help me market myself as a performer. If my income as a freelancer becomes reliable enough, I look forward to using many of the paid widgets that really streamlined my previous site and made it very user-friendly. In the meantime, I feel confident that I’ve developed a comfortable skill level with free options that I should still be able to successfully manage a useful website.

  • Laura Schroeder (’14) describes her year as a Fulbright scholar in Colombia after having taken courses in environmental studies and graduating from Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Sociology/Anthropology.
  • Osamu Kumasaka
    ENVS alumnus Osamu Kumasaka ’16, describes his path to working in environmental conflict resolution.  He is a Junior Associate at the Consensus Building Institute in Boston, MA.
  • May 4, 2019 at 12:46pm

    books-1204029_960_720.jpg

    Allen, N., 2015. Understanding the importance of urban amenities: A case study from Auckland.Buildings, 5(1), pp.85-99.

    Bedolla, L.G., 2005. Fluid borders: Latino power, identity, and politics in Los Angeles. Univ of California Press.

    Bureau of Planning and Sustainability., 1980. Comprehensive Plan Goals and Policies.

    Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, City of Portland Bureau Transportation. “Cully Commercial Corridor and Local Street Plan.” September 12, 2012.

    Campbell, S., 1996. Green cities, growing cities, just cities?: Urban planning and the contradictions of sustainable development. Journal of the American Planning Association, 62(3),pp.296-312.

    Carter, Majora. 2019 Sustainable South Bronx. https://www.ssbx.org/.

    Carter, Majora., 2006. “Green Is the New Black.” Race, Poverty & the Environment, vol. 13, no. 1 pp. 48–50. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/41495688

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2019. “What is a neighborhood Greenway”https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/348902

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2018. Upcoming Capital Projects in the Cully neighborhood.https://pdx.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=5d724197181c49809c4abb5933f

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2018. Local Improvement Districts (LIDs).https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/35715

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2019. Our Mission Statement.https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/32360

    City of Portland Bureau of Planning., 2008. Cully-Concordia Community Assessment: A summary of Physical, Social and Economic Conditions in Cully and Concordia.

    City of Portland, Oregon., 2018. 2035 Comprehensive Plan.https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/70936

    City of Portland, Oregon., 2012. The Portland Plan.http://www.portlandonline.com/portlandplan/index.cfm?c=56527

    Community Cycling Center.,2019. About: A Non-profit on a Mission.

    Crane, R. and Weber, R. eds., 2015. The Oxford handbook of urban planning. Oxford University Press.

    Day, K., 2006. Active living and social justice: planning for physical activity in low-income, black, and Latino communities. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(1), pp.88-99.

    Enelow, N. and Hesselgrave, T., 2015. Verde and Living Cully: A Venture in Placemaking.

    Fainstein, S.S. and DeFilippis, J. eds., 2015. Readings in planning theory. John Wiley & Sons.

    Muller, Edward K. “The Origins of Practical Planning.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 58, no. 1 (1991): 62-70. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27773423.

    Fitzgerald, J. and Vitello, S.P., 2014. Impacts of the community reinvestment act on neighborhood change and gentrification. Housing Policy Debate, 24(2), pp.446-466.

    Gibson, K.J., 2007. Bleeding Albina: A history of community disinvestment, 1940‐ 2000. Transforming Anthropology, 15(1), pp.3-25.

    Goodling, E., Green, J. and McClintock, N., 2015. Uneven development of the sustainable city: Shifting capital in Portland, Oregon. Urban Geography, 36(4), pp.504-527.

    Grant, J., 2001. The dark side of the grid: power and urban design. Planning Perspectives, 16(3),pp.219-241.

    Grant, T.L., Edwards, N., Sveistrup, H., Andrew, C. and Egan, M., 2010. Inequitable walking conditions among older people: examining the interrelationship of neighborhood socioeconomic status and urban form using a comparative case study. BMC public health, 10(1),p.677.

