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What You Can Do Here

What in the world do you want to do with your life?

At Lewis & Clark, students are doing a lot—and they go on to do a lot more. Virtually any combination of coursework is possible, including majors and minors in the natural sciences, social sciences, or arts and humanities, as well as student-designed majors.

Students at Lewis & Clark also have numerous opportunities to collaborate with faculty members on research, to participate in internships on and off campus, to volunteer for community service projects, and to gain meaningful experience in many forums besides the classroom.

Renaissance Scholars

studentsAs a child, Scott Henderson spent countless hours squinting through binoculars at the stars. As a physics major and astronomy researcher at Lewis & Clark, he has enjoyed a substantial upgrade in equipment and a vastly magnified view of the cosmos. Meet Scott Henderson.

Tamma Carleton is studying in Chile this semester. “Experiencing the culture and taking classes in globalization and economic history at Universidad Católica de Valpara’so are giving me a firsthand look at how the theories behind economic development play out for the people here,” she says. Meet Tamma Carleton.

“I didn’t go to a conservatory, because I want to do more than play trombone in a symphony,” says Jonah Geil- Neufeld, a first-year student and accomplished musician from Chicago. “I want to do something for the good of humanity, and I’m trying to figure out how music plays into that.” Meet Jonah Geil-Neufeld.

When it comes to climate change, says David Norse, a senior majoring in religious studies, “what I’m most concerned about is how it’s going to affect the people who are the most vulnerable and who have the least power to change the situation. They’re basically paying for the sins of the Western world. And that, on many, many levels, bothers me.” Meet David Norse.

Charlie Morgan spent his summer in Oaxaca, Mexico, with village leaders to reintroduce the native amaranth, an extremely nutritious grain, into the local diet. Meet Charlie Morgan.

Accessing Information

library1Exploring the expanding universe of information begins for Lewis & Clark students at the Watzek Library, where information resources range from rare printed material to electronic resources. Through the Summit catalog, students can search the 28 million items in the collections at 36 academic libraries in the Pacific Northwest and receive materials directly from these institutions within 48 hours.

Group study rooms, wired study tables, wireless network access, and even a fireplace in the periodicals reading room make the library an ideal place to spend time tracking information resources. “In our increasingly digital era, the Watzek Library offers a place to explore cyberspace,” says library director Jim Kopp, “but it also provides a place to study, read a book, and seek assistance and support from knowledgeable staff members.”

Connections

Facilitating communication and learning and supporting your connections to people and information, technology is part of the fabric of Lewis & Clark. With ready access to computing labs (many available round-the-clock), high-speed network connections in the residence halls, a growing wireless network, e-mail, voice mail, and other applications, you will have easy access to faculty, staff, fellow students, and friends around the world.

Where Are They Now?

capstoneWhat can you do with a solid foundation in the liberal arts and sciences? The answers are as varied as the individuals. Here’s a sample of what members of a recent graduating class are doing today:

  • Graduate student in global management, Thunderbird School of Global Management, Arizona (international affairs major, art minor)
  • Software administrator, Cougar Biotechnology, Los Angeles (computer science and mathematics major)
  • English teacher, JET program, Japan (East Asian studies major, Chinese minor)
  • Lead generator, Advanced Alternative Energy Solutions, Bodega, California (biology major)
  • Graduate student in engineering, Columbia University, New York (physics major)
    Peace Corps volunteer, Kazakhstan (history and foreign languages double major)
  • Graduate student in social work, University of Michigan (psychology and Hispanic studies double major)
  • Client manager, Alinga Consulting Group, Moscow, Russia (international affairs and foreign languages double major)
  • Derivatives trade support analyst, Morgan Stanley, Singapore (communication major)
  • Graduate student in dentistry, Oregon Health & Science University (chemistry major)
    Outdoor science instructor, Oregon Museum of Science and Industry, Portland (physics major)
  • Owner, Brulé Illustration and Design, Vashon Island, Washington (studio art major)
  • Special education teacher, Teach For America, Honolulu (international affairs major)
  • Peace Corps volunteer, Namibia (mathematics major)
  • Medical student, Harvard Medical School (sociology and anthropology major)

Music to Her Ears

“I wish I’d had the opportunity to be a music student here,” laments Nora Beck, associate professor of music. “Lewis & Clark is a wonderfully free and open place to learn. The personal attention students get from the faculty is unlike anything I experienced in college. And Portland is a great place for a music student. The downtown area is small enough for comfort, but big enough to have a very good symphony, opera, and art museum. And the jazz scene is outstanding.”

She may have missed out on the student experience herself, but she’s been making sure that her students don’t miss a thing. “I want to help them develop confidence in their own imaginations,” she says. That’s the reason behind some of the imaginative exercises students experience in her class—such as the day she instructed students to bring a camera to class so they could photograph visual rhythms. That assignment became the seed for a junior recital by Amy Williams, Junction City, Oregon, who combined moonlight photographs with a performance of the Moonlight Sonata. “Amy took these ideas to a wonderful place,” says Beck. “It was very imaginative.”

