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September 3rd, 2019

  •   7:30pm - 9:00pm: Orchestra Meet & Greet
    The Music Department invites you to participate in our orchestral program – open to ALL students regardless of your major!

October 27th, 2019

  • 7:30pm: Lewis & Clark Orchestra Concert
    The Lewis & Clark Orchestra presents its first concert of the fall semester on Sunday, October 27, 2019 at 7:30pm in the Agnes Flanagan Chapel. Lance Inouye, conductor.

News

  • February 4
    LC SALDF is lucky to have the support of the Center for Animal Law Studies (CALS), a center made up of fantastic individuals, many of whom are LC SALDF alumni and faculty advisors.  Learn more about the many accomplishments of CALS (just in the past week)!
  • September 7
    Video recordings of E&D events
  • Karla and Sahana at Meetup Night.
    July 23
    Our Community Friends Program matches international students with local resident volunteers to help them feel welcome and at home during their time at Lewis & Clark College.
  • Elliott Young
    January 30
    It is our pleasure to announce that Professor of History Elliott Young has been awarded a $6,000 American Philosophical Society (APS) Franklin Research Grant.
  • March 21
    Associate Professor of Art, Dawn Odell is a recipient of a Franklin Research Grant. 
  • Ashley Black, Visiting Assistant Professor of History
    November 1
  • Dr. Rasha Soliman
    October 31
  • Reiko Hillyer
    October 3
    The petition on change.org, co-sponsored by Professors Elliott Young and Reiko Hillyer, is in response to the The Oregonian/OregonLive’s analysis that one in two arrests made by the Portland Police Bureau last year was of a homeless person, while less than 3 percent of Portlanders are homeless.
  • Professor Reiko Hillyer
    October 4
    Professor Hillyer wins the Fletcher M. Green and Charles W. Ramsdell Award
  • July 11
    Associate Professor of Art and Studio Head of Sculpture Jess Perlitz was selected as one of just five Hallie Ford Fellows in the Visual Arts this year. The Ford Family Foundation awards $25,000 to Oregon artists at pivotal point in their careers through this fund.
  • The project team's faculty and student members.
    July 11
    It’s a persistent question: How do you prepare large populations for an emergency? Funded by a grant of more than half a million dollars from the National Science Foundation, an interdisciplinary team of Lewis & Clark faculty and students is creating a video game to educate and enlist young people in that critical process.
  • July 10
    Schedule of Faculty Meetings for 2019-2020
  • July 10
    The National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) seeks to stimulate new research through their highly competitive Summer Stipend program, which receives more than 800 applications a year. This year, NEH awarded 82 grants—and 2 of the 4 Oregon recipients are Lewis & Clark professors for their scholarly examinations of Buddhism and Socrates respectively.
  • Chemistry Professor Anne Bentley, in the lab with undergrads.
    June 6

    How do you teach an introductory course to a field that is both vast in content and fundamental to understanding inorganic chemistry? Associate Professor of Chemistry Anne Bentley is helping lead an innovative study funded by the National Science Foundation that unites a group of 20 professors and researchers from across the country to develop a groundbreaking inorganic chemistry course.

