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Fall Courses

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.


 

FALL 2015 COURSES

 

ENG 100-01 Films Adapting Fiction
Michael Mirabile
MWF 12:40pm-1:40pm

This course will examine major fictions of the twentieth century and their adaptation or transference to the medium of the cinema.  Reading fictions and watching films, moving from page to screen, we will ask the comparative question of how the conditions of each art form determine the meanings and cultural resonances of individual narratives and adaptations.  We will consider how various theories of literature and film, along with general frameworks of genre, modernism, and postmodernism, offer diverse perspectives on our course materials.  Film genres addressed include: film noir, war films, biography, thrillers, horror films, and science-fiction films. 

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 100-02 Reading and Writing the Outdoors
Don Waters
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm

This class will look closely at real and fictional landscapes and the strategies some of our best writers use to tell stories set in the outdoors. Fictional characters do not exist in a vacuum; they interact with environments. When writers decide to set stories outside, what tools must they use? What does an “outdoors” story demand? As readers, we talk a lot about characters, but what happens when a writer turns her eye on mountains and woodlands and boondock places? How do they make these places fully realized, layered, and believable? In this course we’ll explore these topics and the ways in which different environments influence the atmosphere, plot, conflict, meaning, symbolism, and tone in fiction and nonfiction. In our attempt to better understand these questions, we’ll read from a wide selection of writers, including Paul Bowles, Annie Proulx, Ben Fountain, Edward Abbey, Joy Williams, Mark Twain, Rick Bass, and many others. Students will also try their hands at mustering the elements by creating their own lively story worlds.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 100-03 King Arthur through the Ages
Karen Gross
MWF 9:10am-10:10am

This course traces the myth of King Arthur and Camelot, from their sketchy origins in Latin chronicles and Celtic legend to the fanciful reinventions in media as diverse as poetry, opera, painting, film, and graphic novel. The first half of the semester will survey the medieval accounts of King Arthur, examining the points at which different elements adhere to the simple skeleton: courtly love, the Grail Quest, the dissolution of the Round Table. The second part of the semester continues following the evolution of Arthur and asks why this cluster of stories should appeal so strongly to diverse audiences over such widely disparate time periods.  Readings include Geoffrey of Monmouth, Chrétien de Troyes, Sir Thomas Malory, Edmund Spenser, Henry Purcell & John Dryden, William Morris, Mark Twain, T.H. White, Monty Python, and Kazuo Ishiguro.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 200 Intro to Fiction and Fiction Writing
Don Waters
M 3:00-4:30pm/TH 3:30-5:00pm

Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student’s understanding of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required

 

ENG 201 Intro to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 205-01 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Lyell Asher
TTH 9:40am-11:10am

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).

 

ENG 205-02 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Karen Gross
MWF 1:50-2:50

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).

 

ENG 205-03 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Jerry Harp
MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).


ENG 298 Law and Literature

Andrea Hibbard
MWF 1:50pm-2:50pm

Students will bring legal cases and constructs to bear on an understanding of fiction, using methods of literary interpretation and theories of narrative to construe legal documents and trials. Readings and discussions will compare legal and literary responses to issues of property, inheritance, theft, copyright, and empire in 19th-century England. Authors may include Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, George Eliot, Anthony Trollope, and Wilkie Collins.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent required.


ENG 300 Fiction Writing
Don Waters
TTH 11:30am-1:00pm

Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors’ texts. Daily exercises in various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers’ work and participate in oral critique.

Prerequisites: ENG 200 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 301:  Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
M 3:00-4:30/TH 3:30-5:00

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.



Prerequisites: ENG 201 or consent of instructor.

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 316 20th Century British Lit.-Early
Rishona Zimring
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm

Major British and Irish writers of the first part of this century whose responses to such major events as World War I shape the conventions of 20th century British literature, in particular modernism. Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Rhys, Ford, Mansfield. 

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 321 Pre-Civil War American Lit. 
Rachel Cole
TTH 9:40am-11:10am

American literature in the decades preceding the Civil War. Texts include transcendentalist essays (Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau); adventure, romance, and protest novels (Hawthorne, Poe, Sedgwick, Stowe); short stories (Davis, Melville); poems (Dickinson, Whitman); and a slave narrative (Douglass). Topics include literary contributions to contemporary debates over religion, national expansion, national identity, slavery, and the rise of women and labor; the influence on those contributions of Puritanism and other early-American ideologies in combination with British Romanticism and 18th- and 19th-century philosophy; variant literary articulations of concepts that remain current in American discourse (the individual, freedom, law, the family, opportunity, happiness). 