    Greenberg, M., 2013. What on Earth Is Sustainable?: Toward Critical Sustainability Studies. Boom: A Journal of California, 3(4), pp.54-66

    Hollister, R.M. and Clay, P.L, 1983. Neighborhood Policy and Planning Lexington. MA:Lexington Books.

    Krueckeberg, D.A., 2018. Introduction to planning history in the United States. Routledge.

    Lane, Dee. 1990. Major Lenders Aid Decline of NE Portland. The Oregonian. Retrieved fromhttps://www.oregonlive.com/portland/2014/08/major_lenders_discourage_homeo.html

    Lee, R.J., Sener, I.N. & Jones, S.N., 2017. Understanding the role of equity in active transportation planning in the United States. Transport reviews., 37(2), pp.211–226.

    Living Cully, 2018. About the Cully Neighborhood. http://www.livingcully.org/about-livingcully/cully-neighborhood/

    Living Cully et al., 2013. Not in Cully: Anti-Displacement Strategies for the Cully Neighborhood. http://www.livingcully.org/incoming/2015/10/Not-in-Cully-Full-Report.pdf.

    Living Cully et al., 2019. Transporatation Advocacy. http://www.livingcully.org/programs/transportation-and-neighborhood-accessibility/

    Manzo, L.C. and Perkins, D.D., 2006. Finding common ground: The importance of place attachment to community participation and planning. Journal of planning literature, 20(4),pp.335-350.

    Martin, D.G., 2003. “Place-framing” as place-making: Constituting a neighborhood for organizing and activism. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 93(3), pp.730-750.

    McLain, Rebecca and Donohue, Kevin et al., 2017. Living Cully Walks and Active Transportation in Cully.http://pdxedu.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapJournal/index.html?appid=91f50d39faff41a6895b48700c1db1f0#

    Minow Smith, Darby, 2012. Breaking: Portland sustainability admits ‘Portlandia’ isn’t really a parady.Grist. https://grist.org/cities/breaking-portland-sustainability-chief-admits-portlandia-isntreally-a-parody/

    Morris, A., 1971.History of Urban Form—5:Origins of Garden City. Official Architecture and Planning, 34(10), 779-781. Retrieved from http://www.jstor.org/stable/43964010

    Pardo, Mary, 1990. Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies.Vol. 11, No. 1, Las Chicanas pp. 1-7. Print.

    Perkins, D.D., Crim, B., Silberman, P. and Brown, B.B., 2004. Community development as a response to community-level adversity: Ecological theory and research and strengths-based policy.

    KI Maton, CJ Schellenbach, BJ Leadbeater, BJ and AL Solarz, AL (Eds.). Investing in Children, Youth, Families, and Communities: Strengths-Based Research and Policy.Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

    Ramasubramanian, L. and Gonzalez, A., 2007. Placeworx: A model to foster youth engagement and empowerment. Children Youth and Environments, 17(2), pp.461-471.

    Rubin, H.J., 2000. Renewing hope within neighborhoods of despair: The community-based development model. SUNY Press.

    Schragger, R.C., 2016. City power: Urban governance in a global age. Oxford University Press.

    Smith, N., 1982. Gentrification and uneven development. Economic geography, 58(2), pp.139-155.

    Sparling, Zane., 2018. 141 Affordable Unites Slated for Sugar Shack site in Cully. Portland Tribune. https://pamplinmedia.com/pt/9-news/414330-315888-141-affordable-units-slated-forsugar-shack-site-in-cully

    Stanley K. Schultz. 1989. Constructing Urban Culture: American Cities and City Plan- ning, 1800-1920. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

    Teaford, J.,1991. The Visionary and the Realtor. Reviews in American History, 19(2), 243-248.doi:10.2307/2703078

    Verde, Living Cully. 2013. Cully Park Community Health Indicator Project.

    Verde. 2014. “Portland Parks & Recreation Invests $1.25 million in Cully Park.” Portland, OR:Verde.

    Waldroupe, Amanda., 2015. Sugar Shack deal a Sweet Opportunity Portland’s Cully neighborhood. https://news.streetroots.org/2015/10/01/sugar-shack-deal-sweet-opportunityportland-s-cully-neighborhood

    Walton, J. and Carns, D.E., 1977. Cities in change: Studies on the urban condition. Boston:Allyn and Bacon.

