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Fall Courses

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

 


 

FALL 2017 

 

ENG 100-01: Topics: Film as Literature
Michael Mirabile                                                                                             MWF 12:40-1:40

This course is designed to provide skills useful for the close analysis of films and works of modern literature.  Establishing parallels between literary and cinematic arts, we will reflect on the adaptation by film directors and screenwriters of works of fiction; the transition from page to screen.  The different perspectives we bring to discussions and written assignments will correspond, in turn, to major critical methods that influence disciplines across the humanities and social sciences: semiotics, psychoanalysis, feminism, cultural studies, and deconstruction.  Among the recurring topics that we will address over the length of the semester are genre, representation, readership / spectatorship, narrative, and differences between the Hollywood of the studio system era and the “New Hollywood” of the 1970s.    

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 200-01: Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi

MWF 10:20-11:20

Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student’s understanding of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 200-02: Introduction to Fiction and Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi

MWF 12:40-1:40

Class offers focused, writing-based exercises, coupled with careful reading of different types of fiction, to help build a student’s understanding of the fictional form. Creative work is produced and read in a workshop-based environment. 

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 201-01: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp

TTH 1:50-3:20

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-01: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Will Pritchard                                                                                                   MWF 9:10-10:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 205-02: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature                    Lyell Asher                                                                                                  TTh 9:40-11:10

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature from Middle Ages to end of 17th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 206-01: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature              
      Rishona Zimring                                                                                              MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Romantic period to middle of 20th century. Enrollment preference given to English majors and minors.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 209-F1: Introduction to American Literature
Kristin Fujie
MWF 11:30-12:30

Survey of major periods and issues in American literature, from the Puritan theocracy and early Republican period through American Romanticism and Modernism. Authors may include Edwards, Franklin, Emerson, Whitman, Dickinson, Twain, Cather, Williams, Faulkner, Wright, Ellison.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 300-01: Fiction Writing
Pauls Toutonghi

TTh 9:40-11:10

Discussion and small-group workshop. Required reading aloud from an anthology, with student-led discussion of authors’ texts. Daily exercises in various elements of short fiction, graduating to full-length stories; emphasis on revision. All students write evaluations of peers’ work and participate in oral critique.

Prerequisites: ENG 200; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 301-01: Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp

M 3:00-4:30/Th 3:30-5:00

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.



Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 313-01: Restoration and 18th-Century Literature
Will Pritchard
MWF 11:30-12:30

An introduction to British literature written between 1660 and 1800 (i.e., between John Milton and Jane Austen). Covers the full range of the period’s genres, except for the novel, and includes many of the period’s major authors (John Bunyan, John Dryden, Aphra Behn, William Congreve,
Jonathan Swift, Alexander Pope, John Gay, Thomas Gray, Samuel Johnson). Topics include the tension between Puritanism and Libertinism, the relation of 18th-century authors to their classical forbears, the contrast between country and city, and the growth of England’s empire.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 315-01: The Victorians: Heroes, Decadents, and Madwomen
Andrea Hibbard

MWF 1:50-2:50

Study of the literature and culture of the Victorian period (1837-1901). Juxtaposes fictional and nonfictional depictions of urbanization and class conflict; considers how the information explosion, industrial revolution, and resulting commodity culture created new anxieties about the meaning of art; examines tensions between Darwinian scientific theory and religious faith; explores the gender politics of Victorian sensation fiction and children’s fiction; and investigates how imperial expansion informed the literature of the period. Authors may include Charles Dickens, the Brontes, Robert and Elizabeth Browning, Wilkie Collins, Matthew Arnold, Lewis Carroll, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Christina Rossetti, George Eliot, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Oscar Wilde.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 316-01: 20th-Century British Literature, Early
Rishona Zimring

MW 3:00-4:30

Major British and Irish writers of the first part of this century whose responses to such major events as World War I shape the conventions of 20th-century British literature, in particular modernism. Conrad, Yeats, Woolf, Joyce, Lawrence, Forster, Eliot, Auden, Rhys, Ford, Mansfield.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 321-01: Pre-Civil War American Literature
Rachel Cole

TTh 1:50-3:20

American literature in the decades preceding the Civil War. Texts include transcendentalist essays (Emerson, Fuller, Thoreau); adventure, romance, and protest novels (Hawthorne, Poe, Sedgwick, Stowe); short stories (Davis, Melville); poems (Dickinson, Whitman); and a slave narrative (Douglass). Topics include literary contributions to contemporary debates over religion, national expansion, national identity, slavery, and the rise of women and labor; the influence on those contributions of Puritanism and other early-American ideologies in combination with British Romanticism and 18th- and 19th-century philosophy; variant literary articulations of concepts that remain current in American discourse (the individual, freedom, law, the family, opportunity, happiness).

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 


ENG 331-01: Shakespeare: Early Works
Lyell Asher

TTh 11:30-1:00

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and tragedies. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry, typically including The Merchant of Venice, All’s Well That Ends WellTwelfth NightHenry IVHamletOthello.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 


ENG 333-01: Major Figures: William Faulkner
Kristin Fujie

TTh 11:30-1:00

In this course we will immerse ourselves in the diverse body of work that the American writer William Faulkner produced during his roughly forty-year career.  The core of our readings will be drawn from the major period of the late 1920s and 1930s, during which Faulkner mapped and explored his fictional southern landscape of Yoknapatawpha County, and produced such celebrated novels as The Sound and the Fury (1929), As I Lay Dying (1930), Light in August (1932), and Absalom, Absalom! (1936).  We will also complement the study of this period with material drawn from elsewhere in his work, particularly from his earlier writings.  Before he became a novelist, Faulkner experimented with the graphic arts, poetry, and drama.  He wrote short stories throughout his career, dabbled in popular fiction genres, and even worked as a Hollywood screenwriter.  While we won’t be able to explore all these facets of Faulkner’s life and work, we will approach the major novels with an eye toward the larger arc of his development and the broader spectrum of his creative output.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 


ENG 340-01: How To Do Things With Meaning - Structuralist and Poststructuralist Literary Theory and Criticism
Kurt Fosso

TTh 9:40-11:10

A general introduction to the major movements in “theory” since the 1960s: structuralism, post-structuralism (including deconstruction and French feminisms), new historicism, and cultural studies.  Along the way we’ll also consider an issue fundamental to literary theory, to our reading, and to most every teacher’s approaches to interpretation: the production of “meaning” in texts and its relation to structure, power, ethics, and pleasure.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 

Please view the Senior Seminar tab on this website for ENG 450 course titles, descriptions, and registration information.