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Spring English Course Offerings

isit the Registrar’s webpage or WebAdvisor for additional information

PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

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SPRING 2018

 

ENG 100-01: Literary Representations of Childhood
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 10:20-11:20

This course traces the development of Anglo-American literary conceptions of the child from William Blake to the present. We will consider how and why so many important Romantic poets idealized childhood. We will explore the significance of Victorian fictional and non-fictional writings about exploited child workers, lonely orphans, and dying invalids. How did Victorian authors use these children to challenge the social and economic status quo and to satisfy the sentimental tastes of adult readers? We will also examine popular child heroes of adventure narratives, ghost stories, and fairytales. What is the allure of texts that figure the child as the uncivilized or wild “other”? How did these fictions both teach and transgress gender roles? The semester will end with a selection of recent works that seek to express the perspective of children caught in the crossfire of adult struggles over race, religion, and land. 



Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-02: Gothic Literature
William Pritchard
MWF 10:20-11:20

Gothic literature is the literature of the dark side. It is preoccupied, in the words of one scholar, with “supernatural and natural forces, imaginative excesses and delusions, religious and human evil, social transgression, mental disintegration and spiritual corruption.” The features (or clichés) of Gothic literature are familiar to us, but they remain surprisingly effective: haunted castles, graveyards, ruins, enclosed spaces, ghosts, vampires, doppelgängers, corpses, skeletons, etc. The author of the first gothic novel effectively summarized the genre when he described his narrative as one in which terror was the story’s “principal engine, prevent[ing] the story from ever languishing.”This course will provide a selective introduction to Gothic literature, presenting a range of terror-driven works (novels, stories and films) from the eighteenth century to the present.

Tentative list of texts: Horace Walpole, The Castle of Otranto; Mary Shelley, Frankenstein;stories by Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Wililam Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor; Robert Louis Stevenson, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde; Oscar Wilde, The Picture of Dorian Gray; Bram Stoker, Dracula; Henry James, The Turn of the Screw; Rebecca (dir. Alfred Hitchcock), Rosemary’s Baby (dir. Roman Polanski), Toni Morrison, Beloved and Jennifer Egan, The Keep.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 100-03: Experimental Fictions
Kristin Fujie
MWF 11:30-12:30

In this course we will immerse ourselves in works of British and American post-1900 fiction that employ innovative formal techniques. By studying our writers’ use of devices such as frame narratives, unreliable and non-traditional narrators, stream-of-consciousness style, non-linear plot, and pastiche, we will explore how literature can bend, stretch, break, and otherwise manipulate linguistic and narrative conventions in order to create new experiences for its readers. Along the way we will construct a “tool kit” of literary terms and concepts that will enable you to analyze fiction with greater precision and, I hope, with greater pleasure. Writers may include Joseph Conrad, Virginia Woolf, William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, Thomas Pynchon, John Barth, Toni Morrison, Ian McEwan, and David Mitchell. Please note that this is not a creative writing course.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 105-01: The Art of the Novel
Lyell Asher

MWF 9:10-10:10

Major works in English, American, and European fiction, from the 17th century to the present. Goals include increasing awareness of the
particular kinds of knowledge and perception that the novel makes available; considering the variety of ways in which novels braid moral and aesthetic
concerns; understanding how novels respond both to everyday human experience and to previous literary history; and heightening appreciation for the range of pleasures that the novel can afford. Writers may include Cervantes, Sterne, Austen, Flaubert, Kafka, Woolf, Nabokov, Kundera, Pynchon.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 200-F1: Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing
Donald Waters
MWF 11:30-12:30

Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student’s understanding
of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment.
  
Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M/TH 3:00-4:30/3:30-5:00

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Karen Gross
TTh 9:40-11:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rachel Cole
MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Kurt Fosso
MWF 10:20-11:20

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 208-01: Prose Writing: Creative Nonfiction
Pauls Toutonghi
MWF 12:40-1:40

Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits                                           Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.

 

ENG 279-01: Classical Backgrounds
Kurt Fosso
MWF 12:40-1:40

A study of epic, drama, and poetry from the Greek and Latin classics. Writers may include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Horace, Ovid.

