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History

Spring Course Offerings

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or Webadvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.

HIST 112: Making Modern Japan
MWF 10:20-11:20AM
Andrew Bernstein

History of Japan from the start of the Tokugawa shogunate to the end of the 20th century. Tokugawa ideology, political economy, urban culture; intellectual and social upheavals leading to the Meiji Restoration; the Japanese response to the West; rapid industrialization and its social consequences; problems of modernity and the emperor system; Japanese colonialism and milita- rism; the Pacific war; postwar developments in economy, culture, politics.

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 121: Modern European History
TTH 9:40-11:10 AM
Maureen Healy

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolutions, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisites: None 

HIST 134: US: Revolution to Empire
TTH 1:50-3:20PM

Reiko Hillyer

Introduction to United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of politi- cal parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 142: Modern Latin American History
TTH 9:40-11:10 AM
Elliott Young

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries.

Prerequisites: None

HIST 211: Reform, Rebellion & Revolution in Modern China
MW 3:00-4:30PM
Susan Glosser

The commercial revolution of the 12th century and the cultural flowering and political structures of Ming and early Qing dynasties (1367 to 1800) that shaped China’s response to Western invasion. Major peasant rebel- lions, elite reforms, and political revolutions of the last 150 years including the Opium War, Taiping Rebellion, Hundred Days Reform, Boxer Rebellion, col- lapse of the Qing dynasty, Nationalist and Communist revolutions.

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 216: Greek History
Gordon Kelly
TTH 9:40-11:10AM

HIST 231A: U.S. Women’s History
MWF 12:40-1:40PM
Jane Hunter

The diverse experiences of American women from the colonial era to the recent past. Changing ideologies from the colonial goodwife to the cult of true womanhood. Impact of Victorianism, sexuality and reproduction, the changing significance of women’s work. Origins of the women’s rights move- ment, battles and legacy of suffrage, history of 20th-century feminism, compet- ing ideologies and experiences of difference.

Prerequisite: None

HIST 298: African American History 1865 to Present
TTH 9:40-11:10AM
Reiko Hillyer

This course will be a survey of African American history from emancipation to the present.  We will examine the process of emancipaiton, Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression and the transformation of the rural South, the civil rights movement, black power and white backlash, the rise of the prison-industrial complex, and the development of hip-hop culture.  We will supplement our reading of written primary and secondary sources with an examination of art, film, and theater.  

HIST 298: Researching and Writing Public History
MTH 3:00-4:30PM/3:30-5:00PM
Jane Hunter
This course is a workshop designed to introduce qualified students to the skills, disciplines, and pleasures of researching and writing history for the broader public.  Most students will investigate local and community history topics based in Oregon, learn to check their findings in authoritative databases, and write multiple drafts of short and compelling articles designed to inform and engage a broad range of readers.  As part of their research, students may need to conduct interviews with participants, other scholars, local librarians, or with other members of the community.  We will do some reading in common, and critique each others work with the goal of producing short articles of high-enough quality to be submitted to designated editorial boards, curated websites, or local newspapers for possible publication.  Each student will need to identify an intended outlet for their work at the outset of the course.

Prerequisites: None; consent of instructor required.

HIST 300: Historical Materials
TTH 11:30-1:00PM
Jane Hunter

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 

HIST 316: Popular Culture/Everyday Life in Japanese History
MW 3:00-4:30PM
Andrew Bernstein

Popular culture as the site of social change and social control in Japan from the 18th to the 20th century.  Religion and folk beliefs, work and gender roles, theatre and music, tourism, consumerism, citizens’ movements, fashion, food, sports, sex, drugs, hygiene, and forms of mass media ranging from woodblock prints to modern comic books, film, television.  Concepts as well as content of popular and mass culture.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

HIST 320: Humanism in Renaissance Europe
MWF 9:10-10:10AM
David Galaty

Writings by major figures in the humanist movement from the 14th to the 16th century. Social, political, intellectual contexts of humanism in the university and Italian city-state; ideal of return to sources of classical culture; civic humanism; interplay between Christian and secular ideals; relation- ship between Italian and northern forms of humanism; relationship between Renaissance humanism and the Protestant Reformation; comparative experi- ence of Renaissance humanists and artists.

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

HIST 326: History of Soviet Russia
TTH 11:30-1:00PM
Maureen Healy

Examines tensions (political, social, cultural) of the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and traces the collapse of the 300-year-old empire during the First World War. Focus is largely on the 20th century. Topics include the Russian Revolution, “Soviet Man” (Homo Sovieticus), Stalinism, collectivization, terror, the “Great Patriotic War,” Cold War culture, the Sovietization of Eastern Europe, the Brezhnev era, reforms of the Gorbachev period, the end of the Soviet Union, and legacies for Russia and the
other successor states. Attention throughout to gender, family, nation, and concept of the individual in relation to the collective.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 

HIST 400: Reading Colloquium - Disasters in History
TTH 1:50-3:20PM
Andrew Bernstein

In this course students will explore the various ways historians have written about disasters ranging from earthquakes to toxic spills.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 

HIST 450: History Seminar
T 6:00-9:00 PM
Elliot Young

This seminar will focus on migrations and diasporas in the Americas.  Ever since indigenous people migrated across the Bering strait 40,000 years ago, the Americas has been a site of multiple and overlapping migrations.  Students may choose to focus on forced migrations of African slaves, voluntary migrations of Europeans, or those in-between migrations of contract laborers. Focus may be on migrations to any nation-state in the Americas, within any nation-state, and between countries in the Americas.  Possible topics include: Great Migration of African Americans, Chinese contract labor, Mexican braceros, Cuban refugees, Japanese in Brazil, Chinese in Cuba, and Italians in New York.  We will be reading a few theoretical articles on migration and diaspora studies, but most of the course will require students to read their own primary and secondary sources.

Prerequisites: History 300. Consent of instructor.

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