Fall Courses

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

 


 

FALL 2021

 

Scroll to the bottom to see how English department offerings count towards General Education requirements.

 

ENG 100-01: Films Adapting Fictions
Michael Mirabile
TTH 1:50-3:20

This course is designed to provide skills useful for the close reading and analysis of films and works of modern literature. Establishing parallels between literary and cinematic arts, we will reflect on the adaptation by film directors and screenwriters of works of fiction: the movement or transition from page to screen. We will also examine how models of criticism are shaped by formal features integral to the art of the cinema (cinematography, editing, performance, special effects, etc.). Among the recurring topics that we will address over the length of the semester are: genre, spectatorship, gender, narrative, spectacle, and identification. A central aim of the course is to specify the conventions of a variety of literary and cinematic genres: the thriller, crime fiction and film noir / neo-noir, the Gothic or horror story, science fiction, and meta-cinema or critical cinema (films about other films). Special emphasis will be placed on “free” or “distant” adaptations of works of fiction, on films that creatively rethink and reimagine the contents of the original source material—and rethink the very concept of “adaptation.” 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 200-F1/F2: Fiction Writing 1
Pauls Toutonghi
F1- MWF 10:25-11:25 / F2-MWF 11:30-12:30

The first in a sequence, this class studies the work of 25 contemporary fiction writers. These stories pair with weekly craft exercises, which consider story writing through the lens of scene structure, subtext in dialogue, and a variety of other viewpoints. By semester’s end, students write and revise a complete short story.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M 3:00-4:30, TH 3:30-5:00

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Karen Gross
TTH 9:40-11:10
                                                                                            

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
William Pritchard 
MWF 9:10-10:10                                                                                

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rishona Zimring 
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of literature in English. Romantic period to the present.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 209-F1: Introduction to American Literature
Kristin Fujie
MWF 11:30-12:30

Selective survey of American literature in English from the colonial period through the present. We will discuss the development of peculiarly American ideas, questions, genres, and styles, as well as the ways they have changed through time. We will also consider what it means to categorize literary works by nation in the first place; i.e., what is at stake in the concept of a national literary tradition.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 271-F1: Law and Literature
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 9:10-10:10

Students will bring legal cases and constructs to bear on their understanding of works of fiction while using literary interpretation methods and narrative theories to construe legal documents and trials. To what extent can we read spectacular trials as storytelling contests that pit one genre against another? How do some of the same theories of character and representation inform literary interpretation and legal doctrine? How does the literary device of the unreliable narrator illuminate the problem of testimonial injustice? What is the relationship between legal and poetic justice? Historical and thematic focus may vary.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 276-F1: Animals and Animal Rights In Literature
Kurt Fosso
MWF 12:40-1:40

Investigation of the literary history of animal being and rights, chiefly in English/Anglophone poetry and fiction circa 1770-2000 but extending back to Homer, Genesis, Aesop, Aristotle, Descartes, and other authors’ works prior to the outset of the animal-rights era and its key texts by Anna Barbauld, Robert Burns, Samuel Taylor Coleridge (esp. “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner”), William Wordsworth, Anna Sewell (in Black Beauty), and others. We’ll explore what such narratives reveal about the complexity and ethical perplexity of our relationships to nonhuman creatures, and the uncanny vistas they help us to glimpse. We’ll also read some relevant, fairly recent animal-rights theory and philosophy, and students will conduct some basic research.

This course also counts as an elective to the Environmental Studies major.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 300-01: Fiction Writing 2

Don Waters
MWF 12:40-1:40

The second in a sequence, this class shifts from the reading of contemporary fiction to the emulation of these models, and students’ creation of their own work. Some exercises and free-writes are assigned, but the bulk of the course is focused on generating short stories to be workshopped by the class. The readings focus on the process of writing itself and its psychology.

Prerequisites: ENG 200; 4 semester credits

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 301-01: Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
TTH 1:50-3:20 

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.

Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 303-01: Nonfiction Writing 2
Pauls Toutonghi
MWF 12:40-1:40

Conducted in a round-table form, with students producing about half of the work to be studied, this peer-review-centered course features sections of writing workshop and craft in which students will produce two short, original nonfiction pieces in memoir, or personal-essay form. Some familiarity with major nonfiction writers is assumed and these writers form the core of the touchstone texts as students move forward in the creative nonfiction writing sequence.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 309-01: Ancient Masterpieces and English Literature
Kurt Fosso
MWF 10:20-11:20

Study of stories from antiquity that have influenced countless generations of artists. Along with introducing students to some of the greatest ancient works ever written, this course will trace these works’ influences in English literature, both in early-modern translations (chiefly of Homer and the Bible) as well as in various literary adaptations and allusions, including several from the Romantic and Victorian eras. Students will grapple with awesome tales of gods, heroes, and monsters and in doing so gain, from this one course, a better understanding of both the Judeo-Christian and Greco-Roman traditions. Texts will include works from Homer, Sappho, the King James Bible, Horace, Virgil, and Ovid, as well as Shakespeare’s Venus and Adonis, Milton’s Samson Agonistes, Keats’s “Ode to a Nightingale,” and Tennyson’s “Ulysses.”

This course counts towards the Category I  major requirement. It also counts as an elective to the Classics major/minor.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 313-01: Satire & Sentiment, 1660-1780
William Pritchard
MWF 11:30-12:30

An introduction to British literature written in “the long 18th century.” Covers the full range of the period’s genres - plays, poems, essays, prose narratives - and includes many of the period’s major authors (George Etherege, John Bunyan, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Jonathan Swift, Anne Finch, Alexander Pope, Eliza Haywood, John Gay, Mary Wortley Montagu, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson, Oliver Goldsmith). Particular attention paid to the relation between satiric and sentimental depictions of human existence.

This course counts towards the Category I major requirement.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 316-01: Modern British and Irish Literature
Rishona Zimring
TTH 11:30-1:00

A survey of literary works that reimagine and expand the scope of the novel and short story, beginning with and emphasizing early-20th-century experiments with form and ending with consideration of recent and emerging new voices. Responses to crises and aftermaths of two world wars, major cultural changes, and global geopolitical shifts, producing fiction that gives voice to transition, instability, and possibility. Radical innovations by modernist writers such as James Joyce and Virginia Woolf; novels that pose challenging philosophical and social questions; writing that pushes boundaries, reinvents tradition, and envisions new horizons. While emphasis is on fiction, some poetry will be included as well. Authors may include Joyce, Woolf, E.M. Forster, Joseph Conrad, D.H. Lawrence, Katherine Mansfield, Elizabeth Bowen, Samuel Beckett.

This course counts towards the Category II major requirement.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 

 

ENG 334-02: Don DeLillo and Colson Whitehead
Michael Mirabile
TTH 9:40-11:10

This course will provide an opportunity to examine works of contemporary fiction. Don DeLillo and Colson Whitehead are major American novelists of the late twentieth century and early twenty-first century. Although the authors belong to different generations, the works of DeLillo and Whitehead overlap
chronologically and intersect thematically at several important points. A reading of a selected number of their novels and short stories will lead to discussions of postmodernism, African-American literary traditions, language experiments, mass media, popular culture, racial and ethnic identity, New York experiences, globalization, and the Cold War. The novels we will devote extended time to were written and published between the approximate years of 1980 and 2020. We will read these groundbreaking and influential fictions by DeLillo and Whitehead with a close attention to their complex construction as well as the transformative social and historical context in which they were produced.

This course counts towards the Category II major requirement.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

Eng 450-01: Frankenstein and the Shelleys
Kurt Fosso
MW 3:00 - 4:30pm
This seminar will focus upon Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley’s 1818 Gothic novel, Frankenstein. We’ll also examine other works written by Mary as well as by her partner, Percy Bysshe Shelley, during their turbulent life together from 1814, when they eloped, until his death at sea in 1822. We’ll read their personal History of a Six Weeks’ Tour and selected letters, Mary’s “incestuous” novella Mathilda, and a number of Percy’s poems, including Alastor and “Ozymandias,” along with his darkly gothic play The Cenci. We’ll also explore Frankenstein’s cultural legacies, from the novel’s early re-creation for the London stage to James Whale’s transformative 1931 film. Each seminar member will write a 20-25 page paper providing a substantiated and well-researched argument treating one or more of these texts of fiction, poetry, prose, and drama (and film). Near the semester’s end, students will deliver a portion of their findings in a formal class presentation.