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

ENG 330 Chaucer
Karen Gross
MW 3:00-4:30PM

The poetry of Chaucer in its literary, historical, social, and religious contexts. Topics may include the relationship between the sacred and the profane, the representations of men and women in 14th-century English society, the rise of the vernacular in the later Middle Ages, medieval attitudes towards poetry and authorship, the influence of continental European literary forms on English traditions, manuscript culture and ways of reading and writing before the advent of printing, the characteristics of different medieval literary genres, and the critical reception of Chaucer. Readings, predominantly from The Canterbury Tales, are in Middle English.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 332 Shakespeare: Later Works
Lyell Asher
TTH 11:30am-1:00pm

Critical readings of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, romances. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry from 1604 to 1611, typically including Measure for Measure, King Lear, Macbeth, Coriolanus, Antony and Cleopatra, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest

Prerequisites: None

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 333 Major Figures: William Faulkner
Kristin Fujie
MWF 10:20am-11:20am

In this course we will immerse ourselves in the diverse body of work that the American writer William Faulkner produced during his roughly forty-year career.  The core of our readings will be drawn from the major period of the late 1920s and 1930s, during which Faulkner mapped and explored his fictional southern landscape of Yoknapatawpha County, and produced such celebrated novels as The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), Light in August (1932), and Absalom, Absalom! (1936).  We will also complement the study of this period with material drawn from elsewhere in his work.  Before he became a novelist, Faulkner experimented with the graphic arts, poetry, and drama.  He wrote short stories throughout his career, dabbled in popular fiction genres, and even worked as a Hollywood screenwriter.  While we won’t be able to explore all these facets of Faulkner’s life and work, we will approach the major novels with an eye toward the larger arc of his development and the broader spectrum of his creative output. 

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.



ENG 450-01 American Nabokov
William Pritchard
MWF 11:30am-12:30pm

In Watzek Library, the works of Vladimir Nabokov are shelved in two places: PG 3476 for the works he wrote in Russian and PS 3527 for those he published after immigrating to the USA in 1940. In this seminar we will focus on the works of the American Nabokov. We will read the first four novels he wrote in America – Bend Sinister (1947), Lolita (1955), Pnin (1957) and Pale Fire (1962) – along with his memoir, Speak, Memory (1951, revised 1967), a selection of his short stories and a few of his essays and lectures. We will stop short of the forbidding Ada (1969).

From this sampling of his works, we will aspire to an understanding and appreciation of this playful, difficult, literate, lyrical, maddening author. Or, as Nabokov put it in a lecture on “Good Readers and Good Writers,” we will “try to grasp the individual magic of his genius … With a pleasure which is both sensual and intellectual we shall watch the artist build his castle of cards and watch the castle of cards become a castle of beautiful steel and glass.”

As a tangible expression of this sensual and intellectual pleasure, each student will produce a seminar paper that is approximately 20-25 pages long and that draws on primary and secondary sources (i.e., the writings of Nabokov and those of Nabokov scholars).

Prerequisites: 
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.


ENG 450-02 World Literature in Dialogue
Rishona Zimring
TTH 9:40am-11:10am

This seminar will study the ways in which 20th- and 21st-century literary works engage with earlier ones across lines of nationality, culture, race, class, gender, and even language. We will discuss three main pairs in which the later one reworks its predecessor. We begin with Shakespeare’s Othello and Tayeb Salih’s Season of Migration to the North, originally published in Arabic in 1966, and published in English in 1969. Next, we turn to Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre and Rhys’s 1966 Wide Sargasso Sea. Finally, we consider Zadie Smith’s 2005 homage to E.M. Forster’s Howards End. Critical and theoretical readings will address topics such as postcolonial authorship, literary “resonance,” “influence,” “distant reading,” and “metamodernism.” Students will read and discuss the pairings and how the texts work against and with each other. Research papers will allow students to deepen their understanding of these interactions, and to explore further the literary and cultural complexity of the common readings, the critical debates about these texts, and other writings by each author.

Prerequisites:
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.

ENG 450-03 Literature of American Slavery
Rachel Cole
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm

This seminar will focus on American slave narratives, both fictional and non-fictional, from the mid-nineteenth century and the late twentieth.  Primary-source texts will include Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave (1845); Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, by Harriet Jacobs (1861); Uncle Tom’s Cabin, by Harriet Beecher Stowe (1852); Clotel; or, The President’s Daughter, by William Wells Brown (1853); The Confessions of Nat Turner, by William Styron (1967); and Beloved, by Toni Morrison (1987).

Each student will pursue an independent project of his or her own design,  culminating in a 20-page seminar paper which contributes to the ongoing critical conversation about the literature of American slavery. Preparatory assignments will include an annotated bibliography, topic proposal, abstract, etc. In the final days of the semester we will hold a workshop, in which students present their projects to and receive feedback from the class.

Prerequisites:
Restrictions: Senior standing or consent required.


* Please click on the Senior Seminar tab under the Courses section of this website to view ENG 450 registration information.