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History

Spring Course Offerings

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or Webadvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.

SPRING 2016

HIST 121: Modern European History
MWF 9:10-10:10
David Galaty


Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolutions, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisites: None 

HIST 134: US: Revolution to Empire
TTH 1:50-3:20

Reiko Hillyer

Introduction to United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of politi- cal parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 142: Modern Latin American History
TTH 9:40-11:10
Elliott Young

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries.

Prerequisites: None

HIST 213: Chinese History Through Biography
TTH 1:50-3:20
Susan Glosser

Political, economic, and cultural history of China, traced through the lives of individual Chinese, including the mighty and the low: venerable philosophers and historians, powerful women, mighty emperors, conscientious officials, laboring women and men, evangelizing missionaries, zealots of all political persuasions. Sixth century B.C.E. to late 20th century, with emphasis on the 19th and 20th centuries. Lectures cover historical milieu in which various subjects lived. Through class discussion and essay assignments, students unite their knowledge of particular individuals and the broad sweep of events to form a rich and lively familiarity with Chinese history.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing unless section number is preceded by an “F.”


HIST 242: Borderland: US-Mexico-16th Century to Present
MW 3:00-4:30
Elliott Young

The concept and region known as the Borderlands from when it was part of norther New Spain to its present incarnation as the U.S.-Mexico border. Thematic focus on the roles of imperialism and capitalism in the formation of borderlands race, class, gender, and national identities. The transformation of this region from a frontier between European empires to a borderline between nations.

Prerequisites: None

 

HIST 259: India: Age of Empire 500-1800
MWF 9:10-10:10
David Campion

The political, cross-cultural, and social development of the Indian subcontinent from the classical civilizations of late antiquity to the beginning of colonial rule in the 18th century. The artistic and architectural achievements of Indo-Islamic civilization; the Mughal Empire and regional policies; religious and cultural syncretism; the influence of contact with the West. Special emphasis on the historical antecedents of contemporary debates about regional identities, state formation and fragmentation, and the origins of colonial rule.

Prerequisites: None

 

HIST 297-01: History of Science, Technology, and Culture
MWF 1:50-2:50
David Galaty

Focus on the mutual interaction of science, technology, and culture in Europe from the scientific revolution to the modernist revolution, 1600-1920. We examine the origins of our ideas about the natural and human worlds, our use of these ideas to create an increasingly human-made world, and the ways in which new cultural forms stimulate new scientific and technological ideas

Prerequisites: None

 

HIST 300: Historical Materials
TTH 11:30-1:00
Andrew Bernstein

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; consent of instructor required.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

 

HIST 310: China Discovers the West: Silk, Jesuits, Tea, Opium, and Milk
TTH 11:30-1:00
Susan Glosser

The nature and extent of China’s contact with other countries, including the silk roads to Middle Asia in the first millennium B.C.E., Jesuits and the influx of Spanish-American silver in the 16th century, British tea and opium trade, and Chinese intellectual experiments with social Darwinism, anarchism, communism, and the nuclear family ideal. Primary sources showing foreign and Chinese perceptions of the content and significance of these exchanges.

Prerequisites: None; consent of instructor required.

 

HIST 320: Humanism in Renaissance Europe
MWF 10:20-11:20PM
Benjamin Westervelt

Writings by major figures in the humanist movement fromt eh 14th to the 16th century. Social, political, intellectual contexts of humanism in the university and Italian city-state; ideal of return to sources of classical culture; civic humanism and the Protestant Reformation; comparative experience of Renaissance humanists and artists.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

HIST 335: HIstory and Culture of American Indians
MW 3:00-4:30
Khalil Johnson

Purposes of archaeology and its contributions to the understanding of North American prehistory, the culture-area hypothesis, relations with tribes from colonial times to the present, Native American responses.  Federal Indian policy and its evolution over the past 200 years.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

HIST 347: Mexico: Culture / Politics / Economy
TTH 1:50-3:20
Elliott Young

Origins and development of the modern Mexican nation from independence to the contemporary economic and political crisis. 1811 to 1940: liberal-conservative battles, imperialism, the pax Porfiriana, the Mexican Revolution, industrialization, and institutionalizing the revolution. 1940 to the present: urbanization, migration to the United States, the student movement, neoliberal economics and politics, disintegration of the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party), and the new social rebellions (Zapatistas, Popular Revolutionary Army, Civil Society). Constructing mexicanidad in music, dance, film, and cultural poetics of the street and the town plaza.

Prerequisites: HIST 141 or HIST 142 recommended.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

  

HIST 400: Colloquium 
T 6:00-9:00
Jane Hunter

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

HIST 450: History Seminar
T 6:00-9:00
Maureen Healy

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: History 300. Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.

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