“Students have so many opportunities here,” says Beck. “They can do a 14-week London program that’s packed with concerts and lectures. They can study virtually any instrument, including the Japanese koto or African marimba. They can learn new composing and recording techniques and cut their own CDs in our electronic studio. The diversity and richness of the curriculum are amazing.”

“I wish I’d had the opportunity to be a music student here,” laments Nora Beck, associate professor of music. “Lewis & Clark is a wonderfully free and open place to learn. The personal attention students get from the faculty is unlike anything I experienced in college. And Portland is a great place for a music student. The downtown area is small enough for comfort, but big enough to have a very good symphony, opera, and art museum. And the jazz scene is outstanding.”
She may have missed out on the student experience herself, but she’s been making sure that her students don’t miss a thing. “I want to help them develop confidence in their own imaginations,” she says. That’s the reason behind some of the imaginative exercises students experience in her class—such as the day she instructed students to bring a camera to class so they could photograph visual rhythms. That assignment became the seed for a junior recital by Amy Williams, Junction City, Oregon, who combined moonlight photographs with a performance of the Moonlight Sonata. “Amy took these ideas to a wonderful place,” says Beck. “It was very imaginative.”
“Students have so many opportunities here,” says Beck. “They can do a 14-week London program that’s packed with concerts and lectures. They can study virtually any instrument, including the Japanese koto or African marimba. They can learn new composing and recording techniques and cut their own CDs in our electronic studio. The diversity and richness of the curriculum are amazing.” 

Senior Capstone

science1The academic career of many Lewis & Clark students culminates in a senior capstone experience. Project topics are as varied as the individuals, and for some the capstone is a springboard to their first job. Take a look at what some members from the class of 2009 explored:

  • “People of Change: Examining a Loss of Cultural Practices in Native American People Through Salmon” (environmental studies major)
  • “Counting Sheep: The English Crown’s Influence on the 14th-Century Wool Trade” (economics major)
  • “Investigation of the Role of Rps3 in Yeast Ribosome Biogenesis” (biochemistry and molecular biology major)
  • “An Analysis of J.J.C. Smart’s Denial of the Necessity of Identity or, Whoever Smelt It Dealt It” (philosophy major)
  • “Media Diversity: The American Mass Media Melting Pot” (communication major)
  • “Coming Unhinged,” “Confidences,” “In Case of Fire,” graphite drawings on paper (art major)
  • “The Electrochemical Effects of Gold Nanoparticles on Thin Films of Molybdenum Trioxide” (chemistry major)
  • “The Work of a Few Farmers: The Failure of the Willamette Greenway and the Divide Between Environmentalists and Laborers” (history major)
  • “Giving Voice to the Voiceless: Community Radio in Portland and India” (sociology and anthropology major)
  • “Rapid Water Washes Dirty Sand: Individuals and Interdependence in China’s WTO Accession” (international affairs major)
She may have missed out on the student experience herself, but she’s been making sure that her students don’t miss a thing. “I want to help them develop confidence in their own imaginations,” she says. That’s the reason behind some of the imaginative exercises students experience in her class—such as the day she instructed students to bring a camera to class so they could photograph visual rhythms. That assignment became the seed for a junior recital by Amy Williams, Junction City, Oregon, who combined moonlight photographs with a performance of the Moonlight Sonata. “Amy took these ideas to a wonderful place,” says Beck. “It was very imaginative.”
“Students have so many opportunities here,” says Beck. “They can do a 14-week London program that’s packed with concerts and lectures. They can study virtually any instrument, including the Japanese koto or African marimba. They can learn new composing and recording techniques and cut their own CDs in our electronic studio. The diversity and richness of the curriculum are amazing.” 

Senior Capstone

science1The academic career of many Lewis & Clark students culminates in a senior capstone experience. Project topics are as varied as the individuals, and for some the capstone is a springboard to their first job. Take a look at what some members from the class of 2009 explored:

  • “People of Change: Examining a Loss of Cultural Practices in Native American People Through Salmon” (environmental studies major)
  • “Counting Sheep: The English Crown’s Influence on the 14th-Century Wool Trade” (economics major)
  • “Investigation of the Role of Rps3 in Yeast Ribosome Biogenesis” (biochemistry and molecular biology major)
  • “An Analysis of J.J.C. Smart’s Denial of the Necessity of Identity or, Whoever Smelt It Dealt It” (philosophy major)
  • “Media Diversity: The American Mass Media Melting Pot” (communication major)
  • “Coming Unhinged,” “Confidences,” “In Case of Fire,” graphite drawings on paper (art major)
  • “The Electrochemical Effects of Gold Nanoparticles on Thin Films of Molybdenum Trioxide” (chemistry major)
  • “The Work of a Few Farmers: The Failure of the Willamette Greenway and the Divide Between Environmentalists and Laborers” (history major)
  • “Giving Voice to the Voiceless: Community Radio in Portland and India” (sociology and anthropology major)
  • “Rapid Water Washes Dirty Sand: Individuals and Interdependence in China’s WTO Accession” (international affairs major)