    Walker, G., 2009. Beyond distribution and proximity: exploring the multiple spatialities of environmental justice. Antipode, 41(4), pp.614-636.

    While, A., Jonas, A.E. and Gibbs, D., 2004. The environment and the entrepreneurial city: searching for the urban ‘sustainability fix’in Manchester and Leeds. International Journal of urban and Regional Research, 28(3), pp.549-569.

    Wilson, B.B., 2018. Resilience for all: Striving for equity through community-driven design. Island Press.

  • May 2, 2019 at 9:00pm

    close-up-compass-direction-841286.jpg

    Year 1: Explore

    This summer, I will continue working at the law school as the assistant to the director of marketing and communications. In this role, I write, edit, and help design the annual law school magazine, Advocate . I also maintain the law school website, write institutional articles, and design outreach materials for the different programs. I also plan to find volunteer opportunities in the Portland community — either working with kids or outside (or both!) Come September 3, I will fly to London and travel Europe for a few months. During this time, I will focus on writing and networking to expand on my thesis and venture to Ireland. My goal is to either work on a commercial fishing vessel in Ireland so that I can write from experience, or else I will conduct lengthy interviews with the relevant actors on the Irish fishing scene. When I return from Europe, I will get a job doing pretty much whatever, whenever. As my main skill is writing and editing for publications, I hope to do something journalism-related, but I’m open to most positions. This year is about trying new things and going different places, not about overplanning.

    Year 2: Figure it Out

    After basically chilling out for a year, I’ve got to figure out my next steps. I will have thought and written quite extensively about who I would like to become and how to get there by that point, and will pursue an entry level job doing that thing. Right now, I’m weighing the following fields, which will lead to the associated job preferences

    • Environmental Law & Policy: entry level research/writing position or an executive assistant position at an environmental policy think tank
    • Journalism: freelance for several publications and/or get an entry level reporting job at a local newspaper/magazine
    • Science Education: naturalist at a summer camp, science experiment leader at an afterschool program
    • Conservation: any position working for a national or state park or conservation-focused NGO

    Year 3: Next Moves

    Among the 4 options above, I will have done some of them and decided which I would like to pursue as my main career. Thus, I will either grow in that job (at the company I’m with at the time or apply elsewhere) or I will apply to grad schools/training programs in that field. I am confident that no matter what I end up pursuing, all of the options will draw upon my ENVS degree – and the fields themselves inform each other. In true ENVS spirit, I will use my ability to cross disciplines in order to scale up and out, giving me a competitive edge in the job market (I hope).  

    Year 4 & 5: Keep on Keepin’ on

    These are the years where I’ll be in grad school or a training program, simply doing the thing I picked.

  • May 4, 2019 at 1:31pm

    screen-shot-2019-05-04-at-5.36.29-pm.png

    Beginning to feel pressed for time and curious about consumer opinions on purchasing power and making change, Treasure and I created an online survey. The survey asked participants to rank and assess various grocery stores and explain their reasoning, to articulate the factors (such as cost, selection, accessibility, perceived environmental impacts, nutritional value, etc.) that… Continue reading Project Update: Consumer Survey 

  • Eva Johnson (’15) describes her trajectory after graduating Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Environmental Studies.
  • May 4, 2019 at 2:31pm

    screen-shot-2019-05-04-at-5.26.28-pm.png

    Hoping to continue to explore our nagging question, why do people buy what they buy? Treasure and I set up a meeting with Lewis & Clark Philosophy professor, Jay Odenbaugh. In Jay’s Philosophy and the Environment class, students grapple with the meanings, pros, and cons of individual and collective action. We hoped our meeting would get us… Continue reading Project Update: More talking, more listening. 

