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  • February 1
    2002
    Massengale is the founder and chief executive officer of Spinoza Technology, a Seattle-based company that provides wireless handheld devices and communication software. Over the past three decades, Massengale has worked in marketing, human resources, and operations management in organizations at the forefront of technology, including Tektronix, Intel, and Microsoft.
  • February 1
    1990
  • February 1
    1987
  • February 1
    1987

Blurbs

  • Philip Berkowitz JD ’78, a shareholder in Littler’s New York office, has been recognized in the 2018 Who’s Who Legal Labour, Employment & Benefits Guide

  • Mark Pinder BS ’78 has retired from his position as principal of Milwaukie (Oregon) High School. He will be remembered for, among other things, overseeing the school as it achieved record-high graduation rates. Pinder began his career as a teacher at Jefferson High School in Portland in 1979.

  • Ann Lehman JD ’78 returned to Portland to live in the first senior cohousing in the southeast part of the city. Lehman is active on the board of the Cohousing Association of the United States and will be cochairing the National CoHousing Conference, to be held in Portland May 30 through June 2, 2019. She also teaches trauma-informed yoga to homeless and other young people.

  • Richard D. Acott JD ’78 passed away on February 18, 2018, at the age of 81.

    Richard was born in Fort Collins, Colorado, April 23, 1936. He earned a BA in political science from Chapman College before he was commissioned as a Marine Corps officer. He received his naval aviator wings in 1957. While stationed in Florida, Richard met the love of his life, Constance, and they were married within a month of their first date.

    During 1966–67, Richard flew 115 combat missions from Chu Lai, Vietnam, in the A4 Skyhawk. His awards and citations included the Distinguished Flying Cross.

    After his Marine Corps experience, Richard worked in the insurance business and was owner/broker of a real estate company. Following law school, he was in private law practice, worked as a deputy district attorney, and was appointed to the county court bench as a magistrate.

    Throughout his life, Richard had an enduring love of art. In 1988 he began studying sculpture at the Loveland Colorado Art Academy. In 1995 he opened a studio in Loveland, changing his career one last time.

    Richard was preceded in death by his son Stephen and grandson Jesse. He is survived by his wife, Constance; his daughter, Lorri; sons Garret and Phillip; eight grandchildren; and five great-grandchildren

  • Scot Sellers BA ’78 was appointed lead independent director of Milhaus, a development and property management company based in Indianapolis. Previously, Sellers was chair and CEO of Archstone.

  • Paul Monheimer BA ’78, BA ’79, MAT ’86 continues to teach at Catlin Gabel, a Portland-area independent school. He splits his time between Portland and Bend, Oregon, where the skiing, hiking, and kayaking tug at his heart. Monheimer and his wife, Pam, will travel to Philadelphia this spring for daughter Noa’s graduation from Penn. Monheimer encourages members of the class of ’79 to contact him if they are passing through Portland: “Any excuse to try a new microbrew,” he says. In May 2017, Monheimer and his daughter enjoyed a 37-year reunion with Munich friends Heini, Axel, Klaus, Josephine, and Heini’s son.

  • Bruce Glover BS ’78 recently retired from the U.S. Air Force, where he had served as a chaplain for more than 31 years. Glover, an ordained pastor in the Presbyterian Church U.S.A., served congregations in both Montana and Missouri before going on active duty in the USAF. After living in 10 states, South Korea, and the U.K., he and his wife of 34 years, Carol, are enjoying retirement in the Texas Hill Country outside of San Antonio.

  • Larry Burton BA ’78 is the new chief of staff for Alaska Senator Dan Sullivan.

  • Julia Duin BA ’78 offers an intimate and engrossing look at the latest generation of Pentecostal believers who “take up” venomous snakes as a test of their religious faith. Focusing on several preachers and their families in six Appalachian states, she explores the impact that such 21st-century phenomena as social media and reality television have had on rituals long practiced in obscurity.

    As Duin reveals, the mortal snakebite suffered by pastor Mack Wofford in 2012 marked the passing of the torch to younger preachers Jamie Coots and Andrew Hamblin, who were featured in the 2013 series Snake Salvation on the National Geographic Channel. Seeing their participation in the show as a way of publicizing their faith and thus winning converts, Coots and Hamblin attempted to reinvent the snake-handling tradition for a modern audience. The use of the internet, particularly Facebook, became another key part of their strategy to spread their particular brand of Christianity. However, Coots’s own death in 2014 was widely reported after the TV series was canceled, while Hamblin, who emerges as the central figure in the book, was arrested and tried after a shooting incident involving his estranged wife. His hopes of becoming a serpent-handling superstar seemingly dashed, Hamblin spent several months in prison, emerging more determined than ever to keep to the faith. By the end of the narrative, he has begun a new church where he can pass on the tradition to yet another generation.

