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Spring Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2017

 

HIST 112-01: Making Modern Japan
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 12:40-1:40

History of Japan from the start of the Tokugawa shogunate to the end of the 20th century. Tokugawa ideology, political economy, urban culture; intellectual and social upheavals leading to the Meiji Restoration; the Japanese response to the West; repaid industrialization and its social consequences; problems of modernity and the emperor system; Japanese colonialism and militarism; the Pacific war; postwar developments in economy, culture, politics. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 121-01: Modern European History
David Galaty

MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 1648 to the present. The scientific revolution, Enlightenment, national political revolution, capitalism, industrial development, overseas imperial expansion. The formation of mass political and social institutions, avant-garde and popular culture, the Thirty Years’ War of the 20th century, bolshevism, fascism, the Cold War, and the revolutions of 1989.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits 

 

HIST 134-01: United States: Revolution to Empire
Kevin McKenna
TTh 1:50-3:20

Introduction to the United States. How the young American nation coped with major changes and adjustments in its first century. Emergence of political parties; wars with Indians and Mexico, and expansion into a continental nation; the lingering problem of slavery; the rise of industry and urbanization; immigration; the development of arts and letters into a new national culture.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 142-01: Modern Latin American History
Elliott Young
TTh 9:40-11:10

Confrontation with the complexity of modern Latin America through historical analysis of the roots of contemporary society, politics, and culture. Through traditional texts, novels, films, and lectures, exploration of the historical construction of modern Latin America. Themes of unity and diversity, continuity and change as framework for analyzing case studies of selected countries. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 198-01: Topics: History of the Jews in Islamic Lands
Sara Jay
TTh 9:40-11:10

This course is a survey of selected Jewish communities in the Muslim world, their social, cultural and intellectual history from the Rise of Islam to the Twentieth Century. We will explore the long history of inter-communal contact and relationships between the two communities as well as assess moments of strife and conflict. Topics will include: the prophet Muhammad and the Jews of Arabia, the legal status of religious minorities under Islam, the spread of rabbinic Judaism under the Abbasid caliphs, international trade and Jewish scholarship in Medieval Egypt, the flourishing of Jewish Civilization in Muslim Spain (al-Andalus); Sephardic migrations to and Ladino Culture in the Ottoman Empire; the rise and fall of Western Imperialism and its impact on the Jewish communities of North Africa and the Middle East.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 211-F1: Reform, Rebellion, and Revolution in Modern China
Susan Glosser
TTh 1:50-3:20

The commercial revolution of the 12th century and the cultural flowering and political structures of Ming and early Qing dynasties (1367 to 1800) that shaped China’s response to Western invasion. Major peasant rebellions, elite reforms, and political revolutions of the last 150 years including the Opium War, Taiping Rebellion, Hundred Days Reform, Boxer Rebellion, collapse of the Qing dynasty, Nationalist and Communist revolutions.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 216-F1: Ancient Greece
Gordon Kelly
TTh 1:50-3:20

An introduction to the history and civilization of Ancient Greece, from the early Archaic era in mid-8th-century BC to the death of Socrates in 399 BC. Topics includes constitutional changes from monarchy through oligarchy and tyranny to democracy, the development of the Greek polis, contacts with Near Eastern civilizations, hegemony and imperialism, social structure, trade, and colonization. Readings will focus on ancient historical writings in translation and will highlight the challenges in interpreting evidence from antiquity.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 226-F1: Twentieth-Century Germany
Maureen Healy
MWF 12:40-1:40

Origins and consequences of World War I; attempts to develop a republican government; Nazism; evolution of the two Germanies after 1945 and their reunification. Readings on relationship between individual and state, pressures for conformity, possibility of dissent.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 227-F1: Medieval Europe, 800 to 1400
Benjamin Westervelt
MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and cultural elements of European life during the period from about 800 to 1400. Emphasis on Christianity as a dominant aspect of public life; feudalism and other forms of economic and social life; developing conflicts between secular and ecclesiastical institutions; emergence of European nation-states; contacts with the non-European world; high medieval culture.

