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Fall Course Offerings

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES. IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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FALL 2019 

 

HIST 110-01: Early East Asian History
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20

Early histories of China and Japan from earliest origins to the 13th century. Prehistory; early cultural foundations; development of social, political, and economic institutions; art and literature. Readings from Asian texts in translation. The two cultures, covered as independent entities, compared to each other and to European patterns of development.

Prerequisites: None, 4 semester credits

 

HIST 120-01: Early European History
Ben Westervelt 

MWF 9:10-10:10

Social, intellectual, political, and economic elements of European history, 800 to 1648. Role of Christianity in the formation of a dominant culture; feudalism and the development of conflicts between secular and religious life. Contacts with the non-European world, the Crusades, minority groups, popular and elite cultural expressions. Intellectual and cultural life of the High Middle Ages, secular challenges of the Renaissance, divisions of European culture owing to the rise of national monarchies and religious reformations.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 135-01: United States: Empire to Superpower
Reiko Hillyer
TTH 1:50-3:20

The power of the United States in the world, from the Spanish-American War to Iraq. American economic growth and its consequences. The federal government and the people. Mass society and mass marketing. Changing political alignments, the policy elite, and “political will.” The welfare state, women’s and minority rights.
 
Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 141-01: Colonial Latin American History
Elliott Young
TTH 9:40-11:10

History of Latin America from Native American contact cultures through the onset of independence movements in the early 19th century. Cultural confrontations, change, and Native American accommodation and strategies of evasion in dealing with the Hispanic colonial empire.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 222-F1: Britain in the Age of Revolution
David Campion
MWF 9:10-10:10

A history of Britain and its people from the Glorious Revolution to the end of the Napoleonic War. The end of absolutism and the rise of the constitutional monarchy; the Augustan Age: arts, letters, and religion; the Atlantic world and British overseas expansion; the Enlightenment and scientific revolution; the American Revolution and its aftermath; union with Scotland and Ireland and the creation of the British national identity; the revolution in France and the wars against Napoleon; the beginnings of the Industrial Revolution

Prerequisites: None. HIST 121 recommended; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore required.

 

HIST 230-01: Eastern Europe: Borderlands and Bloodlands
Mo Healy
MWF 11:30-12:30

Examines Eastern European history from the eighteenth through twentieth centuries: the “nationalities question” that emerged from within the Habsburg and Russian empires; multinational zones; wars; successor states of the interwar period; the Balkans and the Yugoslav dissolution of the 1990s; consideration of East Europeans’ membership in the EU. Students will learn to do primary and secondary source research and will conduct an original research project over the course of the semester

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore required.

HIST 231-F1: US Women’s History, 1600-1980
Reiko Hillyer
TTH 9:40-11:10

The diverse experiences of American women from the colonial era to the recent past. Changing ideologies from the colonial goodwife to the cult of true womanhood. Impact of Victorianism, sexuality and reproduction, the changing significance of women’s work. Origins of the women’s rights movement, battles and legacy of suffrage, history of 20th century feminism, competing ideologies and experiences of difference

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 243-F1: African American History
Nancy Gallman
MWF 12:40-1:40

A survey of African American history from emancipation to the present: the process of emancipation, Reconstruction, the rise of Jim Crow, the Harlem Renaissance, the Great Depression and the transformation of the rural South, the civil rights movement, black power and white backlash, the rise of the prison-industrial complex, and the development of hip-hop culture. An examination of art, film, and theater will supplement written primary and secondary sources.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


HIST 261-F1: Global Environmental History 
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 1:50-2:50

Introduction to major historical shifts in the relationship(s) between humans and their environment from prehistoric times to the present. Focuses particularly on Asia, Europe, and North America and covers such topics as the invention of agriculture, shifting conceptions and portrayals of nature, the exchange of biota between continents, responses to natural disasters, the ecological impact of the industrial revolution, and the 20th-century environmental movement. Exploration of the social, cultural, and political dimensions of environmental change through the work of environmental historians and a wide range of primary sources, including literature, artwork, philosophical tex

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 288-F1: China in the News
Susan Glosser
TTH 1:50-3:20

Rarely a day goes by in the realm of contemporary American news that does not find China center stage. Whether through accolades of its avant-garde architecture, Olympic gold medals, and booming economy or critiques of its environmental practices, “neocolonialist” relationship with Africa, or domestic human rights, China has garnered an important space in the American public imaginary. China is a rapidly rising world power in an international arena witnessing the increasing economic instability and declining economic hegemony of Western nations, and its engagement in the global realm matters. We are interested in looking at China in the news in two different ways. First, this course will think topically about China as news. What is happening today in China both domestically and internationally that is worthy of international coverage? What are the historical precedents for such events and processes? How does understanding both the historical record and contemporary cultural formations help us to comprehend the significance of their current manifestation? Second, this course will think theoretically about China in the news. How is China represented in American media sources? What are the contours, influences, and ramifications of these representations? How do historical precedent and contemporary culture affect these representations?