  • Darya Watnick (’13), a graduate of the Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College, describes her time spent working in Israel for three years after graduating and returning to work as a Jewish Engagement Manager in the U.S.
  • Michaela Koke (’16) describes her work with the Merck Family Fund and her first year after graduating Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Environmental Studies and Sociology/Anthropology.
  • May 2, 2019 at 10:04pm

    IMG_1190

    Five years from now, my goal is to be living and working in Los Angeles as a freelance horn player. My dream gig is recording for movie scores, but I would also like to be taking ensemble auditions and plan on teaching private students to supplement my income. I also plan to be taking all kinds of other side gigs as an ensemble ringer, chamber musician, and music coach. In a perfect scenario, I would be living in a tiny house that could also function as a teaching studio while keeping living costs low while my partner and I focus on establishing our careers.

    My immediate post-graduation plans involve staying in Portland over most of the summer to organize my life in preparation for new endeavors. I am currently applying for season full-time work to help me cover living expense and save up for moving to California in the fall. I have been offered one already, but I’m waiting just a little bit to see if a better option works out. I will spend about three weeks at Bryn Mawr College at the Music House International festival, where I will study with Jeffrey Lang and Shelley Showers of the Philadelphia Orchestra while participating in orchestra, chamber music, a concerto competition, and mock auditions with other collegiate musicians.

    The next steps toward reaching this goal include earning a Master of Music degree in horn performance. I have been accepted to the California State University at Long Beach’s Bob Cole Conservatory of Music, which I will be attending this fall to start my two-year degree program. I will move from Portland to Long Beach in mid-August. I plan to study with both Jenny Kim and Dylan Hart, and my coursework will focus primarily on performance rather than research. I have been in contact with faculty members of the conservatory and have been informally offered a graduate assistantship with the graduate program advisor, which will allow me to work in administration. I also hope to start taking gigs and auditions at the local level and seeking out potential students to start my own teaching studio.

    After graduating from Long Beach, my next three years will depend heavily on how well I can develop my musical skills and market myself as a performer. Auditions for ensemble positions are typically blind at least for the early rounds and may even remain blind until the final decision for some positions, but gigs have a lot to do with being a performer who is both good at their craft and enjoyable to work with. I plan on boosting my reach and networking potential by using the skills I have developed in the Lewis & Clark College environmental studies department with WordPress to make a new website that will help me market myself as a performer. If my income as a freelancer becomes reliable enough, I look forward to using many of the paid widgets that really streamlined my previous site and made it very user-friendly. In the meantime, I feel confident that I’ve developed a comfortable skill level with free options that I should still be able to successfully manage a useful website.

  • Charlotte Copp
    ENVS alumna, Charlotte Copp ’18, explores the field of GIS.  She is currently a GIS intern for the City of Lake Oswego.
  • May 4, 2019 at 9:47am

    Allen, N., 2015. Understanding the importance of urban amenities: A case study from Auckland.Buildings, 5(1), pp.85-99.

    Bedolla, L.G., 2005. Fluid borders: Latino power, identity, and politics in Los Angeles. Univ of California Press.

    Bureau of Planning and Sustainability., 1980. Comprehensive Plan Goals and Policies.

    Bureau of Planning and Sustainability, City of Portland Bureau Transportation. “Cully Commercial Corridor and Local Street Plan.” September 12, 2012.

    Campbell, S., 1996. Green cities, growing cities, just cities?: Urban planning and the contradictions of sustainable development. Journal of the American Planning Association, 62(3),pp.296-312.

    Carter, Majora. 2019 Sustainable South Bronx. https://www.ssbx.org/.

    Carter, Majora., 2006. “Green Is the New Black.” Race, Poverty & the Environment, vol. 13, no. 1 pp. 48–50. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/41495688

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2019. “What is a neighborhood Greenway”https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/article/348902

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2018. Upcoming Capital Projects in the Cully neighborhood.https://pdx.maps.arcgis.com/apps/MapSeries/index.html?appid=5d724197181c49809c4abb5933f

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2018. Local Improvement Districts (LIDs).https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/35715

    City of Portland Bureau of Transportation., 2019. Our Mission Statement.https://www.portlandoregon.gov/transportation/32360

    City of Portland Bureau of Planning., 2008. Cully-Concordia Community Assessment: A summary of Physical, Social and Economic Conditions in Cully and Concordia.

