Minoring

It is recommended that students plan early (by the end of the sophomore year) for this minor to ensure that they can schedule the required courses and the electives of their choosing.

For complete information about minoring, see the online catalog.

A minimum of 24 semester credits, distributed as follows:  

  • GEND 200 Genders and Sexualities in U.S. Society
  • GEND 300 Gender and Aesthetic Expression
  • GEND 440 Feminist Theory
  • GEND 231 Genders and Sexualities in Global Perspective OR another approved alternative from the following courses:

HIST 231A U.S. Women’s History, 1600 to 1980
RELS 340
Gender in American Religious History
SOAN 261
Gender and Sexuality in Latin America
SOAN 266
Social Change in Latin America
SOAN 285
Culture and Power in the Middle East

Additional courses may count. Contact director for approval.

At least 16 credits applied to the minor cannot be used for another minor or major program. In addition, at least four of the courses for the minor must be taken at Lewis & Clark.

 

  • GEND 200: Genders and Sexualities in U.S. Society

    M/W/F 11:30 – 12:30

    A. Hibbard

    Interdisciplinary exploration of gender and sexuality in connection with race, class, and ethnicity in the United States. Investigation of social and cultural ideas about difference and equality in the past and present. Materials include literature, film, memoir, poetry, feminist philosophy, political tracts, and queer theory, as well as classic and recent scholarly work in history, sociology, economics, communication, psychology, and other fields. Topics may include mass media and consumer culture, work, law and social policy, family, political activism and social movements, sexuality and the body, public health, medical research, violence, and theories of privilege and oppression.

    GEND 231: Gender/Sexualities Global

    T/TH 8:00 – 9:30

    K. Cameron-Dominguez

    Gender as it has been socially, culturally, and historically constituted in different times and places. Theoretical developments in the anthropology of gender. Cross-cultural exploration using examples from a wide range of societies, past and present. The relationship between cultural definitions of gender and the social
    experience of women, men, and alternative gender roles, such as the Native American two-spirits, the hijra of India, and global perspectives on contemporary transgender experiences.

    GEND 345: Gender Studies Symposium Chair

    TBD

    K. Brodkin

    Student chairs perform substantive analytic work related to this interdisciplinary field of study, conducting extensive research to explore speakers, develop panels, identify important issues, and develop the program of events. Working closely with each other, the planning committee, and the faculty director, chairs also develop leadership and professional responsibilities. Preference given to minors in Gender Studies, but students with relevant coursework or other experience will be considered. Students are expected to commit to Fall and Spring in the same academic year.

    GEND 440: Feminist Theory

    T/TH 11:30 – 1:00

    K. Brodkin

    Philosophical and political analysis of issues in feminist theory. Discussion of recent theoretical work (e.g., Butler, Mitchell) in relation to past feminist thinking (e.g., Wollstonecraft, Gilman, de Beauvoir). A problem-oriented approach that
    explores feminist theorizing about such topics as sex, gender, race, power, oppression, identity, class, difference.

    Electives:

     

    ENG 334: Topics: Oscar Wilde

    M/W/F 9:10 – 10:10

    A. Hibbard

    Special Topics in Literature. Intensive study of a particular theme, genre, or movement. 

    FREN 330: Francophone Literature

    M/W 3:00 – 4:30

    P. Brand

    Major works by Francophone writers outside of France (Africa, Canada, Caribbean). Focus on sociocultural issues as expressed in literature. Class discussion, short papers, oral presentations, midterm, final.

    PSY 230: Infant and Child Development

    T/TH 1:50 – 3:20

    Staff

    Psychological development in domains including perception, cognition, language, personality, social behavior. How psychological processes evolve and change. Emphasis on infancy and childhood.

    PSY 260: Social Psychology

    M/W/F 12:40 – 1:40

    D. Leonard

    The effects of social and cognitive processes on the ways individuals perceive, influence, and relate to others. Person perception, the self, prejudice and stereotyping, social identity, attitudes and attitude change, conformity, interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, group processes, intergroup conflict.

    RHMS 406: Race Rhetoric & Resistance

    T/TH 9:40 – 11:10

    K. Chirindo

    Culturally patterned ways of dealing with misfortune, sickness, and death. Ideas of health and personhood, systems of diagnosis and explanation, techniques of healing ranging from treatment of physical symptoms to metaphysical approaches in non-Western and Western Traditions.