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

HIST 300-01: Historical Materials
Mo Healy
MW 3:00-4:30

Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing required; Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors


HIST 310-01: China in the World
Susan Glosser
TTH 11:30-1:00

The nature and extent of China’s contact with other countries, including the silk roads to Middle Asia in the first millennium B.C.E., Jesuits and the influx of Spanish-American silver in the sixteenth century, British tea and opium trade, and Chinese intellectual experiments with social Darwinism, anarchism, communism, and the nuclear family ideal. Primary sources showing foreign and Chinese perceptions of the content and significance of these exchanges.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

HIST 328-01: The British Empire
David Campion
MWF 11:30-12:30

The history of British overseas expansion from the early 17th century to the end of the 20th century. Theories of imperialism; Britain’s Atlantic trade network; the Victorian empire in war and peace; collaboration and resistance among colonized people; India under the British Raj; Africa and economic imperialism; the effects of empire on British society; the creation of the British Commonwealth; the rise of nationalism in India, Africa, and the Middle East; decolonization and postcolonial perspectives. Extensive readings from primary sources.

Prerequisites: HIST 121 recommended; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

HIST 345-01: Race and Nation in Latin America
Elliot Young
TTH 1:50-3:20

Social thought about race and nation in Latin America. The Iberian concept of pureza de sangre, development of criollo national consciousness, 20th-century indigenista movements. Linkages between national identities and constructions of race, particularly in the wake of revolutionary movements. Freyre (Brazil), Marti (Cuba), Vasconcelos (Mexico), and Sarmiento (Argentina).

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required. 

 

HIST 397-01: Cross-Cultural Law & Justice in Early America
Nancy Gallman
MW 3:00-4:30

This course provides a comparative study of law and legal pluralism in the early North American borderlands. From the sixteenth century through the early nineteenth century, Europeans, Native peoples, and peoples of African descent committed acts of violence throughout the borderlands. People trespassed on land, killed other people and livestock, and stole property–non-human and human. In the resolution of intercultural conflicts, European and Native systems of law clashed. When a Menominee named Achiganaga allegedly killed two French traders in 1682, or when a Georgian official shot a Chehaw prisoner during an alleged escape attempt in 1802, or when Spanish officials accused Lower Creeks Juan and Jorge Galphin of raiding plantations on the Florida-Georgia border and taking seven slaves, eleven horses, and ninety heads of cattle in 1793–whose law governed the outcome? How and under what authority did Europeans prosecute indigenous people for murder? How did Native law impose justice when Europeans killed indigenous people? How did free and enslaved African Americans exercise legal power in both European and Native legal regimes? In other words, how and why did people from different cultures make their understandings of law intelligible to one another in violent contests over land, trade, and freedom? To what extent did the history of cross-cultural law vary across empires? Finally, how did these plural legal orders change over time? In this seminar, we will explore these questions to uncover the nature of legal pluralism and the ways it shaped the multiple meanings of law, justice, sovereignty, empire, and slavery in early North America.

 

Drawing on a mix of primary and secondary sources, we will discuss competing ideologies and jurisdictional disputes in the constitution of law. We will also examine conceptual approaches to analyze how legal pluralism defined relations between Native peoples, African Americans, and settlers in early North America. Ultimately, we will consider how the legal complexity of the early modern era informs our understanding of the meanings of law and justice in the present day.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required. 

 

HIST 400-01: Reading Colloquium
Reiko Hillyer
W 6:00-9:00

Reading and critical analysis of major interpretive works. Organized around themes or problems; comparative study of historical works exemplifying different points of view, methodologies, subject matter. Focus varies depending on instructor’s teaching and research area.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

 

HIST 450-01: Seminar: 20th Century Britain and Empire
David Campion
TTH 9:40-11:10

Work with primary documents to research and write a major paper that interprets history. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Recent topics: the Americas; the United States and Asia; European intellectual history since 1945; women in American history; Indian policy on the Pacific slope; World War II, the participants’ perspectives; the British Raj; cultural nationalism in East Asia.

Prerequisites: HIST 300; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Senior standing required. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.

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