    Duin’s thorough, sympathetic reporting and lively style bring the ecstatic church services she witnessed vividly to life, and through interviews and quotations from the principals’ Facebook postings, she has allowed them to express their beliefs and reveal their everyday lives in their own words. She also gives the reader an up-close view of how a reporter pursues a story and the various difficulties encountered along the way. These engrossing elements add up to a unique story of the ways in which the practitioners of a century-old custom-one that strikes most outsiders as bizarre-are adjusting to the challenges of the new millennium.

    University of Tennessee Press, 2017. 227 pages.

  • Was nominated by President Obama to a new term on the board of the State Justice Institute. The State Justice Institute awards grants to state courts to help foster innovative, efficient solutions to common issues faced by all courts. Nachtigal served on the Washington County bench from 1991 until 2013, and was presiding judge from 1996 to 2002. She has also been a Hillsboro attorney and formerly worked for the Washington County district attorney’s office.

  • Was named a cochair of Littler’s financial services industry group. Berkowitz, a shareholder, is based in the firm’s New York City office.

  • Julia Duin B.A. has been named the Snedden Chair (an endowed chair given to distinguished journalists) in the journalism department of the University of Alaska at Fairbanks for the 2014–15 academic year. Duin earned an M.A. (her second) in journalism this past December at the University of Memphis.

  • Philip Berkowitz J.D. was appointed 2014–15 vice-chair of the International Employment Law Committee of the American Bar Association Section of International Law. Berkowitz, a shareholder in the New York City office of Littler, is also the U.S. practice cochair of the firm’s international employment law practice group.

  • Philip McKinney BS ’78, May 26, 2015, age 63.

  • Ronald Marks BA was selected as a member of the board of directors of George Washington University’s Center for Cyber and Homeland Security.

  • Jose Torroella BA lives in Orlando, Florida. He’s been a self-employed attorney for the past 25 years and specializes in criminal defense. He has two children, Eileen and George, both of whom are in high school. He would love to see any Lewis & Clark alumni visiting in his area.

  • Was named vice chair of the Discrimination and Equality Law Committee of the International Bar Association through December 31, 2017. Berkowitz, a shareholder in Littler’s New York office and U.S. cochair of the firm’s international employment law practice group, will support and recommend initiatives to promote awareness of discrimination and equal opportunity issues in this role. He also serves as vice chair of the American Bar Association’s international employment law committee and previously chaired the New York State Bar Association’s International Law Practice Section.

  • Was a guest lecturer for a law class at the University of California at Davis. Tobiassen gave an overview of the federal regulatory system for alcohol, drawing on his knowledge as the former chief counsel for the Department of the Treasury’s Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.

  • Randall G. Baidas JD ’78, after a 30-year engagement, married William K. Reeves on June 21, 2014, at the North Pond in Chicago’s Lincoln Park. Their wedding was officiated by Prosser McKeever Watts Jr. The grooms were accompanied their sisters, Betty L. Conrad and Claudia R. Schwartz. A wedding reception for family and friends was held at the North Pond restaurant. Among those in attendance were Ann Lehman JD ’78, Jim Heisinger JD ’79, Tom Erwin JD ’80, and Robert Trotman JD ’78. The couple reside in Holland, Michigan, and Vail, Colorado.

  • Was honored by San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee on May 2014 for 20 years of advocating for women and girls. “Your dedication and service were instrumental in our city gaining international and nationwide recognition through the years and your service has bolstered San Francisco’s reputation as a leader in equality and justice for all,” said Lee. “You have blazed a trail for generations of San Francisco women, and our city thanks you for your many significant contributions.” Lehman is principal at Zimmerman Lehman, a consulting firm to nonprofits, located in El Cerrito, California.

  • Was appointed 2014-15 vice-chair of the International Employment Law Committee of the American Bar Association Section of International Law. Berkowitz, a shareholder in the New York City office of Littler, is also the U.S. practice cochair of the firm’s international employment law practice group. 

  • If the road you’re on isn’t taking you where you want to go, don’t be afraid to get off that road and get on a different one, or even to make a U-turn and go back the way you came.  The scenic route is slower, but you may enjoy it more than the cross-country interstate.

  • Was elected president of the Multnomah Bar Foundation. Glade is a shareholder with Markowitz Herbold Glade in Portland.

  • Was elected president of the Multnomah Bar Foundation. Glade is a shareholder with Markowitz Herbold Glade in Portland.

  • I am hopeful I can make it and look forward to reuniting with OLD classmates.
  • Law School
  • Sorry I will miss the reunion but I will be out of the country.
  • I look forward to seeing classmates, particularly with those I have not seen for years. For myself, I have been retired completely for 23 years by the time we gather, after private civil practice, as a consultant and employee to the State's then Senior and Disabled Services and Emerita Bar Member for some years. Still live in my own home and plan to remain here for the rest of my days, while continuing international travel. Have had to give up backpacking and even hiking though some years ago.
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