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Spring Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2019

 

HIST 112-01: Making Modern Japan
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20

History of Japan from the start of the Tokugawa shogunate to the end of the 20th century. Tokugawa ideology, political economy, urban culture; intellectual and social upheavals leading to the Meiji Restoration; the Japanese response to the West; rapid industrialization and its social consequences; problems of modernity and the emperor system; Japanese colonialism and militarism; the Pacific war; postwar developments in economy, culture, politics.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 121: Modern European History
David Galaty

MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolution, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits 

 

HIST 134: United States: Revolution to Empire
Ashley Black
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Introduction to the United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of political parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 142: Modern Latin American History
Ashley Black
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 213-F1: Personal Narratives in Chinese History
Susan Glosser
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Political, economic, and cultural history of China, traced through the lives of individual Chinese, including the mighty and the low: venerable philosophers and historians, powerful women, mighty emperors, conscientious officials, laboring women and men, evangelizing missionaries, zealots of all political persuasions. Sixth century B.C.E. to late twentieth century, with emphasis on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Lectures cover the historical milieu in which the various subjects lived. Through class discussion and essay assignments, students unite their knowledge of particular individuals and the broad sweep of events to form a rich and lively familiarity with Chinese history.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 217: The Emergence of Modern South Asia
David Campion
MWF 9:10-10:10

The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 216-F1: Ancient Greece
Gordon Kelly
T/TH 1:50-3:20

An introduction to the history and civilization of Ancient Greece, from the early Archaic era in mid-8th-century BC to the death of Socrates in 399 BC. Topics include constitutional changes from monarchy through oligarchy and tyranny to democracy, the development of the Greek polis, contacts with Near Eastern civilizations, hegemony and imperialism, social structure, trade, and colonization. Readings will focus on ancient historical writings in translation and will highlight the challenges in interpreting evidence from antiquity.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


HIST 239-F1: Constructing American Landscape
Reiko Hillyer
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Political, social, economic, and aesthetic forces that have helped shape ordinary built environments: farms, fast-food restaurants, theme parks, sports stadiums, highways, prisons, public housing. Patterns of economic growth and decline, technological innovation, segregation, gentrification, capital migration and globalization, historic preservation, and changing ideologies about nature and the city.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 240-F1: Race & Ethnicity in the United States
Reiko Hillyer
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Investigation of the history of categories of race and ethnicity in the United States, primarily focused on the historical production of conceptions of racial and ethnic difference. Examines the origins, uses, and mutations of ideologies of race and ethnicity, as well as how these ideologies intersect with empire and nationalism, sexuality and gender, capitalism and labor relations, and scientific knowledge. Considers both chronological and thematic approaches. Examines scholarly work, visual culture, and memoir.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 259-F1: India: Age of Empire
David Campion
MWF 9:10-10:10

The political, cross-cultural, and social development of the Indian subcontinent from the classical civilizations of late antiquity to the beginnings of colonial rule in the 18th century. The artistic and architectural achievements of Indo-Islamic civilization; the Mughal Empire and regional polities; religious and cultural syncretism; the influence of contact with the West. Special emphasis on the historical antecedents of contemporary debates about regional identities, state formation and fragmentation, and the origins of colonial rule.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 300-01: Historical Materials
David Campion
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

   

HIST 311-01: History of Family & Gender in China
Susan Glosser
T/TH 11:30-1:00

Development of family structure, gender roles, and sexuality in Chinese history, explored through oracle bones, family instructions, tales of exemplary women, poetry, painting, drama, fiction, and calendar posters. Key movements in the transformation of family and gender from 1600 B.C.E. to the 20th century. Close readings of texts to explore how social, economic, religious, and political forces shaped family and gender roles.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required

 

HIST 316-01: Popular Culture & Everyday Life in Japanese History
Andrew Bernstein
MW 3:00-4:30

Popular culture as the site of social change and social control in Japan from the 18th to the 20th century. Religion and folk beliefs, work and gender roles, theatre and music, tourism, consumerism, citizens’ movements, fashion, food, sports, sex, drugs, hygiene, and forms of mass media ranging from woodblock prints to modern comic books, film, television. Concepts as well as content of popular and mass culture.

Prerequisites: HIST 112 recommended; 4 semester credits                               Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

HIST 338-01: Crime & Punishment
Reiko Hillyer
Friday 1:00-4:00

The rise of the carceral state in the United States, including crime in different historical eras and the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. Sub-topics include the changing role of the police; changing definitions of what constitutes a crime; the evolution of the prison system; the rise of convict labor; the political economy of the recent prison boom; the emergence of the victims’ rights and prisoners’ rights movements; the privatization of prisons; differences in treatment based on race, gender, and age. Course will take place in a nearby correctional facility.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                        

Restrictions: Interested students must submit a formal application to be considered for the course. For details, please contact the instructor. Junior standing required.

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium
Ashley Black
M/TH 3-4:30/3:30-5

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                             Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 450-01: History Seminar - Making Europe
Benjamin Westervelt
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits                                        Restrictions: Sophomore standing required.

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