Prerequisites: ENG 205, ENG 206, and two 300-level literature courses; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Senior standing required.

 

Eng 450-02: William Faulkner
Kristin Fujie
TTh 11:30am - 1:00pm
Interviewer: Some people say they can’t understand your writing, even after they read it two or three times. What approach would you suggest for them?

Faulkner: Read it four times. —The Paris Review, 1956

One of the most innovative and challenging writers of the twentieth century, William Faulkner has left us with a large body of work that holds rich rewards for courageous and patient readers. Of the nineteen novels that he wrote, we will study just a few, which I will select from the following major works: The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), Light in August (1931), and/or Absalom, Absalom! (1936). These texts were published within a seven-year period during which Faulkner developed the radical narrative techniques that enabled him to probe the volatile nexus of gender, race, class, and sexuality which lies at the heart of his most powerful writings. Depending on student interest, we might also incorporate some shorter pieces by Faulkner, or work by another author who is in dynamic conversation with Faulkner (e.g. Jesmyn Ward, Toni Morrison, James Baldwin). To all this we’ll add a selective sampling of criticism in order to get a sense of how Faulkner has been read, and why his writings have proven so generative for literary critics of all stamps. This will help to prepare you for your major creative task of the semester, which will be to write a 20~25 page paper that presents an original reading of one or more of the texts from the course, and also enters into dialogue with some thread of scholarly debate. Please contact me directly if you have any questions about the class! I would love to hear from you.

Prerequisites: ENG 205, ENG 206, and two 300-level literature courses; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Senior standing required.

 

Eng 450-03: Medieval Dream Visions
Karen Gross
M 3:00 - 4:30pm, TH 3:30 - 5:00pm
Oracular pronouncement from God? A liminal space between life and death? Or just a night of indigestion? Since antiquity, dreams have been attributed to various causes and freighted with meaning. Dreams also have long been linked to poetry, a space for the imagination to run unfettered, as Adam explains to Eve:

in the Soule
Are many lesser Faculties that serve
Reason as chief; among these Fansie next
Her office holds; of all external things,
Which the five watchful Senses represent,
She forms Imaginations, Aerie shapes,
Which Reason joyning or disjoyning, frames
All what we affirm or what deny, and call
Our knowledge or opinion; then retires
Into her private Cell when Nature rests.
Oft in her absence mimic Fansie wakes
To imitate her; but misjoyning shapes,
Wilde work produces oft, and most in dreams,
Ill matching words and deeds long past or late.
(Paradise Lost 5.100-13)

This seminar will explore the fruitful association of dreams and literature, focusing particularly on some of the most thrilling visions from medieval England as well as a few later responses to these works. Along the way, we’ll explore how authors have used the alternative space of dreams to explore problems difficult to tackle in the cold rationality of wakefulness, including the nature of fame, the healing of grief, the construction of a utopian society, and the boundary between the finite Creature and infinite Creator. We’ll also encounter some of the most haunting and evocative images ever conceived in English literature: bloody rain, temples of bronze and ice, a maiden of pearl, the hazelnut, and talking chickens. Possible readings include Chaucer’s House of Fame, Parliament of Fowls, and Nun’s-Priest’s Tale; the Gawain-Poet’s Pearl; Julian of Norwich’s Showings; the anonymous poems The Assembly of Ladies and The Flower and the Leaf (the latter an inspiration for Keats); William Morris’s News from Nowhere, and T. S. Eliot’s Four Quartets.

Prerequisites: ENG 205, ENG 206, and two 300-level literature courses; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Senior standing required. 

 

Please view the Senior Seminar tab on this website for ENG 450 registration information.

 

FALL 2021 OFFERINGS AND GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS

General Education Requirements — Catalogues prior to 2020-21

Creative Arts: ENG 200, ENG 201, ENG 300, ENG 301, ENG 303

General Education Requirements — 2020-21 Catalogue

BRW: ENG 276, ENG 316

Creative Arts: ENG 100, ENG 205, ENG 206, ENG 209, ENG 271, ENG 276, ENG 303,  ENG 309, ENG 313, ENG 316, ENG 334

Culture, Power, and Identity: ENG 271

Global Perspectives: ENG 316

Historical Perspectives: ENG 209, ENG 276, ENG 309, ENG 313, ENG 316