    City of Portland, Oregon., 2018. 2035 Comprehensive Plan.https://www.portlandoregon.gov/bps/70936

    City of Portland, Oregon., 2012. The Portland Plan.http://www.portlandonline.com/portlandplan/index.cfm?c=56527

    Community Cycling Center.,2019. About: A Non-profit on a Mission.

    Crane, R. and Weber, R. eds., 2015. The Oxford handbook of urban planning. Oxford University Press.

    Day, K., 2006. Active living and social justice: planning for physical activity in low-income, black, and Latino communities. Journal of the American Planning Association, 72(1), pp.88-99.

    Enelow, N. and Hesselgrave, T., 2015. Verde and Living Cully: A Venture in Placemaking.

    Fainstein, S.S. and DeFilippis, J. eds., 2015. Readings in planning theory. John Wiley & Sons.

    Muller, Edward K. “The Origins of Practical Planning.” Pennsylvania History: A Journal of Mid-Atlantic Studies 58, no. 1 (1991): 62-70. http://www.jstor.org/stable/27773423.

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    Grant, T.L., Edwards, N., Sveistrup, H., Andrew, C. and Egan, M., 2010. Inequitable walking conditions among older people: examining the interrelationship of neighborhood socioeconomic status and urban form using a comparative case study. BMC public health, 10(1),p.677.

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  • Julia Benford '17
    Julia Benford (’17), a graduate of the  Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College, reflects on how critical thinking and inquiry skills she gained through ENVS course studies are especially useful when teaching environmental education at Tualatin Hills Nature Center.
  • May 10, 2019 at 7:34am

    My Survey Results

    “Thank you for recently completing our EcoTypes survey. Here is your personalized report, calculated from your responses. If you’d like more information to better understand this report or the EcoTypes initiative, go to the EcoTypes website (jimproctor.us/ecotypes).
     
    You responded to four statements from each of fourteen EcoTypes axes. Most of these axes are bundled into three main EcoTypes themes below. You’ll see your average scores, from -10 to +10, with negative values suggesting greater affinity to the left pole, and vice versa. What sorts of patterns in your environmental ideas emerge from these summary values?
     
    We also calculated an EcoTypes polarity score for you: higher polarity scores (roughly 3 or greater) mean that your axis responses were more toward the right or left poles; thus you expressed stronger views overall than others. Like your axis responses, this is neither good nor bad but provides opportunities for reflection and comparison. Here’s your polarity score: 4.0.
     
    Below your EcoTypes tables is a table summarizing your average response to grid-group cultural theory items. What do these summary values say about you? Do you believe you match the grid-group type assigned to you below? How may it relate to your EcoTypes axis and theme scores? For more information on grid-group theory, see the EcoTypes page.
     
    Make sure to save this email so that you can compare your score to those of other respondents in your class or on the EcoTypes website. You may also be asked to retake this survey at some point in future to see if your responses changed at all, so you’ll need to compare the two email reports. If any questions, feel free to email the EcoTypes initiative director, Prof. Jim Proctor of Lewis & Clark College (jproctor@lclark.edu). Thanks again for completing the survey!”
    Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.26.38 AM.png Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.26.56 AM.png Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 7.27.07 AM.png
  • Hanah Goldov (’13), ENVS major at Lewis & Clark College, describes how her interest in  intentional spaces and environmental design began in her undergraduate work and will continue as she enters a Master’s Program in Landscape Architecture at the University of California, Berkeley fall of 2018.
  • Erin Scheibe (’15) writes about her experiences pursuing a career in nursing after graduating from the Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College.
  • May 2, 2019 at 11:20pm

    lewis__clark_law_school_amphitheater.jpg

    As we wrap up the final semester of our undergraduate career, it is time to turn our thoughts to the future. I have been fortunate to know that I have wanted to attend law school as early as middle school. I have set myself on a path to achieve this aspiration and I will be attending Lewis & Clark Law School this fall. This institution has been my dream school for many years and I am unbelievably excited to have the opportunity to study environmental law with the #1 program in the nation.

