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English

Spring English Course Offerings

Visit the Registrar’s webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2018

 

ENG 100-01: Topics in Literature: 
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 10:20-11:20

Emphasis on a particular theme or subgenre in literature to be chosen by the professor. Recent topics have included heroines in British fiction,
literature and the environment, love and the novel, history of the lyric poem, and literature of immigration. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.


Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-02: Topics in Literature: 
William Pritchard
MWF 10:20-11:20

Emphasis on a particular theme or subgenre in literature to be chosen by the professor. Recent topics have included heroines in British fiction,
literature and the environment, love and the novel, history of the lyric poem, and literature of immigration. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-03: Topics in Literature: 
Kristin Fujie
MWF 11:30-12:30

Emphasis on a particular theme or subgenre in literature to be chosen by the professor. Recent topics have included heroines in British fiction,
literature and the environment, love and the novel, history of the lyric poem, and literature of immigration. May be taken twice for credit with change of topic.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 105-01: The Art of the Novel
Lyell Asher

MWF 9:10-10:10

Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the
particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic
concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 200-F1: Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing
Donald Waters
MWF 11:30-12:30

Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student’s understanding
of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment.
  
Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M/TH 3:00-4:30/3:30-5:00

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Karen Gross
TTh 9:40-11:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rachel Cole
MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Kurt Fosso
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 208-01: Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction
Pauls Toutonghi
TTh 9:40-11:10

Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits                                           Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

ENG 279-01: Classical Backgrounds
Kurt Fosso
MWF 12:40-1:40

A study of epic, drama, and poetry from the Greek and Latin classics. Writers may include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Horace, Ovid.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

ENG 298-01: Literature and History of 20th-Century Britain
Rishona Zimring and David Campion
TTh 9:40-11:10

The literature and history of Britain throughout the 20th century. Literary study may focus on, but is not limited to, the Bloomsbury Group, the War Poets (World War I), Evelyn Waugh, George Orwell, Philip Larkin, Salman Rushdie, Alice Oswald, Ian McEwan, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Angela Carter, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. Historical topics will include the First World War; interwar politics, society, and class dynamics; British involvement in the Spanish Civil War; British society in the Second World War; building the welfare state; postwar decolonization and immigration; popular culture in the 1960s and ’70s; Thatcherism; and multicultural British society going into the 21st century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 310-10: Medieval Literature
Karen Gross
TTh 11:30-1:00

Study of the literature and culture of the European Middle Ages, with an emphasis on England. Topics vary, but may include romance and epic; travel, including for trade, pilgrimage, and crusade; saints, devotional life, and mysticism; Jewish/Christian/Muslim interactions; human/animal relations; chivalry and humanism; autobiography and the self; the political,
social, and religious contexts that affected the emergence of English as a literary language. English readings may include “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” “Pearl,” William Langland’s “Piers Plowman,” Margery Kempe’s “Book,” Julian of Norwich’s “Revelations,” the “Cloud of Unknowing,” “St. Erkenwald,” “Sir Orfeo,” “Mandeville’s Travels,” the “Croxton Play of the
Sacrament,” and the poetry of Robert Henryson, as well as poems and plays by anonymous writers in Old and Middle English. Readings will be in the original and translation.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 318-01: Modern Poetry
Jerry Harp
TTh 1:50-3:20

Significant modern British and American figures and more recent poets. May include Owen, Auden, Kavanagh, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Bishop, Roethke, Plath, Levertov.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 322-01: Post-Civil War American Literature
Kristin Fujie
MWF 1:50-2:50

American literature as it reflects cultural and historical events such as reconstruction, industrialization, Western expansion, the women’s rights movement. Aesthetic issues such as the rise of realism and naturalism. Cather, Chesnutt, Chopin, Crane, Douglass, Dreiser, DuBois, James, Jewett, Melville, Norris, Twain, Wharton.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 332-01: Shakespeare: Later Works
Lyell Asher
MWF 1:50-2:50

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for MeasureKing LearMacbethCoriolanusAntony and CleopatraThe Winter’s TaleThe Tempest.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 333-01: Major Figures
Rachel Cole
MWF 9:10-10:10

Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Brontes, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


 

ENG 333-02: Major Figures
Kurt Fosso
MW 3:00-4:30

Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Brontes, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


  

ENG 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
MW 3:00-4:30

An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.

Prerequisite: ENG 301; 4 semester credits                                                   Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 402-01: Advanced Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi
TTh 11:30-1:00

Students complete a long project (a collection of short stories, a novella or the beginning of a novel, or some combination thereof). Workshop format plus additional reading as needed.

Prerequisite: ENG 200 and ENG 300, 4 semester credits                             Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.