Prerequisite: None; 4 semester credits

ENG 298-01: Literature and History of 20th-Century Britain
Rishona Zimring and David Campion
TTh 9:40-11:10

The literature and history of Britain throughout the 20th century. Literary study may focus on, but is not limited to, the Bloomsbury Group, the War Poets (World War I), Evelyn Waugh, George Orwell, Philip Larkin, Salman Rushdie, Alice Oswald, Ian McEwan, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Angela Carter, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. Historical topics will include the First World War; interwar politics, society, and class dynamics; British involvement in the Spanish Civil War; British society in the Second World War; building the welfare state; postwar decolonization and immigration; popular culture in the 1960s and ’70s; Thatcherism; and multicultural British society going into the 21st century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 310-10: Medieval Literature
Karen Gross
TTh 11:30-1:00

Study of the literature and culture of the European Middle Ages, with an emphasis on England. Topics vary, but may include romance and epic; travel, including for trade, pilgrimage, and crusade; saints, devotional life, and mysticism; Jewish/Christian/Muslim interactions; human/animal relations; chivalry and humanism; autobiography and the self; the political,
social, and religious contexts that affected the emergence of English as a literary language. English readings may include “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” “Pearl,” William Langland’s “Piers Plowman,” Margery Kempe’s “Book,” Julian of Norwich’s “Revelations,” the “Cloud of Unknowing,” “St. Erkenwald,” “Sir Orfeo,” “Mandeville’s Travels,” the “Croxton Play of the
Sacrament,” and the poetry of Robert Henryson, as well as poems and plays by anonymous writers in Old and Middle English. Readings will be in the original and translation.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 318-01: Modern Poetry
Jerry Harp
TTh 1:50-3:20

Significant modern British and American figures and more recent poets. May include Owen, Auden, Kavanagh, Williams, Stevens, Moore, Bishop, Roethke, Plath, Levertov.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 322-01: Post-Civil War American Literature
Kristin Fujie
MWF 1:50-2:50

American literature as it reflects cultural and historical events such as reconstruction, industrialization, Western expansion, the women’s rights movement. Aesthetic issues such as the rise of realism and naturalism. Cather, Chesnutt, Chopin, Crane, Douglass, Dreiser, DuBois, James, Jewett, Melville, Norris, Twain, Wharton.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 332-01: Shakespeare: Later Works
Lyell Asher
MWF 1:50-2:50

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for MeasureKing LearMacbethCoriolanusAntony and CleopatraThe Winter’s TaleThe Tempest.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 333-01: Dickinson and Whitman
Rachel Cole
MWF 9:10-10:10

The works of Emily Dickinson and Walt Whitman, the two most famous poets of the American nineteenth century, could not be more different. Dickinson’s verses are acute and abstract, Whitman’s effusive and full of references to the body and the material world. In this course we will read extensively in each poet’s challenging corpus to grasp the logics as well as the mechanics of their linguistic experiments. We will discuss their engagements with genre (the lyric, the letter, the fascicle, the book), with the political issues of their time (from nationalism and civil strife to the role of women to problems of racial, ethnic, and economic exclusion), and with more general topics (sex, death). Finally, we will trace their legacies in the work of poets who followed them.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


 

ENG 333-02: William Blake
Kurt Fosso
MW 3:00-4:30

Radical, visionary, poet, painter, engraver, prophet—William Blake (1757-1827) was all these things.  Believing that liberation would come only by unlocking the “mind-forg’d manacles” of perception and reason, Blake composed art to reveal and challenge the central ideas of his age.  This course will focus on seven of his most intriguing and accessible “illuminated” works (texts and designs) composed between 1789 and 1804, including Songs of Innocence, The Marriage of Heaven and Hell, The Book of Urizen, andhis epic Milton, a Poem.  Prepare to have your “doors of perception” opened to a “World of imagination and Vision.”

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 334-01: Montaigne and the Meaning of Modern Life
Lyell Asher
MWF 11:30-12:30

No one speaks to us more directly, intimately, and profoundly than Michel de Montaigne. To read him is to have a conversation with a wiser, freer, more imaginative version of oneself. In this course we’ll be asking what Montaigne and his intellectual heirs can help us understand about our own lives and the lives of others: the reach of habit, the quest for certainty and transcendence, the meaning of friendship and love, the lessons of sex and death, and how, in Montaigne’s words, we might “enjoy our being rightfully.” If you’ve been told by older adults that this is the best time of your life, and shuddered at the thought—Montaigne is for you. In addition to the complete Essays of 1595, our reading will include works by Emerson, Stephen Toulmin, Sarah Bakewell, Richard Rorty, and Adam Phillips. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.
 

ENG 401-01: Advanced Poetry Writing
Mary Szybist
MW 3:00-4:30

An opportunity for experienced student writers to develop their skills as poets and to work on a sustained project. A workshop in which at least half of class time will be spent discussing student writing, with an emphasis on revision. Work will include the examination of literary models.

Prerequisite: ENG 301; 4 semester credits                                                   Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 402-01: Advanced Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi
TTh 11:30-1:00

Students complete a long project (a collection of short stories, a novella or the beginning of a novel, or some combination thereof). Workshop format plus additional reading as needed.

Prerequisite: ENG 200 and ENG 300, 4 semester credits                             Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.