School navigation

Content tagged with "1974"

News

  • April 26
    John “JP” Powers JD ’74
  • November 27
    David Stoller B.A. ‘74 was recently inducted to the Ronald McDonald House Charities (RMHC) of Oregon and Southwest Washington Hall of Fame after a decade of work with the organization.
  • February 1
    2004
    Richard M. McCourt is an associate curator of botany at the Academy of Natural Sciences. His research on green algae helped answer a longstanding question about the evolution of land plants from aquatic ancestors. McCourt also spearheaded a project to renovate the storage conditions of the Lewis and Clark Herbarium, a collection of more than 200 dried plant specimens collected by Meriwether Lewis. He has coauthored several articles on the history and scientific uses of the collection, and coordinated presentations of the specimens at venues around the country.
  • February 1
    2000
    Don Johnson majored in political science and Spanish while at Lewis & Clark. Originally, he intended to pursue a legal career but became intrigued by international affairs while studying international law and foreign policy with Professor Carlin Capper-Johnson. On a whim, he took the Foreign Service Exam—and passed. Initially, he thought he would serve just a few years before pursuing his interest in law. But now, 26 years later, he is still dedicated to foreign affairs and the work of the U.S. Foreign Service.
  • February 1
    1997
  • February 1
    1996
  • February 1
    1996
  • February 1
    1995
  • February 1
    1992

Images

Blurbs

  • Cliff Johannsen BS ’71, MEd ’74 married Linda Newman BA ’71, JD ’90 in 1971, and they were together until Linda died in 2008. This marriage produced two daughters, Brynne and Amelia, and two grandchildren. Since 2011, he has been in a domestic partnership with Elizabeth Toness, whom he plans to marry in 2019. After earning a master’s degree in counseling, Johannsen worked as a group and marriage and family therapist. After earning his doctorate in psychology in 1982, he worked in two forensic hospitals and a community mental health program. Over the years, he has worked as a hospital administrator and a clinical director of wilderness therapy and substance abuse programs. Johannsen has been active in his field’s leadership at the state and national levels since 1989 and has been in private practice since 1995. He occasionally moonlights as a whitewater rafting guide. Although the Rogue is his home river, his favorite rivers to run have been the Middle Fork of the Idaho Salmon and the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. In addition, Johannsen builds and races vintage SAAB automobiles. He also enjoys travel and has visited various locations in North America, Ireland, Scotland, England, Holland, France, Spain, Italy, and Korea. At the time of this writing, he was looking forward to the reunion of the 1968-69 L&C overseas study program to Austria.

  • Gini Grossenbacher BA ’74 is an editor, speaker, teacher, and author of the novel Madam of My Heart, which was a 2017 Hollywood Book Festival Runner-Up.

  • Sharon Streeter MAT ’74 (writing under the nom de plume AJ Beauregard) pens her first work of humorous fiction about five eclectic musicians who unite to fulfill their goal of building a performance venue in Elvira, USA.

  • John “JP” Powers JD ’74 lost his valiant fight with acute myeloid leukemia on the morning of February 10, 2017. He passed away at home in Scottsdale, Arizona, with his beloved wife, Charlotte, by his side.

    JP was born to Opal and Clifford Powers on April 28, 1950, in Los Angeles, California. He graduated from North Hollywood High School in 1967 and completed his undergraduate degree at Occidental College in 1971. JP then moved to the Pacific Northwest for law school. He was one of the youngest individuals ever admitted to the Oregon State Bar.

    JP worked for two county district attorney offices in Oregon before he opened his own Portland law practice, which specialized in DUI defense and personal injury cases. He brought great compassion to his work and was driven to help others. Honored to represent his clients, JP also assisted them with finding serenity in their lives, including through introduction to AA.

    Devoted to sports from an early age, JP had a lifelong love for the Los Angeles Dodgers. His greatest passion as he grew older was golf. He even considered becoming a professional player. At the time of his passing, he had amassed almost 50 putters in his quest for perfection.

