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History

Spring Course Offerings

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or Webadvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.

HIST 112: Making Modern Japan
MWF 12:40-1:40pm
Craig Colbeck
Miller 104

History of Japan from the start of the Tokugawa shogunate to the end of the 20th century. Tokugawa ideology, political economy, urban culture; intellectual and social upheavals leading to the Meiji Restoration; the Japanese response to the West; rapid industrialization and its social consequences; problems of modernity and the emperor system; Japanese colonialism and milita- rism; the Pacific war; postwar developments in economy, culture, politics.

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 121: Modern European History
TTH 9:40-11:10am
David Galaty
Miller 205

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolutions, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisites: None 

HIST 134: US: Revolution to Empire
TTH 1:50-3:20pm

Reiko Hillyer
Miller 205

Introduction to United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of politi- cal parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisite: None

HIST 142: Modern Latin American History
MW 3:00-4:30pm
Tamara Feinstein
Miller 104

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries.

Prerequisites: None

HIST 198: Modern African History
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Zachary Poppel
Miller 104

Survey of Africa’s social and political history focusing on continuities and changes in African cultures and economies, and the continent’s relations with the outside world since 1800. Together we will analyze the lives of a spectrum of historical actors—pan-Africanists, colonial officials, novelists, farmers—and engage a range of historical interpretations of the past, present and futures of North, South, East, West and Central Africa. 

Prerequisite: None 

HIST 217: Emergence of Modern South Asia
MWF 9:10-10:10am
David Campion
Miller 210

The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.

Prerequisites: None.

HIST 223: War & Society
MWF 10:20-11:20am
Ben Westervelt
Miller 104

Examines several critical junctures between 490 B.C.E. and 1650 C.E. when European society was transformed by organization for military purposes and by the development of new military technology. Topics include the “hoplite revolution” and Ancient Greece, Rome and the professionalization of warfare, feudal structures and the monopoly on violence in medieval Europe, technology and “total war” in the Hundred Years War, society and naval technology in the 16th century, and the “military revolution” of the 16th century

Prerequisites: None.

HIST 262: Researching/Writing Public History
M 3:00-4:30pm/TH 3:30-5:00pm
Jane Hunter
Miller 414

This course will be a survey of African American history from emancipation to the present.  We will examine the process of emancipaiton, Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression and the transformation of the rural South, the civil rights movement, black power and white backlash, the rise of the prison-industrial complex, and the development of hip-hop culture.  We will supplement our reading of written primary and secondary sources with an examination of art, film, and theater

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.  

HIST 298-F1: History of the Nuclear Age
MWF 10:20-11:20pm
Craig Colbeck
JRHH 244

This course covers as much of the history of the nuclear age as will fit into one semester—everything from the discoveries of atomic science; to the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki; to the Cold War cultures of atomic testing, fear of nuclear annihilation, and waves of protest; to the power-plant disasters of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl; to the proliferation of nuclear weapons in Pakistan, India, North Korea, and Iran; to the 2011 Fukushima Daiichi disaster. These ongoing environmental crises and Cold-War-style geopolitics we see today will echo across our lifetimes. We will investigate these issues through film, news media, and scholarly works.

Prerequisite: None

HIST 298-F2: Political Violence and Human Rights in Latin America
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
Tamara Feinstein
JRHH 102

Political violence and human rights abuses pervaded the Latin American landscape throughout the latter half of the twentieth century. This violence took different forms in different regions of the Western Hemisphere. Yet whatever the form of this violence, the repercussions impacted political horizons, social relations, cultural representations, and the very memory of those who lived through this era. Structurally, the course is split into three units: each unit explores one of three different genres of political violence and looks in depth at a distinct country case study that embodies that form of violence. The course will begin with an examination of the Southern Cone dirty wars, with a case study in Argentina. These dirty wars were characterized by authoritarian military dictatorships, disproportionately small or non- existent insurgent threats, and a large number of detained, disappeared and murdered citizens targeted by the state. The second unit will look at the Central American civil wars, with a case study in Guatemala. These civil wars were characterized by militarized states, often under dictatorships or governments with questionable democratic credentials, strong popular insurgencies, and a proportion of violence with an overwhelming number of atrocities attributable to the state. The third unit will look at the Andean civil wars, with a case study in Peru. These conflicts were characterized by fragile democratic regimes, insurgent forces that blurred the line between guerrilla warfare and terrorism, and a proportion of violence more equally spread between state and insurgent forces.

Prerequisites: None.

HIST 298-F3: Environmental History of Modern West Africa
MWF 11:30am-12:30pm
Zachary Poppel
JRHH 124

Focuses on relations between natural resources, colonization and decolonization in West Africa from mid-19th century to present day. We’ll follow food and raw materials (onions, rice, cocoa, oil and minerals) and examine famines, export booms, and land rights in order to appreciate colonial and postcolonial transformations in the environmental history of West Africa. In addition to seeing how the value and meaning of food and raw materials change over time in West Africa, we’ll also learn to evaluate competing environmental agendas and changes in environmental knowledge from the soil up.  