    SOAN 255: Medicine, Healing, and Culture

    M/W/F 3:00 – 4:30

    S. Bajracharya

    Culturally patterned ways of dealing with misfortune, sickness, and death. Ideas of health and personhood, systems of diagnosis and explanation, techniques of healing ranging from treatment of physical symptoms to metaphysical approaches in non-Western and Western Traditions.

    SOAN 285: Culture/Power in the Middle East

    T/TH 1:50 – 3:20

    O. Kosansky

    Introduction to the anthropology of the Middle East and North Africa, with an emphasis on the relationship between global and local forms of social hierarchy and cultural power. Topics include tribalism, ethnicity, colonialism, nationalism, gender, religious practices, migration, the politics of identity.

    SOAN 309: Labors of Love

    M/W/F 1:50 - 2:50

    Staff

    Exploration of the types of labor typically associated with love, sex, passion, and care-sex work, care work, political work, creative work, craft occupations, intellectual labor, and athletic labor across different historical and
    geographical contexts. Investigation of how and when work becomes associated with pleasure and/or becomes a source of frustration. Critical
    examination of contemporary discourses related to the value of work. Particular focus on how dynamics related to gender, class, sexuality, race, and colonialism shape our experiences of work: What does it mean to love our work? Should
    we love our jobs? Who gets to love their jobs? What are the consequences of loving our work?

    SPAN 440: Contemporary Historical Narrative in Mexico

    M/W/F 12:40 – 1:40

    M. Rabasa

    Study of a genre, a literary movement, or a topic in Hispanic literatures (peninsular and/or Latin American, or U.S. Latino). Extensive oral and written work culminating in a research paper written in Spanish. May be taken twice for credit with a change of topic.

    TH 106-01: Fundamentals of Movement

    M/W 11:30 - 1:00

    S. Davis

    Use of guided movement explorations, partner work, readings, and discussion to explore structural and functional aspects of the body and anatomy with the goal of increasing efficiency of movement and physical coordination. Use of imagery supports dynamic alignment, breath, mobility/stability, relaxation, and partner work including massage, with a main focus on the skeletal system and elements of muscle and organ systems, as well as the relationship between the body and psychological/emotional patterns. Extensive journal writing.

    TH 106-02: Fundamentals of Movement

    M/W 9:40 - 11:10

    S. Davis

    Use of guided movement explorations, partner work, readings, and discussion to explore structural and functional aspects of the body and anatomy with the goal of increasing efficiency of movement and physical coordination. Use of imagery supports dynamic alignment, breath, mobility/stability, relaxation, and partner work including massage, with a main focus on the skeletal system and elements of muscle and organ systems, as well as the relationship between the body and psychological/emotional patterns. Extensive journal writing.

    WLL 140-01: Fairy Tales Across Cultures

    M/W/F 10:20 - 11:20

    C. Sprecher Loverti

    In this course we will read fairy tales from a wide range of cultures and time periods. Works by cultural critics, psychoanalysts, historians and sociologists will help us understand the cultural and historical context of these tales’ production, as well as explain their enduring relevance. We will study how various artists have kept these tales alive by re-appropriating them for their own cultural contexts. We will look at traditional works of art from different cultures and historical periods, as well as examples from today’s popular culture. We will ask: What is the relevance of each tale and its re-writing for its particular cultural context and historical period? What aspects of the tales do the different renderings emphasize? Is there something about these tales that transcends the particular time and place in which they were created? And if so, what are they telling us about our common humanity?

The interdisciplinary minor in Gender Studies examines formations of racialized ideas of gender, explores constructions of sexuality, and analyzes variations in gender systems through historical perspectives as well as groundbreaking, emerging work. The minor provides students backgrounds in the tradition of gender analysis and feminism, offering them opportunities to engage with classics of the field.

Courses in Gender Studies analyze images and vocabularies of gender expression that shape cultural representations and explore how artistic production both conforms to and resists categories of gender and sexuality.

The college’s international curriculum and overseas study programs encourage students to examine the intersections of gender, race, class, and other axes of power and identity in a variety of cultures. Finally, the minor engages students in the political and philosophical exploration of strategies for transforming coercive and unequal gender systems, and extends to students an expanded range of imaginative resources for the development of self and society.