    While the thought of three additional years of school is a little daunting, it is helpful to know exactly where I will be post-graduation. In addition to wanting to study environmental law at Lewis & Clark, I was not yet ready to leave Portland. I have housing figured out for the next several years and I can easily picture this city as my future home. For the time being, I will focus on my first year at the law school as a 1L student. I will actually not be taking any environmental law classes right away since Lewis & Clark requires 1L students to complete courses in the more basic areas of law before specializing. The first year will be my introduction to the legal realm, which is perfectly fine since I am sure I will be overwhelmed with managing the intensity of law school. Luckily, I do feel that the rigorous academics of our ENVS major have prepared me well. In particular, I feel confident in my research and writing abilities after completing a thesis paper.

    My second year at Lewis & Clark is when I can begin taking environmental law courses. I am excited by this prospect and I have already reviewed the course catalog for potential classes. The law school offers courses on topics such as water law, climate change policy, energy law, environmental litigation, Native American natural resource law, and much more. I am most looking forward to the opportunity to work with the Earthrise Law Center. Earthrise is the domestic environmental law clinic at Lewis & Clark Law School. They offer legal services to public interest organizations and are able to train law students with direct involvement in cases. As a 2L student, I can take a course that entails participation with the legal activities of Earthrise. There is also the possibility of summer internships which I would love to pursue in the summer after my second year. Karen Russell, who taught my ENVS 460 Intro to Environment Law and Policy course, is on staff at Earthrise so I already have a connection there.

    In my third and final year at the law school, I will finish up my Juris Doctorate degree as well as my certification in Environmental and Natural Resources Law. Specialization is not required in law school, but it is definitely the area of law that I will pursue. I hope that at this point I have worked with either Earthrise or another non-profit environmental protection organization. I am interested in litigation, so I want to gain as much experience as possible with practical applications of law. I know that I do not want to end up in a large law firm, so I will focus my networking efforts with smaller, public interest organizations. I have always carried a passion with me to do what I can to help protect the environment and I hope to convey my enthusiasm to future employers.

    Before jumping the gun with employment, there is one significant hurdle I have to overcome before actually practicing law: the state bar exam. I can choose to study and take the bar in whatever state I like, but part of the reason I chose to attend Lewis & Clark is because I knew I would want to stay in Oregon. I have repeatedly heard positive things about practicing law in this state, such as the collaboration amongst attorneys and the collegial atmosphere. After graduation in May of 2022, I will study to pass the bar in Oregon and begin my legal career. Ideally, the connections I have fostered at the law school will lead me to possible job prospects. I would be more than happy to be working with a small organization the first two years after law school. I will have significant student loans, so money will also be a consideration. Regardless, I am looking forward to the wide open possibilities not only after law school but while I am earning my degree as well.

  • Jules Bailey and colleagues at OBRC
    ENVS Alumnus, Jules Bailey ’01, keeps Oregon’s bottle deposit and return program successful and relevant.  He is the Chief Stewardship Officer for the Oregon Beverage Recycling Cooperative.
  • Kyle Tibbett (’15) talks about his life after graduating Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Environmental Studies and taking a position in fisheries management in Idaho.
  • May 2, 2019 at 8:17pm

    As we wrap up the final semester of our undergraduate career, it is time to turn our thoughts to the future. I have been fortunate to know that I have wanted to attend law school as early as middle school. I have set myself on a path to achieve this aspiration and I will be attending Lewis & Clark Law School this fall. This institution has been my dream school for many years and I am unbelievably excited to have the opportunity to study environmental law with the #1 program in the nation.

