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Fall Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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FALL 2018 

 

HIST 110-01: Early East Asian History
Susan Glosser 
MWF 12:40-1:40

Early histories of China and Japan from earliest origins to the 13th century. Prehistory; early cultural foundations; development of social, political, and economic institutions; art and literature. Readings from Asian texts in translation. The two cultures, covered as independent entities, compared to each other and to European patterns of development.

Prerequisites: None, 4 semester credits

 

HIST 120-01: Early European History
Ben Westervelt 

MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 800 to 1648. Role of Christianity in the formation of a dominant culture; feudalism and the development of conflicts between secular and religious life. Contacts with the non-European world, the Crusades, minority groups, popular and elite cultural expressions. Intellectual and cultural life of the High Middle Ages, secular challenges of the Renaissance, divisions of European culture owing to the rise of national monarchies and religious reformations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 135-01: United States: Empire to Superpower
Jane Hunter
MWF 8:00-9:00

The power of the United States in the world, from the Spanish-American War to Iraq. American economic growth and its consequences. The federal government and the people. Mass society and mass marketing. Changing political alignments, the policy elite, and “political will.” The welfare state, women’s and minority rights.
 
Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 141-01: Colonial Latin American History
Staff
TTh 9:40-11:10

History of Latin America from Native American contact cultures through the onset of independence movements in the early 19th century. Cultural confrontations, change, and Native American accommodation and strategies of evasion in dealing with the Hispanic colonial empire.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 223-F1: War and Society in Premodern Europe
Ben Westervelt
MWF 10:20-11:20

Social transformations in premodern Europe caused by organization for and conduct of war. Topics include the hoplite revolution, military professionalization in the Roman Empire, the monopoly on violence in the Middle Ages, technology and “total war” during the Hundred Years’ War, and the military revolution of the sixteenth century.

Prerequisites: None, HIST 120 recommended; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 261-F1: Global Environmental History
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to major historical shifts in the relationship(s) between humans and their environment from prehistoric times to the present. Focuses particularly on Asia, Europe, and North America and covers such topics as the invention of agriculture, shifting conceptions and portrayals of nature, the exchange of biota between continents, responses to natural disasters, the ecological impact of the industrial revolution, and the 20th-century environmental movement. Exploration of the social, cultural, and political dimensions of environmental historians and a wide range of primary sources, including literature, artwork, philosophical texts, government documents, newspaper articles, and scientific data.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

HIST 297-01: Repression & Rebellion in the 20th-Century Caribbean Basin
Staff
TTh 1:50-3:20

This course offers an overview of Central American and Caribbean history during the twentieth century, focusing on cycles of state repression and civil uprising. We will examine the historical and geopolitical factors that gave rise to dictatorships in the region, as well as responses by civil society as they played out across different contexts. Students will conduct primary and secondary research with an aim to historicizing present-day social movements.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

HIST 297-02: Building the Transatlantic World
David Galaty
MWF 9:10-10:10

Introduction to the practice and research methods of history. Reading and critical analysis of primary sources and scholarship organized around
themes or problems in history. Focus varies depending on areas of the instructor’s teaching and/or research. Assignments are organized around
a substantial final project and/or several smaller projects. May be taken twice with change of topic.


HIST 300-01: Historical Materials
Reiko Hillyer
TTh 9:40-11:10

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

HIST 323-01: Modern European Intellectual History
David Galaty
MWF 11:30-12:30

Approaches to the problem of ethical values in 19th- and 20th-century European thought, including Marxist, social Darwinist, Nietzschean, and
Freudian perspectives; existentialism; postmodernism. Readings in philosophical, literary, artistic works.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium - Disasters in History
Andrew Bernstein
MW 3:00-4:30

Earthquakes, floods, epidemics, famines: the list of disasters suffered and/or caused by humanity over the centuries is as diverse as it is long. Together we will examine how historians have employed methods ranging from the analysis of paintings to the interpretation of government statistics to make sense of these and other sorts of disasters. Whether we read about the invention of the seismograph, the famine that killed millions during Mao’s Great Leap Forward, or the devastation of New Orleans by Hurricane Katrina, we will continually assess the ways in which historians have tackled questions like the following: To what extent can we classify disasters as “natural” on the one hand and “human-made” on the other? What do disasters reveal about the values and power dynamics of the societies in
which they occur? Is it possible to use what we have learned about past disasters to prevent or mitigate future ones?

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required

HIST 450-01: History Seminar - Transnational East Asia
Susan Glosser
MW 3:00-4:30

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching
field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia. May be taken twice for credit. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

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