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Spring Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2018

 

HIST 121-01: Modern European History
David Galaty

MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolution, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits 

 

HIST 134-01: United States: Revolution to Empire
Reiko Hillyer
TTh 1:50-3:20

Introduction to the United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of political parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 142-01: Modern Latin American History
Elliott Young
TTh 9:40-11:10

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 209: Japan at War
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20

In-depth study of the causes, dynamics, and outcomes of the wars fought by Japan in Asia and the Pacific from the late 19th century through World War II. The trajectories of Japanese imperialism, sequence of events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor, social impact of total war. Japan’s wartime culture as seen through diaries, newspaper articles, propaganda films, short stories, government documents. Short- and long-term effects of the atomic bomb and the American occupation of Japan.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 213: Personal Narratives in Chinese History
Susan Glosser
TTh 9:40-11:10

Political, economic, and cultural history of China, traced through the lives of individual Chinese, including the mighty and the low: venerable philosophers and historians, powerful women, mighty emperors, conscientious officials, laboring women and men, evangelizing missionaries, zealots of all political persuasions. Sixth century B.C.E. to late
twentieth century, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lectures cover the historical milieu in which the various subjects lived. Through class discussion and essay assignments, students unite their knowledge of particular individuals and the broad sweep of events to form a rich and lively familiarity with Chinese history.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 217: The Emergence of Modern South Asia
David Campion
MWF 9:10-10:10

The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 219: Ancient Rome
Gordon Kelly
TTh 1:50-3:20

A history of Rome from the foundation of the Roman Republic in the late 5th century B.C. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 A.D. Special emphasis on Rome’s political transformation from a republic to an empire and the effect of this transition on Roman civilization. Topics include Roman conquest and imperialism, religion, contact with other Mediterranean cultures, class conflict, law and governance, slavery, and family structure. The interpretation of primary source materials (especially ancient historical writings) and the problems of reconstructing the history of a civilization that flourished 2,000 years ago.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 242: Borderlands - U.S.-Mexico Border, 16th Century-Present
Elliott Young
TTh 1:50-3:20

The concept and region known as the Borderlands from when it was part of northern New Spain to its present incarnation as the U.S.-Mexico border.
Thematic focus on the roles of imperialism and capitalism in the formation of borderlands race, class, gender, and national identities. The transformation of this region from a frontier between European empires to a borderline between nations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 264: From Stumptown to Portlandia - The History of Portland
Reiko Hillyer
W 3:00-6:00

An introduction to research in historical methods by examining the history of Portland: How did the city go from rough-and-tumble center of the timber industry to hipster mecca? Examination of Portland’s origins as a port city to the gentrification of more recent times, including exploration of various types of historical sources, from fire-insurance maps to police
surveillance photographs. Two major research projects are included: 1) construct the “biography” of a city block, and 2) in small groups, write and deliver walking tours of various Portland neighborhoods.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 298: Literature and History of 20th-Century Britain
David Campion and Rishona Zimring
TTh 9:40-11:10

The literature and history of Britain throughout the 20th century. Literary study may focus on, but is not limited to, the Bloomsbury Group, the War Poets (World War I), Evelyn Waugh, George Orwell, Philip Larkin, Salman Rushdie, Alice Oswald, Ian McEwan, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Angela Carter, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. Historical topics will include the First World War; interwar politics, society and class dynamics; British involvement in the Spanish Civil War; British society in the Second World War; building the welfare state; postwar decolonization and immigration; popular culture in the 1960s and ’70s; Thatcherism; and multicultural British society going into the 21st century.

 Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                        Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

   

HIST 300: Historical Materials
Andrew Bernstein
MW 3:00-4:30

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps,
government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required

 

HIST 320: Humanism in Renaissance Europe
Benjamin Westervelt
TTh 1:50-3:20

Writings by major figures in the humanist movement from the 14th to the 16th century. Social, political, intellectual contexts of humanism in the university and Italian city-state; ideal of return to sources of classical culture; civic humanism; interplay between Christian and secular ideals; relationship between Italian and northern forms of humanism; relationship between Renaissance humanism and the Protestant Reformation; comparative experience of Renaissance humanists and artists.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                              Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 326: History of Soviet Russia
Maureen Healy
TTh 11:30-1:00

Examines tensions (political, social, cultural) of the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and traces the collapse of the 300-year-old empire during the First World War. Focus is largely on the 20th century. Topics include the Russian Revolution, “Soviet Man” (Homo Sovieticus), Stalinism, collectivization, terror, the “Great Patriotic War,” Cold War culture, the
Sovietization of Eastern Europe, the Brezhnev era, reforms of the Gorbachev period, the end of the Soviet Union, and legacies for Russia and the other successor states. Attention throughout to gender, family, nation, and concept of the individual in relation to the collective.

Prerequisites: None; HIST 121 recommended, 4 semester credits                   Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 388: What’s for Dinner
Susan Glosser
TTh 11:30-1:00

Cross-cultural examination of the history and cultural, political, and economic power of food. Topics include the power and politics exercised
through ethnic/racial, gender, and class differences in food consumption; ways in which people express their religious, ethnic, class, gender, and regional identities through food; nostalgia for the food ways of the past and ideas about the food of the future; the history of manners and the cultural value of food etiquette; and “nutritionism,” or why we think certain things
are good for us. Materials include scholarly and popular books and essays, as well as primary sources.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 397: Civil Rights in History
Reiko Hillyer
TTh 9:40-11:10

Advanced study in the research and writing of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship; exposure to major debates and controversies in the field that may include, but are not limited to, comparative study, historiography, or interdisciplinary methodology. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research.
Assignments are organized around a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium
Benjamin Westervelt
MW 3:00-4:30

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 450: History Seminar
Jane Hunter
TTh 9:40-11:10

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching
field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits                                           Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

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