    While the thought of three additional years of school is a little daunting, it is helpful to know exactly where I will be post-graduation. In addition to wanting to study environmental law at Lewis & Clark, I was not yet ready to leave Portland. I have housing figured out for the next several years and I can easily picture this city as my future home. For the time being, I will focus on my first year at the law school as a 1L student. I will actually not be taking any environmental law classes right away since Lewis & Clark requires 1L students to complete courses in the more basic areas of law before specializing. The first year will be my introduction to the legal realm, which is perfectly fine since I am sure I will be overwhelmed with managing the intensity of law school. Luckily, I do feel that the rigorous academics of our ENVS major have prepared me well. In particular, I feel confident in my research and writing abilities after completing a thesis paper.

    My second year at Lewis & Clark is when I can begin taking environmental law courses. I am excited by this prospect and I have already reviewed the course catalog for potential classes. The law school offers courses on topics such as water law, climate change policy, energy law, environmental litigation, Native American natural resource law, and much more. I am most looking forward to the opportunity to work with the Earthrise Law Center. Earthrise is the domestic environmental law clinic at Lewis & Clark Law School. They offer legal services to public interest organizations and are able to train law students with direct involvement in cases. As a 2L student, I can take a course that entails participation with the legal activities of Earthrise. There is also the possibility of summer internships which I would love to pursue in the summer after my second year. Karen Russell, who taught my ENVS 460 Intro to Environment Law and Policy course, is on staff at Earthrise so I already have a connection there.

    In my third and final year at the law school, I will finish up my Juris Doctorate degree as well as my certification in Environmental and Natural Resources Law. Specialization is not required in law school, but it is definitely the area of law that I will pursue. I hope that at this point I have worked with either Earthrise or another non-profit environmental protection organization. I am interested in litigation, so I want to gain as much experience as possible with practical applications of law. I know that I do not want to end up in a large law firm, so I will focus my networking efforts with smaller, public interest organizations. I have always carried a passion with me to do what I can to help protect the environment and I hope to convey my enthusiasm to future employers.

    Before jumping the gun with employment, there is one significant hurdle I have to overcome before actually practicing law: the state bar exam. I can choose to study and take the bar in whatever state I like, but part of the reason I chose to attend Lewis & Clark is because I knew I would want to stay in Oregon. I have repeatedly heard positive things about practicing law in this state, such as the collaboration amongst attorneys and the collegial atmosphere. After graduation in May of 2022, I will study to pass the bar in Oregon and begin my legal career. Ideally, the connections I have fostered at the law school will lead me to possible job prospects. I would be more than happy to be working with a small organization the first two years after law school. I will have significant student loans, so money will also be a consideration. Regardless, I am looking forward to the wide open possibilities not only after law school but while I am earning my degree as well.

  • The project team's faculty and student members.
    It’s a persistent question: How do you prepare large populations for an emergency? Funded by a grant of more than half a million dollars from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team of Lewis & Clark faculty and students is creating a video game to educate and enlist young people in that critical process.
  • Environmental Studies and Economics major Aaron Fellows ’16 talks about his summer internship with the International Economic Development Council.
  • Eva Ramey (’15), a Biology major and Environmental Studies minor at Lewis & Clark College, describes how her international research unfolded, beginning with her study abroad experience in Tanzania.
  • May 3, 2019 at 9:18pm

    The image gallery below are captures from a story map project as part of the Constructing the American Landscape history class. Check out the full story map here.

  • Julia Huggins BA '13 at the Lynn Canal, Alaska.
    Julia Huggins BA ’13 has been awarded the Vanier Scholarship to continue her PhD in biogeochemistry at the University of British Columbia, where she is the chief scientist of the oceanography research program. The scholarship will fund her research on oxygen loss in the oceans and the environmental impact of marine microorganisms.
  • May 4, 2019 at 6:26pm

    screen-shot-2019-05-04-at-5.47.45-pm.png

    Please click here to check out my portfolio and learn about my engagement project, the culmination of my work in ENVS 295!

  • May 4, 2019 at 5:27pm

    screen-shot-2019-05-04-at-5.12.06-pm.png

    To wrap up the engagement piece of our project, Treasure and I gave Robin Teater a call. Robin is the Executive Director at Healthy Democracy, and has worked with LC’s Environmental Studies Program in the past to help us develop skills in communicating across difference through the dialogic model of communication. Robin is also an expert… Continue reading Project Update: A final phone call. 

