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Classics

Spring 2020 Courses

CLAS 100: Ancient Greek Myth
Dr. Robert A. Kugler
MWF 11:30-12:30

Myth was essential for the making of Greek identity in antiquity; by telling and retelling under ever-changing circumstances the stories of gods and goddesses, heroines and heroes, ancient Greeks expressed their evolving self-understanding to each other and the world around them. To understand the way Greeks used myth to define themselves, in this course we give a close reading to selections from our sources for Greek
myth—Homer, Hesiod, Greek tragedians, historians, and philosophers, and the Roman poet Ovid. In addition, we examine modern theories and contemporary popular uses of myth to determine how myth speaks to the ancient and modern world.

LATN 102: Begining Latin II
Dr. Gordon P. Kelly
MWF 10:20-11:20

Emphasis on basic vocabulary and grammar necessary to read Latin texts of the Classical period.

CLAS 202: Roman Thought and Culture                                                         
Dr. Gordon P. Kelly                                                                                    
MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ancient Roman thought and culture as reflected in archaeology, architecture, art, history, literature, philosophy, and religion. Special emphasis on the core values of ancient Roman culture, and how these compare or contrast to our own.

GRK 202: Advanced Greek
Dr. Robert A. Kugler
MWF 9:10-10:10

Advanced readings in the religious and secular literature of the Classical periods.

ART 208: Ancient Art
Dr. Benjamin David
MWF 10:20-11:20

A focused introduction to art and architecture of the ancient Mediterranean world from the Geometric period in the eighth century BCE to the end of the Roman Empire. Special attention given to the intersections of art and literature and the role of art as a tool of politics. Theories in classical culture about the visual image, the artist, and the practice of narrative; how our definition of classical art is often shaped by the views taken in the early modern period.

HIST 219: Ancient Rome
Dr. Gordon P. Kelly
TTH 1:50-3:20

A history of Rome from the foundation of the Roman Republic in the late 6th century B.C. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 A.D. Specia emphasis on Rome’s political transformation from a republic to an empire and the effect of this transition on Roman civilization. Topics include Roman conquest and imperialism, religion, contact with other Mediterranean cultures, class conflict, law and governance, slavery, and family structure. The interpretation of primary-source materials (especially ancient historical writings) and the problems of reconstructing the history of a civilization that flourished 2,000 years ago.

RELS 225: Christian Origins
Dr. Robert A. Kugler
MWF 12:40-1:40

Exploration of early Christianity, from the turn of the eras to 400 C.E. Focus on the development of the religion in the multicultural, pluralistic context of the Greco-Roman world. Study of the archaeological and written evidence for Christian origins (i.e., the archaeology of Jerusalem, the Galilee, and the Dead Sea Scrolls community; the New Testament, the writings of “orthodox” and “heretical” early Christian thinkers, the Dead Sea Scrolls, and other relevant Judean texts). Analysis of key themes in early Christian studies
(i.e., gender, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, early Christianity’s relationship to early Judaism, Christianity and empire).

POLS 310: Plato to Machiavelli
Dr. John S. Holzwarth
TTH 1:50-3:20

Great works of political philosophy from ancient Greece and Rome, early Christianity, and the Renaissance. Themes include the foundations of morality and justice, the role of hierarchy in politics, and the role of politics in cultivating human excellence. Works may include Thucydides’ History of the Peloponnesian War; Plato’s Apology, Crito, and Republic; Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Politics; Augustine’s City of God;
and Machiavelli’s The Prince, among others.

Classics

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