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Spring English Course Offerings

isit the Registrar’s webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2019

 

ENG 100-01: Experimental Fictions
Kristin Fujie 
T/TH 9:40-11:10

This course focuses mostly on British and American post-1900fiction that employs innovative formal techniques. By studyinghow writers use devices such as frame narratives, unreliable andnon-traditional narrators, non-linear plot, andstream-of-consciousness style, we explore how literature can
bend, stretch, break, and otherwise manipulate linguistic and narrative conventions in order to create new experiences for its readers. Along the way we will construct a “tool kit” of literary terms and concepts that will enable you to analyze fiction with greater precision and, I hope, with greater
pleasure! Syllabus typically includes works by Conrad, Woolf, Faulkner, Hurston, McEwan, and Morrison.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-02: Writing, Illness, and Medicine
Rishona Zimring
MWF 12:40-1:40

How do writers find words to articulate perceptions and experiences of illness, diagnosis, treatment, convalescence, loss, grief, consolation? Literary forms and language such as storytelling, description, detection, reminiscence, metaphor, and elegy give illuminating expression and meaning to private experiences of physical, emotional, and intellectual encounters with illness. Such expressions often resist social conventions and seek to redefine and reimagine suffering beyond existing scientific and religious systems. We will read fiction, poetry, and non-fiction to explore varied perspectives, including writing by medical practitioners and researchers, as well as by and about authors such as John Keats, Virginia Woolf, Katherine Mansfield, and Claudia Rankine. In addition to writing short commentaries on the readings, students will experiment with literary forms and language, including non-fiction genres such as memoir.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 105-01: The Art of the Novel
Lyell Asher
MWF 11:30-12:30

Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Jerry Harp
T/Th 1:50-3:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rachel Cole
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to the present. 

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Kurt Fosso
T/Th 9:40-11:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to the present. 

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 208-01: Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction
Don Waters
MWF 12:40-1:40

Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits                                           Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

ENG 243-F1: Women Writers
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 11:30-12:30

Varies according to instructor. May focus on the common themes and patterns of influence in British, American, or international literature by women, or on close scrutiny of two or more authors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

ENG 235-F1: Animal Rights in Literature
Kurt Fosso
TTH 1:50-3:20

Investigation of animal being and rights in English/Anglophone poetry and fiction circa 1700-2000, including S. T. Coleridge’s The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, Anna Sewell’s Black Beauty, and J. M. Coetzee’s Lives Of Animals (with some relevant recent theory, too). We’ll explore what these and other key narratives reveal about the complexity and ethical perplexity of our
relationships to non-human creatures, and the challenging, uncanny vistas to which such depictions of animals and animal rights may lead.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

ENG 300-01: Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi
T/TH 9:40-11:10

Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors’ texts. Daily exercises in
various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers’ work and participate in oral critique.

Prerequisites: ENG 200; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 301-01: Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M/TH 3-4:30

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.

Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 311-01: Literature of English Renaissance
Lyell Asher
MWF 9:10-10:10

Developments in poetry, fiction, and drama during the Elizabethan period and the 17th century. Genres such as the sonnet and sonnet sequences, the pastoral, heroic and Ovidian verse, satire; examples from non Shakespearean dramatists, comedy, tragedy. May include Browne, Donne,
Herbert, Jonson, Marlowe, Marvell, Milton, Raleigh, Sidney, Spenser, Surrey, Wyatt.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 326-01: African American Literature
Kristin Fujie
T/TH 1:50-3:20

In this class, we will study the African American literary tradition from slavery through the present. Topics will include the particularity and plurality of the African American experience; black authors’ participation in and departures
from the broader tradition of American literature; and discussion of what it means to define oneself and one’s community, other people and their communities, or a literary tradition with reference to race. Authors may include Wheatley, Douglass, Jacobs, Sejour, Washington, Du Bois, Chesnutt, Hughes, Bennett, Toomer, Larsen, Ellison, Baldwin, Wright, Brooks, Giovanni, Baraka, Lorde, Morrison, Butler, Cole, Dove, Trethewey, Smith.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 

 

ENG 330-01: Chaucer
Karen Gross
MWF 11:30-12:30

The poetry of Chaucer in its literary, historical, social, and religious contexts. Topics may include the relationship between the sacred and the profane, the representations of men and women in 14th-century English society, the rise of the vernacular in the later Middle Ages, medieval attitudes towards poetry and authorship, the influence of continental European literary forms on English traditions, manuscript culture and ways of reading and writing before the advent of printing, the characteristics of different medieval literary genres, and the critical reception of Chaucer. Readings, predominantly from The Canterbury Tales, are in Middle English.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


 

ENG 332-01: Shakespeare: Later Works
Lyell Asher
MWF 1:50-2:50

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for MeasureKing LearMacbethCoriolanusAntony and CleopatraThe Winter’s TaleThe Tempest.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 333-01: Major Figures - James Joyce
Rishona Zimring
MWF 10:20-11:20

In “Major Figures: James Joyce,” we will spend a semester immersing ourselves in three works by this legendary 20th-century author: Dubliners, A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, and-most of all-Ulysses. We will also sample works about Ulysses such as Kevin Birmingham’s recent history of its censorship and publication, The Most Dangerous Book, and the Irish writer Edna O’Brien’s inspired and textually experimental biography of Joyce. We will explore how Joyce re-invented the epic and the novel,
injected the interaction of reading and writing with new life, and re-imagined the self as a work of textual art, both playfully and profoundly.


Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
 

ENG 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
M/TH 3:00-4:30/3:30-5

An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.

Prerequisite: ENG 301; 4 semester credits                                                   Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.