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English

Spring English Course Offerings

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2020

 

ENG 100-01: Topics in Literature
Will Pritchard 
MWF 10:20-11:20

Emphasis on a particular theme, genre, or movement in literature. Topic will be announced each time the course is offered. Recent topics have included literary representations of childhood, Gothic literature, experimental fiction, and films adapting fiction. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-02: Topics: Adventure!
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 10:20-11:20

How are adventure and storytelling related? This class surveys forms that adventure takes in literature and film, from boy’s adventure novels to travel journals, from Arthurian legend to detective stories, from road trips to action movies. Adventure heroes and heroines light out, court danger, and endure hardship in search of treasure, excitement, and self-knowledge. What do these texts suggest about adult stakes in childhood? How do they represent empire and the “other”? How do they imagine nature and construct “the wild”? Is the myth of male flight available to girls and women? What anxieties do adventure narratives express and what fantasies do they satisfy? Authors may include Meriwether Lewis, Isabella Bird, Lewis Carroll, Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Conrad, Jeanette Winterson, Marilynne Robinson, John Krakauer, Arthur Conan Doyle, Tomi Adeyemi, and others. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 105-01: Art of the Novel
Lyell Asher
MWF 9:10-10:10

Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Jerry Harp
T/Th 1:50-3:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Kurt Fosso
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to the present. 

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rachel Cole
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to the present. 

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits                                     

 

ENG 235-F1: Topics: Women and Film
Rishona Zimring
MWF 10:20-11:20

This class surveys key chapters in the history of women and film, through the analysis of films as texts and through a survey of written works examining the representation of women in film and their role in, or exclusion from, the film industry and independent film-making. Topics include stardom, actresses in genres such as screwball and melodrama, women directors, and women in world cinema. Readings include guides to film form, feminist film theory and criticism, historical scholarship, memoirs, and biographies. Class meetings will combine discussion, lecture, and film analysis, and students will write analytically and creatively in a series of commentaries and longer essays. All films must be viewed in full either at scheduled group screenings or individually in preparation for class discussion.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 235-F2: Topics: Radical Film
Michael Mirabile
MWF 12:40-1:40

Focused study of a particular theme, genre, or movement. Topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be taken twice for credit with different content; registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

  

ENG 301-01: Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M/TH 3-4:30/3:30-5

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.

Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

ENG 313-01: Satire & Sentiment, 1660-1780
Will Pritchard
MWF 12:40-1:40

An introduction to British literature written in “the long 18th century.” Covers the full range of
the period’s genres—plays, poems, essays, prose narratives—and includes many of the period’s major authors (George Etherege, John Bunyan, Aphra Behn, William Congreve, Joseph Addison, Richard Steele, Jonathan Swift, Anne Finch, Alexander Pope, Eliza Haywood, John Gay, Mary Wortley Montagu, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson, Oliver Goldsmith). Particular attention paid to the relation between satiric and sentimental depictions of human existence.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits 
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

ENG 332-01: Shakespeare: Later Works
Lyell Asher
MWF 1:50-2:50

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

ENG 333-01: Major Figures: Virginia Woolf
Rishona Zimring
MWF 10:20-11:20

Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Bront√ęs, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.  

  

ENG 334-01: American Crime and Suspense Fiction
Michael Mirabile
T/TH 9:40-11:10

This course will trace the development of American crime fiction in the twentieth century, through its “hardboiled” or noir, modernist, pulp, and postmodernist phases. A key point of focus will be on how crime fiction rapidly expands during this period to encompass and generate multiple traditions, genres, and subgenres, whether in the form of detective stories, murder mysteries (or “whodunits”), thrillers or suspense narratives, or espionage thrillers. Significantly, most of these story types have equivalents or near equivalents in film (specifically, in Hollywood cinema), such as in film noir, neo-noir, and thriller genres. Examining relevant works (and, at times, their adaptations), we will reflect on stylistic and aesthetic
questions as well as on their wider implications, on how they engage with issues surrounding the representation of race, gender, social class, and the city or metropolis. Authors will include some of the following: Dashiell Hammett, Patricia Highsmith, James M. Cain, Raymond Chandler, Chester Himes, Vera
Caspary, Jim Thompson, Susanna Moore, Gillian Flynn, Walter Mosley, and Paul Auster.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

ENG 334-02: Special Topics in Literature
Lyell Asher
MWF 11:30-12:30

Intensive study of a particular theme, genre, or movement. Topic will be announced each time the course is offered. May be taken twice for credit with different content; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

 

ENG 340-01: How To Do Things With Meaning: Structuralist and Poststructuralist Literary Theory and Criticism
Kurt Fosso
T/TH 11:30-1:00

A general introduction to the major movements in “theory” since the 1960s: structuralism, post-structuralism (including deconstruction and French feminisms), new historicism, and cultural studies. Along the way we’ll consider an issue fundamental to literary theory, to our reading, and to most every teacher’s approaches to interpretation: the production of “meaning” in texts and its relation to structure, power, ethics, and pleasure.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.


 

ENG 400-01: Fiction Writing 3
Don Waters
MWF 10:20-11:20

Third in a series, this class is primarily a writing workshop. It emphasizes secondary readings that consider life as a writer after graduation, including the world of publishing, MFA programs, agents, and internships. Students complete a long project (a suite of short stories; a novella; and, potentially, the beginning of a novel). Small class size emphasizes individualized instruction.

Prerequisites: ENG 200 & 300; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing required.


ENG 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
M/TH 3-4:30/3:30-5

An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.


Prerequisites: ENG 301; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Senior standing required.