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Seattle Event: “Mount Fuji: Physical and Imagined. Crossing the Science/Humanities Divide to Study a Celebrity Volcano”

Date: 6:00pm PDT April 1 Location: Seattle Marriott Waterfront 2100 Alaskan Way Seattle, WA 98121

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Seattle Marriott Waterfront 2100 Alaskan Way Seattle, WA 98121

Meet local alumni, parents, and admitted students, and spend the evening with two of L&C’s outstanding professors - Director of Environmental Studies Program and Associate Professor of Geological Science Liz Safran and Associate Professor of History Andy Bernstein. Enjoy a reception with hors d’oeuvres and drinks, and a talk about Mount Fuji.

Tuesday, April 1, 6 p.m.

Reception and presentation
Seattle Marriott Waterfront
2100 Alaskan Way
Seattle, WA 98121

Liz Safran and Andy Bernstein on “Mount Fuji: Physical and Imagined. Crossing the Science/Humanities Divide to Study a Celebrity Volcano.”

Event Registration

The cost of the event is $10, which includes hors d’oeuvres and drinks. Please click here to register. Call our office main line at 503.768.7950 if you encounter any problems with the online registration or have any questions.

Parking
Valet parking is available at the hotel for $20 per car for event guests. Bell Street Pier Garage Parking offers evening parking for $7 and is approximately one block away between Elliott Avenue and Wall Street.

More on the Speakers
imageProfessor Safran is a geomorphologist — a geologist who worries about how landscapes evolve.She completed her graduate and post-doctoral work at the University of Washington, University of California (UC), Santa Barbara and UC Santa Cruz.  She was first drawn into geology through a class taught by Stephen Jay Gould, with the modest title of “The History of Earth and of Life.”  “Once I learned that field trips and camping were required elements of the geology major, I was hooked.” She has been at Lewis & Clark College since 2000.  “For me, this is a wonderful professional setting, where I get to interact with intellects from vastly different fields and with inquisitive, gung-ho students.”

 

imageProfessor Bernstein is currently writing Fuji: A Mountain in the Making, a comprehensive “biography” of Mt. Fuji that treats the volcano as an actor in, and product of, both the physical world and the human imagination. “The dissonance between physical and imagined can be striking. Fuji is often portrayed as stable, peaceful, and even timeless, but it is a relatively young volcano that has erupted many times in the not-too-distant past (most recently in 1707) and will probably do so again. It is one of Japan’s most powerful symbols of national unity, yet competition over its economic benefits has generated centuries of conflict among people living at its base. Finally, it is an awe-inspiring example of nature’s beauty, but its upper reaches are heavily trafficked and thus environmentally degraded; the lower slopes are even home to military target ranges. My goal is not merely to point out these incongruities, but to examine how Fuji as physical and Fuji as imagined shaped one another amid shifting material, social, and ideological circumstances.”

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