Prerequisites: None; HIST 120 recommended; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 239-F1: Constructing the American Landscape
Reiko Hillyer
MW 3:00-4:30

Political, social, economic, and aesthetic forces that have helped shape ordinary built environments: farms, fast-food restaurants, theme parks, sports stadiums, highways, prisons, public housing. Patterns of economic growth and decline, technological innovation, segregation, gentrification, capital migration and globalization, historic preservation, and changing ideologies about nature and the city.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 240-F1: Race and Ethnicity in the United States
Kevin McKenna
TTh 9:40-11:10

Investigation of the history of categories of race and ethnicity in the United States, primarily focused on the historical production of conceptions of racial and ethnic difference. Examines the origins, uses, and mutations of ideologies of race and ethnicity, as well as how these ideologies intersect with empire and nationalism, sexuality and gender, capitalism and labor relations, and scientific knowledge. Considers both chronological and thematic approaches. Examine scholarly work, visual culture, and memoir. Open to all students.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 297-F1: Topics: The Middle East in the Twentieth Century
Sara Jay
MW 3:00-4:30

Introduction to the practice and research methods of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship organized around themes or problems in history. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research. Assignments are organized around a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.

This course surveys the history of the Middle East since World War I. Much of the contemporary attention to the Middle East is framed as a series of inscrutable crises rooted in primordial religious or ethnic hatreds. In contrast, we will examine such crises- The Arab-Israeli Conflict, the  Lebanese Civil War, the Iranian Revolution, the Gulf War, the War in Iraq through the lens of history and specific analytical themes. The central analytical themes include: colonialism; orientalism; the formation of the regional nation-state system; the formation and political mobilization of new social classes; changing gender relations; the development of new forms of appropriation of economic surplus (oil, urban industry) in the new global economy; religion; the Middle East as an area of the Cold War; the development of Israel/Palestine; and new conceptions of identity associated with these developments (Arabism, local patriotism, Islamism). The geographical focus is on the mashriq - the eastern Arab world (Egypt, the Fertile Crescent, and the Arabian Peninsula), plus Turkey, Israel, and some references to North Africa.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

  

HIST 300-01: Historical Materials
Benjamin Westervelt
TTh 9:40-11:10

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required

 

HIST 311-01: History of Family, Gender, and Sexuality in China
Susan Glosser
TTh 11:30-1:00

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                                  Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 316-01: Popular Culture and Everyday Life in Japanese History
Andrew Bernstein
MW 3:00-4:30

Popular culture as the site of social change and social control in Japan from the 18th to the 20th century. Religion and folk beliefs, work and gender roles, theatre and music, tourism, consumerism, citizens’ movements, fashion, food, sports, sex, drugs, hygiene, and forms of mass media ranging from woodblock prints to modern comic books, film, television. Concepts as well as content of popular and mass culture.

Prerequisites: None; HIST 112 recommended, 4 semester credits                   Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 388-01: Crime and Punishment in the United States
Reiko Hillyer
F 1:00-4:00

The rise of the carceral state in the United States, including crime in different historical eras and the ways Americans have sought to deter, punish, and rehabilitate. Sub-topics include the changing role of the police; changing definitions of what constitutes a crime; the evolution of the prison system; the rise of convict labor; the political economy of the recent prison boom; the emergence of the victims’ rights and prisoners’ rights movements; the privatization of prisons; differences in treatment based on race, gender, and age. Course will take place in a nearby correctional facility.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                              Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

HIST 397-01: Topics: Gender, Sexuality and Colonialism 
Sara Jay
TTh 1:50-3:20

Advanced study in the research and writing of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship; exposure to major debates and controversies in the field that may include, but are not limited to, comparative study, historiography, or interdisciplinary methodology. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research. Assignments are organized around a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.

This course provides a thematic overview of the intellectual questions, methodological challenges, and historiographical interventions that arise when gender as a category of historical analysis is brought to bear on colonialism as a world-historical phenomenon. In addition to exploring the multiple and conflicting sources through which scholars have sought to reconstruct gendered colonial pasts, we will examine works that address the conceptual problems that emerge when scholars seek to historicize the relationship between gender, sexuality and colonialism as analytical categories. Specific topics that we will discuss are the civilizing mission, the subaltern subject, sexuality and intimate colonialism, racialized pathologies, citizenship, nation and feminism.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                              Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium
Reiko Hillyer
T 6:00-9:00

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits                                              Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

HIST 450-01: History Seminar
Elliott Young
T 6:00-9:00

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the America; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits                                           Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

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