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Skylar Golleher

Skylar Golleher BA ’21
Skylar Golleher (she/her)

Class Year: 2021
Hometown: Little Rock, Arkansas
Majors: Economics and Environmental Studies (double)
Extracurriculars: SQRC Economics tutor, Environmental Studies SAAB representative, Volunteer for Portland Nightwatch
Overseas Study: Strasbourg (spring 2020)

What three words would you use to describe L&C?

Interesting, beautiful, academic

What made you want to come to Lewis & Clark?

I came to Lewis & Clark because I wanted to liberal arts experience of expanding my horizons with small class sizes and a variety of courses. However, I wanted access to a large city, not to be trapped on a small campus.

What’s your favorite class? How has it expanded your knowledge?

One of my favorite classes I have taken on campus was Macroeconomic Theory with Eric Tymoigne. I learned so much about the many ways to understand and run the economy while also being able to craft my own opinions on the various policies and changes to the financial system.

Who is your mentor on campus? Why do you consider this person your mentor?
“Calling for large scale, top-down policy change is the most effective way to combat climate change and also hold the bodies in power accountable for their actions.”

I would consider Professor Jim Proctor to be my mentor on campus. He serves as my faculty advisor and has given me lots of support and advice on how to best take advantage of my time here at Lewis & Clark. Additionally, he made it possible for me to serve as Student Academic Affairs Board (SAAB) representative for the environmental studies department, a position that is very important to me.

Why did you choose to major in ENVS?

I am majoring in ENVS because I see a problem that society is facing and I want to be equipped with the tools to be able to address these issues. This is an interdisciplinary major so I can choose my area of focus in order to gain skills and knowledge for the future.

How have your ENVS courses challenged—and perhaps even changed—your thinking?

One concept that has made a very lasting impact on me is the concept of individualized responsibility for solving environmental ailments. Before starting my time as an ENVS major, I felt that the only effective action that made a difference for our climate was to act with extreme care, never using plastic bottle or forgetting to recycle a scrap of paper. However, these small acts, while important, will not resolve the issues the earth is placing. Calling for large scale, top-down policy change is the most effective way to combat climate change and also hold the bodies in power accountable for their actions.

How did you weave your experiences outside ENVS into your ENVS courses

Because I am a double major, I can often utilize the skills I learn in economics when analyzing the variety of topics covered in ENVS. I am able to pursue my interests in business and economics from a variety of viewpoints, gaining more experience and understanding more narratives.

How will ENVS concepts be a part of your future?

I hope to work as a business consultant, specifically for companies looking to become more sustainable and environmentally conscious. I will be able to apply the many skills and broad theories that I have learned in ENVS to my work, making a lasting impact on the environment that is more than just recycling a few bottles.

What does the phrase Environment Across Boundaries mean to you

Environment across boundaries symbolizes the evolution of environmental studies academics. No longer does the environment involve educated scientists lecturing the public on their failures in sustainability. No longer are the underprivileged excluded from the discussion of climate change and environmental injustice. Environment across boundaries is a conversation that acknowledges the differences in experience, which will hopefully lead to an eventual collective cry for change. ENVS now strives to connect through similarities rather than dividing over differences.

What’s your favorite spot on campus?

I love going to South Campus and sitting on the lawn behind the Corbett House when it is sunny outside. It is great for sunbathing while doing homework, watching the sunset, and having picnics.

What’s your favorite thing about living in Portland?

All the food! Getting to try new cuisines and creative dishes is my favorite pastime.

How do you manage stress?

I make sure to find time to get at least 7 hours of sleep. I also like to workout and schedule out the tasks I need to accomplish in the day and week.

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