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Spring Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2020

 

HIST 111-01: Making Modern China
Susan Glosser
MWF 10:20-11:20

The history of China from the Song to the end of the twentieth century through primary sources (art, material culture of daily life, short stories, memoirs, political propaganda, and government documents, and music). We’ll examine family, gender roles, sexuality, political and social structures, urbanization, resistance to Western imperialism, popular rebellions, World War Two, revolution, nationalism, modernization, the role of historical memory in contemporary China.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 121-01: Modern European History
Mo Healy

T/TH 9:40-11:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolution, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits  

 

HIST 134-01: United States: Revolution to Empire
Nancy Gallman
MWF 11:30-12:30

Introduction to the United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of political parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 142-01: Modern Latin American History
Elliott Young
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 209-F1: Japan at War
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20

In-depth study of the causes, dynamics, and outcomes of the wars fought by Japan in Asia and the Pacific from the late 19th century through World War II. The trajectories of Japanese imperialism, sequence of events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor, social impact of total war. Japan’s wartime culture as seen through diaries, newspaper articles, propaganda films, short stories, government documents. Short- and longterm effects of the atomic bomb and the American occupation of Japan.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 217-F1: The Emergence of Modern South Asia
David Campion
MWF 9:10-10:10

The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 219-F1: Ancient Rome
Gordon Kelly
T/TH 1:50-3:20

A history of Rome from the foundation of the Roman Republic in the late 6th century B.C. to the end of the Severan dynasty in 235 A.D. Special emphasis on Rome’s political transformation from a republic to an empire and the effect of this transition on Roman civilization. Topics include Roman conquest and imperialism, religion, contact with other Mediterranean cultures, class conflict, law and governance, slavery, and family structure. The interpretation of primary source materials (especially ancient historical writings) and the problems of reconstructing the history of a civilization that flourished 2,000 years ago.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


HIST 227-F1: Medieval Europe 800-1400
Ben Westervelt
MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and cultural elements of European life during the period from about 800 to 1400. Emphasis on Christianity as a dominant aspect of public life; feudalism and other forms of economic and social life; developing conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical institutions; emergence of European nation-states; contacts with the non-European world; high medieval culture.

Prerequisites: HIST 120 recommended; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 297-01: Special Topics in History: Fact, Fiction, Film
Ben Westervelt
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Introduction to the practice and research methods of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship organized around themes or problems in history. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research. Assignments are organized around a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.

 Prerequisites: None.                                                                       Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

  

HIST 297-02: Special Topics in History: Native Peoples in North America
Nancy Gallman
M/W 3:00-4:30

Introduction to the practice and research methods of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship organized around themes or problems in history. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research. Assignments are organized around a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.

Prerequisites: None.                                                                        Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

 

HIST 300-01: Historical Materials
Andrew Bernstein
M/W 3:00-4:30

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

 

HIST 326-01: History of Soviet Russia
Mo Healy
T/TH 11:30-1:00

Examines tensions (political, social, cultural) of the final decades of the Romanov dynasty and traces the collapse of the 300-year-old empire
during the First World War. Focus is largely on the 20th century. Topics include the Russian Revolution, “Soviet Man” (Homo Sovieticus),
Stalinism, collectivization, terror, the “Great Patriotic War,” Cold War culture, the Sovietization of Eastern Europe, the Brezhnev era, reforms of the Gorbachev period, the end of the Soviet Union, and legacies for Russia and the other successor states. Attention throughout to gender, family, nation, and concept of the individual in relation to the collective.

Prerequisites: HIST 121 recommended; 4 semester credits                              Restrictions: Junior standing required.

   

HIST 338-01: Inside Out: Crime & Punishment
Reiko Hillyer
Friday 1:00-4:00

The rise of the carceral state in the United States, including crime in different historical eras and the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. Sub-topics include the changing role of the police; changing definitions of what constitutes a crime; the evolution of the prison system; the rise of convict labor; the political economy of the recent prison boom; the emergence of the victims’ rights and prisoners’ rights movements; the privatization of prisons; differences in treatment based on race, gender, and age. Course will take place in a nearby correctional facility.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Interested students must submit a formal application to be considered for the course. For details, please contact the instructor. Junior standing required

 

HIST 347-01: Modern Mexico: Culture, Politics, and Economic Crisis
Elliott Young
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Origins and development of the modern Mexican nation from independence to the contemporary economic and political crisis. 1811 to 1940: liberal-conservative battles, imperialism, the pax Porfiriana, the Mexican Revolution, industrialization, and institutionalizing the revolution. 1940 to the present: urbanization, migration to the United States, the student movement, neoliberal economics and politics, disintegration of the PRI (Institutional Revolutionary Party), and the new social rebellions (Zapatistas, Popular Revolutionary Army, Civil Society). Constructing mexicanidad in music, dance, film, and the cultural poetics of the street and the town plaza.

Prerequisites: HIST 141 or 142 recommended; 4 semester credits                 Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium
Elliott Young
Tuesday 6:00-9:00PM

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

HIST 450-01: History Seminar
Reiko Hillyer
Wednesday 6:00-9:00PM

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits                                        Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

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