  • Professor of History and Director of Ethnic Studies, Elliott Young
    October 4
    The 2016 Luciano Tomassini Latin American International Relations Book Award Committee awarded an honorable mention to Alien Nation:Chinese Migration in the Americas from the Coolie Era through World War II (University of North Carolina Press, 2014), by Professor of History and Director of Ethnic Studies, Elliott Young.
  • September 15
    Professor of History Elliott Young’s opinion piece, titled “We Can Do More for Syrian Refugees” appears in the September 15, 2015 edition of The Huffington Post.
  • May 28
    “In my own lab, I have witnessed a powerful impact on students when they look directly into the zebrafish brain for the first time. It opens a window of curiosity that can inspire undergraduate scientists, who will ultimately develop new approaches and become the next generation of cutting-edge researchers,” Weissman writes in Scientific American. Read the whole essay.
  • March 22
    Oscar-winning costume designer Ruth Carter spoke to a full house on March 20. She made history as the first African American woman to win the Academy Award for Best Costume Design for her work on Black Panther. She regaled the audience with stories from her career and how she approaches telling stories through costume design. 
  • March 18
    Associate Professor of Sociology Maryann Bylander’s article “A Conflict of Interest” was recently published in The Baffler, a cultural and political journal. Focusing on the flaws of development and microfinance in Cambodia, the article is one of many ways Bylander is bringing her research findings to audiences beyond the academic sphere.
  • Glick and colleagues after their first "run" on the BLT.
    February 11
    Lewis & Clark’s high-performance computing (HPC) system has been propelled by a collaborative initiative driven by professors, staff members, and students. Although many are unaware of this HPC system—named BLT for its worker nodes “bacon, lettuce, and tomato”—it is paving the way for current and future research opportunities.
  • Winterim 2019 cohort
    January 25
    From January 13 to 18, 30 Lewis & Clark students from all corners of the globe took a deep dive into entrepreneurship and leadership. The flagship program of the John E. and Susan S. Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership, Winterim is a weeklong experience bringing students, speakers, and mentors together to explore what it means to be an entrepreneur.
  • Assistant Professor of Biology Norma Velazquez-Ulloa in her lab.
    December 17

    Assistant Professor of Biology Norma Velazquez-Ulloa has been awarded a competitive New Investigator grant from the Medical Research Foundation, funded by OHSU. With the funding, she will continue her research: identifying genes that mediate the effects of developmental nicotine exposure.

  • Assistant Professor of History Reiko Hillyer.
    December 13
    Assistant Professor of History Reiko Hillyer has been awarded a grant from the Whiting Foundation to support the expansion of her interdisciplinary project, “Theatre From the Inside-Out: Illuminating Mass Incarceration.” Specifically, the grant will enrich Hillyer’s course Crime and Punishment in U.S. History, which she teaches at the Columbia River Correctional Institution in Portland.
  • December 3
    At first glance, chemistry and English have little in common. Yet two courses from these disciplines are now intertwined, thanks to a rare tome acquired in 2014 by Watzek Library’s Special Collections: an illuminated 15th-century book of hours.
  • November 17
    Becoming a finalist for the Rhodes and Marshall scholarship requires outstanding academic prowess and character. Katie Kowal BA ’17 interviewed for both scholarships following an endorsement from the college and much support from faculty who believed Kowal was a perfect candidate for these distinguished awards.
  • Lewis & Clark professor Kim Stafford is named Oregon's ninth poet laureate.
    November 16
    Associate Professor Kim Stafford, noted writer and teacher, is chosen as Oregon’s ninth poet laureate.
  • November 2
    As sustainability becomes increasingly relevant in all academic and professional arenas, a new course offered in conjunction with the Bates Center for Entrepreneurship and Leadership gives students of any major an introduction to the challenges of running a sustainable business and the laws and technicalities of sustainability in the business world.
  • October 26
    Health is an issue that impacts us all, yet many struggle to receive adequate health care. In hopes of better understanding these inequities, the 15th Annual Ray Warren Symposium on Race and Ethnic Studies—titled Bitter Pills: Race, Health, and Medicine—focuses on the racialized dimensions of health, highlighting the voices of communities of color. Running November 7 through November 9, the symposium is free and open to the public.
  • October 18
    Sweeney Todd , a collaboration between the music and theatre departments, opens on November 2. Director Rebecca Lingafelter has transformed the traditional setting of Fleet Street into a post-apocalyptic, subterranean world where the audience and student orchestra will sit among the actors. The musical will feature Liam Beveridge BA ’20 as Sweeney in his first-ever singing role.
  • October 17
    Current discourse is marked with a boundary-oriented mentality, and animosity on both sides prevents meaningful progress. Taking place October 23 through October 24, the 21st Environmental Affairs Symposium hopes to change that narrative. To facilitate this conversation, race relations expert Daryl Davis will speak on his experience engaging with members of the Ku Klux Klan and how he finds common ground with people of all backgrounds and opinions.

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