    JP will be forever missed for his quick wit, his disco dance moves, his sense of humor, his love for his family and friends, and the fullness with which he lived every day. He was devoted to Charlotte and to the children they each brought to their marriage—Sarah, Ben, Lindsey, and Mike. JP brought light into their lives, as well as those of their partners, his grandchildren, and his sister Linda and her family.

    In lieu of flowers, the family suggests that remembrances in JP’s memory be sent to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (lls.org).

  • Was named in the 2017 issue of The Best Lawyers in America for his work in the practice area of medical malpractice law—defendants and personal injury litigation—defendants.

  • Was named an Oregon Jewish Community Foundation’s Legacy Society Honoree, together with his wife, Elaine Kantor. The award recognizes the couple’s longstanding dedication to and support of Portland’s Jewish community and OJCF. Kantor is a past president and one of the founding members of the organization, as well as an inaugural member of the foundation’s professional advisors group.

  • Became administrator for Oregon’s Workers’ Compensation Division. Savage recently returned to Oregon after spending two and a half years providing consulting and training on law reform issues to attorneys in North Africa and the Middle East. A member of the Oregon State Bar, he has spent his career working on consumer and business issues in the nonprofit, private, and public sectors. Savage served as Oregon insurance commissioner from 2012 to 2013 and directed DCBS legislative activity as senior policy advisor from 2003 to 2012. Before joining the state, he served as director of Multnomah County Legal Aid and state director for Oregon Congressional Representative Ron Wyden’s office. Savage also spent 10 years in private law practice.

  • Mark Anderson BA earned his PhD in management in May 2015 from Northcentral University in Prescott Valley, Arizona. He now resides with his wife, Kathleen Anderson BA, in Ephraim, Utah, where he is assistant professor of business at Snow College.

  • Was named in the 2015 issue of Oregon Super Lawyers magazine for his work in medical malpractice law and personal injury litigation. Hart, a partner at Hart Wagner, has been honored in every issue of the magazine since its debut.

  • Presented a CLE, International Law Issues in Domestic Litigation, to the Multnomah Bar Association, with Lewis & Clark Associate Professor of Law George K. Foster. The presentation addressed how to handle some of the most common issues that arise in international civil litigation in the United States. Among the topics covered were personal jurisdiction, sovereign immunity, forum non conveniens, antisuit injunctions, extraterritorial discovery, enforcement of arbitration agreements and awards, and enforcement of foreign judgments.

  • Was named a 2015 Best Lawyer for his work in medical malpractice law and personal injury litigation.

  • Was honored as a Top 100 Criminal Defense Lawyer by the National Trial Lawyers. Powers has been a criminal defense lawyer in Portland for more than 30 years.

  • Was profiled in the January issue of the Oregon State Bar Bulletin. Helmer is a partner with Miller Nash.

  • Wrote an article, “U.S. Immigration Rule(s) Affecting Hijab,” which was published in Immigration Daily. Hijab (Arabic for “to cover”) is a concept of modest dressing that has resulted in a variety of headdresses and veils for Muslim women, and these articles of clothing have become a prominent symbol of religious faith. In several countries this expression of faith has led to political controversies and proposals for a legal ban.

  • Retired after serving as Clark County prosecutor for 30 years. Curtis was lauded for his professionalism and for shaping the prosecutor’s office into a place where attorneys want to spend their careers. He leaves office as Washington’s third-longest-serving county prosecutor in modern times, and he is looking forward to traveling and spending time with his two granddaughters.

  • Was selected to fill an upcoming vacancy on the federal bench in Reno. U.S. District Court Chief Judge Roger Hunt picked Cobb to replace U.S. Magistrate Judge Robert McQuaid Jr. on McQuaid’s retirement in September 2011. Cobb is one of two federal magistrates in Reno serving an eight-year term.

Share this story on