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Fall Courses

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.



ENG 100-01 Films Adapting Fiction
Michael Mirabile
MWF 12:40pm-1:40pm
JRHH 244

This course will examine major fictions of the twentieth century and their adaptation or transference to the medium of the cinema. Reading fictions and watching films, moving from page to screen, we will ask the comparative question of how the specific conditions of each art form determine the meanings and cultural resonances of individual narratives and adaptations. We will consider how various theories of literature and film, along with general frameworks of genre, modernism, and postmodernism, offer diverse perspectives on our course materials. Particular attention over the semester will be devoted to the influence of avant-garde and New Wave film-making techniques on the cinema of the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 100-02 Literary Representations of Childhood
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 9:10am-10:10am
JRHH 244

This course traces the development of Anglo-American literary conceptions of the child from William Blake to the present. Although much of our focus will be on the years leading up to and including the so-called “golden age” of children’s literature (from about 1860 to 1920), we will begin the semester by considering how and why important Romantic poets idealized childhood. We will go on to explore the significance of Victorian fictional and non-fictional writings about exploited child workers, lonely orphans, and dying invalids. How did Victorian authors use these children to challenge the social and economic status quo and to satisfy the sentimental tastes of adult readers? We will also examine popular child heroes of adventure narratives, ghost stories, and fairytales. What is the allure of texts that figure the child as the uncivilized or wild “other”? How did these fictions both teach and transgress gender roles? The semester will end with a selection of recent works that seek to express the perspective of children caught in the crossfire of adult struggles over race, religion, and land. Authors include William Blake, Lewis Carroll, Charles Dickens, and Mark Twain. Frances Hodgson Burnett, Maurice Sendak, Opal Whiteley, Henry James, Dinah Craik, Toni Morrison, Marjane Satrapi, and Dave Eggers.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 100-03 American Folk
Megan Pugh
MWF 8:00am-9:00am
Miller 206

This class will explore the intersections of American art and the American folk. We’ll start the semester with an examination of late-nineteenth century folklore collecting and local color fiction, and will end by discussing the folk revival during the Cold War. But our primary focus will be the nineteen-twenties and thirties, when a rash of artists turned to folk sources with various aims: to right social wrongs, to find a wellspring of formal innovation, and to discover what could seem like the roots of a nation in flux. Some of these artists were, themselves, members of “the folk”: ethnic minorities and working class artists who were mounting representations of their own cultures more visibly than ever before. Our approach will be interdisciplinary. In addition to reading fiction and poetry, we’ll turn to photography, music, dance, and cultural criticism. Together, we’ll discuss issues of form and tradition; of cultural ownership, borrowing, imitation and assimilation; and of race, class, gender and nation. We’ll look at works by James Agee, George Washington Cable, Charles Chesnutt, Pietro di Dinato, Bob Dylan, Duke Ellington, Woody Guthrie, Joel Chandler Harris, Langston Hughes, Zora Neale Hurston, Lorine Niedecker, Charles Reznikoff, Constance Rourke, Muriel Rukeyser and Charles Sheeler.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 200-01 Intro to Short Story
Pauls Toutonghi
TTH 8:00am-9:30am
JRHH 253

Elements of fiction such as plot, character development, descriptive language, and voice. Emphasis on craft-based exercise. Extensive reading of short stories, culminating in the writing and revision of a final story.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required

ENG 200-02 Intro to Short Story
Pauls Toutonghi
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm
JRHH 243

Elements of fiction such as plot, character development, descriptive language, and voice. Emphasis on craft-based exercise. Extensive reading of short stories, culminating in the writing and revision of a final story.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required

 

ENG 201 Intro to Poetry/Poetry Writing
Megan Pugh
MW 3:00pm-4:30pm
JRHH 133

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 205-01 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Jerry Harp
TTH   1:50pm-3:20pm
Miller 305

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).

 

ENG 205-02 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Karen Gross
MWF 10:20am-11:20am
JRHH 242

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).

 

ENG 205-03 Major Periods/Issues English Literature
Will Pritchard
MWF 11:30am-12:30pm
Miller 305

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor required. (open to first years with 4 or 5 in AP-English).

 

ENG 208 Prose Writing: Creative Non-Fiction
Cheston Knapp
MW 4:30pm-6:00pm
Miller 414

Writing in the genre known variously as the personal essay or narrative, memoir, autobiography, to introduce students to traditional and contemporary voices in this genre. Daily writing and weekly reading of exemplars such as Seneca, Plutarch, Montaigne, Hazlitt, Woolf, Soyinka, Baldwin, Walker, Hampl, Dillard, Selzer, Lopez.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of the instructor.