Prerequisites: None.

HIST 300: Historical Materials
TTH 11:30-1:00pm
Jane Hunter
Miller 414

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing. 

HIST 338: Inside Out: Crime and Punishment
F 1:00-4:00pm
Reiko Hillyer
Off-campus

Criminal justice is one of the most important and controversial issues in contemporary America. Given that the United States has the highest incarceration rate in the world, it is crucial that as citizens we understand how this came to be. This course will trace the rise of the carceral state in the United States, examining how Americans have reckoned with crime in different historical eras as well as the various ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. The course will explore subtopics such as the changing role of the police, changing definitions of what constitutes a crime, the evolution of the prison system, the rise of convict labor, the political economy of the recent prison boom, the emergence of the victims’ rights and prisoners’ rights movements, the privatization of prisons, and the War on Drugs. The reading material will include works of history, literature, and memoir. The most distinctive aspect of this course is that it will be taught on the Inside-Out model, meaning that the course will take place in a nearby correctional facility. Half the members of the class will be incarcerated students, and half will be L&C students. Both the inmates and the students will undergo a screening process. There are no prerequisites for the course, but as there are a limited number of spots (15), Lewis & Clark students will have to write application essays and be interviewed by the instructor for admission.

Prerequisites: Sophomore standing; enrollment by application only.

HIST 398-01: Gender and Sexuality in East Asia
MW 3:00-4:30pm
Craig Colbeck
JRHH 116

This course explores the history of East Asia through the lens of gender/sexuality. Topics include marriage, prostitution, labor, reproduction, political participation, protest, warfare, and imperialism. We will draw on images, novels, scholarship, petitions, testimonies to explore male, female, and more genders. The focus will be on Japan and China, but will incorporate Korea and Vietnam.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

HIST 398-02: Race and Popular Music in US History
MW 3:00-4:30pm
Khalil Johnson
JRHH 244

This course explores a multicultural history of the United States in sound and song. As Ronald Radano, one of the scholars we will read this semester, has argued, the ways we discuss music can have a tangible influence on the social and political world, because debates about music stand in for larger social issues with real life consequences. We will read texts that demonstrate how music has facilitated the creation of American identities that recognize and celebrate difference, while offering alternate visions for what it means to be (and sound) American. We will music as primary sources in order to investigate how musical genres may act as reservoirs of shared history and collective identity. And through diverse topics ––from blues music and the rise of Jim Crow to 19th century tribal dancers draped in American flags on the Pine Ridge reservation to connections between elevator music and the Spanish American war––we will learn about how music and race have intersected with broader themes in U.S. history such as segregation, assimilation, internment, imperialism, and global capitalism. 

Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

HIST 398-03: Cold War in Latin America
TTH 11:30am-1:00pm
Tamara Feinstein
JRHH 135

This seminar will look at Latin America-centered scholarship that challenges the previously bi-polar (US/USSR) approach of Cold War history. This course will examine work by both new and established historians, tackling themes such as Cuban projections of power in Latin America and beyond; the establishment of Southern Cone networks of national security doctrine and mutual support; and the role of internal colonial legacies of inequality in Cold War-era conflicts. In addition to introducing students to this new historiography, we will also analyze select primary documents in class to help prepare students for their own primary source based research projects for the course.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor

HIST 398-04: Empire and International Development in Africa
MWF 1:50-2:50pm
Zachary Poppel
JRHH 242

Exploration of how ideas and practices of humanitarianism, foreign aid, and modernization change over time. Using the expansion and contraction of imperial control in 20th century Africa as a background, we’ll examine everything from massive dams to micro-finance in order to learn what powers and limits international development. Debate of origins and consequences of interventions and improvement schemes will draw from diverse case-studies of colonial and postcolonial projects in cities and rural communities throughout the continent. For example, the Cahora Bassa Dam in Mozambique, the TAZARA Railway in Tanzania and Zambia, German cotton schemes in colonial-era Togo, and high-yield seeds in Sierra Leone. 

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor

HIST 400: Colloquium: The “Other Europe”: History and Historiography of Eastern Europe
W 6:00-9:00pm
Maureen Healy
Miller 414

This reading course covers leading historiographical interpretations of Eastern European history in the 19th and 20th centuries. Territories include lands of the former Habsburg Empire, Poland, Czechlands, Hungary, Yugoslavia and the Balkans.

Prerequisites: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 

HIST 450: History Seminar
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Benjamin Westervelt
Miller 414

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: History 300; junior standing or consent of instructor.

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