  • Megan Coggeshall (’12) tells the story of how she ended up as a data analyst in global health research after graduating Lewis & Clark College with a degree in Environmental Studies and French Studies.
  • Aly Robinson (’11) writes about her work in environmental education and public health after graduating from Lewis & Clark College’s Environmental Studies Program.
  • Keith Morency (’16) highlights the various jobs that led him to work for a community solar team in Boston, MA, after graduating from the Environmental Studies program at Lewis & Clark College.
  • Rebecca Kidder (’16), a graduate of the Environmental Studies Program at Lewis & Clark College, describes her time working as a reading tutor in a kindergarten classroom in Minneapolis.
  • May 2, 2019 at 4:52pm

    Well, four years has come and gone and now I am about to enter into the *real world*, yikes. To be quite honest, I really never thought I’d make it out of college alive. I have spent the last four years not only expanding my scholarly interests and knowledge but also learning how to cope with mental illness. I can now proudly say that I have graduated from DBT (Dialectic Behavior Therapy) and will be receiving my B.A. in Environmental Studies, yay! After transferring to Lewis & Clark my sophomore year from University of San Francisco I became much more interested in the social and political side of Environmental Studies and hope to continue that after I move on from LC. I have thought about graduate school and maybe even law school (?) but for the time being I am focusing on getting a job that will financially support me. 

    After graduation I will continue to live in Portland and work at Whole Foods. During my spare time will be volunteering at the Native American Youth and Family (NAYA) center in Portland in their food pantry. I will be attending the 2019 Grand Ronde Education Summit this June where I will learn about Grand Ronde history, Traditional Ecological Knowledge, Indigenous sovereignty, and much, much more! After the June summit, my hope is to find a job somewhat related to environmental justice in the Portland area and begin that in the fall/winter 0f 2019. 

    On the very impractical, idealistic side of things I would love to move to LA with my boyfriend Owen and find a place for us to live with my best friend Summer and her girlfriend Sam. (Summer just got a job in the ~entertainment~ industry and therefore has to live in LA, otherwise she and Sam would move up here after she graduates from LMU in two weeks).

    Anyways… on the more practical side of things… here is a (very) tentative outline of my five year plan:

    Year One (2019-2020)

    • Find a new place to live with my housemates!! (my current lease is up May 31st)
    • Continue working at Whole Foods until I find a new job 
    • Find a job relating to environmental/social justice in Portland
    • If I can’t find a job related to EJ/SJ maybe get a job as a budtender somewhere
    • Volunteer with NAYA
    • Keep rock climbing and get strong enough to climb V7

    Year Two (2020-2021)

    • Hopefully have found a job in EJ/SJ or as a budtender and keep working said job
    • Move into an apartment with Owen, bye bye housemates 
    • Keep volunteering with NAYA
    • Be good enough at rock climbing that I get sponsored by REI, La Sportiva, Mad Rock, or all of the above and stop working (just kidding)

    Year Three (2021-2022)

    • Keep working somewhere
    • Maybe start thinking about higher education (?) If I were to continue my education I am interested in Sociology and so this would be the year I start applying to places
    • Maybe think about moving somewhere other than Portland (back to Colorado? California? not really sure where but ideally somewhere west of the Rocky Mountains)
    • Keep on rock climbing 

    Year Four (2022-2023)

    • If I do choose to go to grad/law school, hopefully I will get accepted somewhere and this year 
    • If I don’t chose to continue my education, continue working somewhere

    Year Five (2023-2024)

    • If I’m in grad/law school at this point, continue with that 
    • Depending where I am geographically maybe think about buying a home? (wow, scary)
    • Keep working, only 40 more years until retirement  
    • Maybe adopt a feline friend for my cat buddy (but also maybe not he likes being the center of attention) 

    I’ve gotten this far without having it all figured out so I’m not super worried about where I’ll be in five years. Life seems to have a way of falling into place, despite the struggles we may face.