 

ENG 209 Introduction to American Literature
Rachel Cole
TTH 1:50-3:20
JRHH 205

Survey of major periods and issues in American literature, from the PUrtian theocracy and early Republican period through American Romanticism and Modernism.  Authors may include Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Cather, Williams, Faulkner, Wright, Ellison.

Prerequisites: None

 

ENG 279 Classical Backgrounds
Kurt Fosso
MWF 12:40pm-1:40pm
Miller 305

A study of epic, drama, and poetry from the Greek and Latin classics. Writers may include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Virgil, Horace, Ovid.

Prerequisites: None
Restrictions: Sophomore standing or consent of instructor.


ENG 300 Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi
TTH 9:40am-11:10am
JRHH 258

Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors’ texts. Daily exercises in various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers’ work and participate in oral critique.

Prerequisites: ENG 200 or consent of instructor.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 301:  Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
TTH 11:30am-1:00pm
Miller 210

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.



Prerequisites: ENG 201 or consent of instructor.

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 319 Postcolonial Literature
Rishona Zimring
TTH 1:50pm-3:20pm
JRHH 242

Post-World War II literary works and essays exploring the literary and cultural issues raised by the collapse of the colonial world order. Western travel and primitivism; decolonization and national allegories; authenticity and the invention of tradition; immigration dreams; constructions of race; women and the nation; adolescence and the novel of education. Rhys, Rushdie, Emecheta, Coetzee, Achebe, Ghosh.

Prerequisites None
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

 

ENG 320 Early American Literature
Rachel Cole
MWF 10:20am-11:20am
Miller 305

American literature in English from exploration and colonization through the beginning of the 19th century. Texts include autobiographies, sermons, captivity narratives, essays, poems, and novels. Topics include contemporary literary definitions of America (as land, a set of colonies, a nation, a culture, an ideology); the definition of American literature (What are our criteria of inclusion? How are those criteria conditioned by the structure of academic discourse?); how literature of the period imagines the relationships between European and indigenous populations; how it imagines the relationship of America to Europe; how it reflects variant ideologies (both religious and secular) within the colonies and later the republic; the significance of the tensions between these ideologies for concepts that remain current in American discourse today (the individual, the new world, freedom, agency, the frontier).

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 323 Modern American Lit: 1900 to WWII
Staff
MWF 12:40pm-1:40pm
JRHH 242

American literature in the first half of the 20th century as it is shaped by American writers’ growing familiarity with European modernism, with the failure of Victorian values exposed by World War I, and with the increasing presence of women and minority writers. Anderson, Cather, Dos Pasos, Faulkner, Fitgerald, Hemingway, Hurston, LeSueur, Stein, Steinbeck, Toomer, West, Wright.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent of instructor required.

 

ENG 330 Chaucer
Karen Gross
MWF 9:10am-10:10am
JRHH 242

The poetry of Chaucer in its literary, historical, social, and religious contexts. Topics may include the relationship between the sacred and the profane, the representations of men and women in 14th-century English society, the rise of the vernacular in the later Middle Ages, medieval attitudes towards poetry and authorship, the influence of continental European literary forms on English traditions, manuscript culture and ways of reading and writing before the advent of printing, the characteristics of different medieval literary genres, and the critical reception of Chaucer. Readings, predominantly from The Canterbury Tales, are in Middle English.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 333-01:  Major Figures: Milton
Jerry Harp
MWF 1:50pm-2:50pm
JRHH 101

Detailed examination of writers introduced in other courses. Figures have included Austen, Blake, the Brontes, Ellison, Faulkner, Hemingway, Joyce, Woolf. May be repeated for credit with a change of topic; however, registration for subsequent sections must be done via the registrar’s office.

Prerequisites: None.
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 333-02:  Major Figures: Blake
Kurt Fosso
MW 3:00pm-4:30pm
Miller 210

William Blake (1757-1827) was a radical, visionary, poet, painter, engraver, and prophet.  He believed that liberation could come only by unlocking the “mind-forg’d manacles” of perception (‘yer reason’).  Awakening the sleeping Albion that was his England, Blake composed art to reveal and challenge the central ideas and structures of his age.

Prerequisites: None

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


* Please click on the Senior Seminar tab under the Courses section of this website to view Eng 450 registration information and course descriptions.