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Fall Courses

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PLEASE NOTE THAT COURSE AVAILABILITY AND TIMES CHANGE FREQUENTLY. CHECK BACK OFTEN FOR UPDATES.  IN THE CASE OF DISCREPANCIES, WEBADVISOR ALWAYS TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER SCHEDULES POSTED ON THIS WEBSITE.

 


 

FALL 2018 

 

ENG 100-01: Topics in Literature:  Adventure!
Andrea Hibbard 
MWF 9:10-10:10

How are adventure and storytelling related? This class surveys some of the forms that adventure takes in literature and film, from picaresque novels to travel journals, from fairy tales to detective stories, from quest narratives to road trips, and from action movies to social thrillers. Adventure heroes and heroines light out, court danger, and endure hardship in search of treasure, excitement, and self-knowledge. How do these texts imagine nature and construct “the wild”? What do they suggest about the adult stakes in childhood? How do they represent empire and the “other”? Is the myth of male flight available to girls and women? What anxieties do adventure narratives express and what fantasies do they satisfy? Authors may include Meriwether Lewis, Isabella Bird, Lewis Carroll, Robert Louis Stevenson, Joseph Conrad, Eli Clare, Jeanette Winterson, Marilynne Robinson, John Krakauer, Cormac McCarthy, Tomi Adeyemi, and others.                                                                                                                                                     

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

ENG 100-02: Topics in Literature:  Films Adapting Fiction
Michael Mirabile
MWF 12:40-1:40     

Films Adapting Fictions: This course is designed to provide skills useful for the close reading and analysis of films and works of modern literature. Establishing parallels between literary and cinematic arts, we will reflect on the adaptation by film directors and screenwriters of works of fiction: the movement or transition from page to screen. We will also examine how models of criticism are shaped by formal features integral to the art of the cinema (cinematography, editing, performance, special effects, etc.). Among the recurring topics that we will address over the length of the semester are: genre, spectatorship, gender, narrative, and identification. A central aim of the course is to specify the conventions of several literary and cinematic genres: the thriller, crime fiction and film noir, the Gothic or horror story, and science fiction.                                                                      

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 200-F1: Fiction Writing 1
Pauls Toutonghi
MWF 10:20-11:20

The first in a sequence, this class studies the work of 25 contemporary fiction writers. These stories pair with weekly craft exercises, which consider story writing through the lens of scene structure, subtext in dialogue, and a variety of other viewpoints. By semester’s end, students
write and revise a complete short story.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 200-F2: Fiction Writing 1
Pauls Toutonghi
MWF 11:30-12:30

The first in a sequence, this class studies the work of 25 contemporary fiction writers. These stories pair with weekly craft exercises, which consider story writing through the lens of scene structure, subtext in dialogue, and a variety of other viewpoints. By semester’s end, students write and revise a complete short story.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 201-F1: Introduction to Poetry and Poetry Writing
Jerry Harp
T/TH 1:50-3:20

Elements of poetry such as imagery, rhythm, tone. Practice in the craft. Frequent references to earlier poets.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

ENG 205-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
 Lyell Asher 
TTh 9:40-11:10 
                                                                                               

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 205-F2: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
William Pritchard 
MWF 9:10-10:10                                                                                        

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of English literature. Middle Ages to the end of the 18th century.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 206-F1: Major Periods and Issues in English Literature
Rishona Zimring 
MWF 12:40-1:40

Introduction to ways of reading and writing about literature; historical development of literature in English. Romantic period to the present.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits


ENG 209-F1: Introduction to American Literature
Rachel Cole
TTh 9:40-11:10

Selective survey of American literature in English from the colonial period through the present. We will discuss the development of peculiarly American ideas, questions, genres, and styles, as well as the ways they have changed through time. We will also consider what it means to categorize literary works by nation in the first place; i.e., what is at stake in the concept of a national literary tradition.


Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

ENG 240-F1: The Brontes
Andrea Hibbard
MWF 11:30-12:30

Exploration of the mythology that has attached itself to Charlotte, Emily, and Anne Bronte, including how they simultaneously contributed to and distanced themselves from mid-Victorian literary culture, as well as negotiated cultural expectations and anxieties about the growing feminization of the novel. Includes reading of their novels, letters, journal entries, poems, and juvenilia.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits

 

ENG 300-01: Fiction Writing 2
 Pauls Toutonghi
MWF 12:40-1:40

The second in a sequence, this class shifts from the reading of contemporary fiction to the emulation of these models, and students’ creation of their own work. Some exercises and free-writes are assigned, but the bulk of the course is focused on generating short stories to be workshopped by the class. The readings focus on the process of writing itself and its psychology.

Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits

Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

 

ENG 301-01: Poetry Writing
 Jerry Harp
M/TH 3-4:30/3:30-5

Discussion of student work with occasional reference to work by earlier poets. Students develop skills as writers and readers of poetry.



Prerequisites: ENG 201; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 312-01: The Early English Novel
 Will Pritchard

MWF 11:30-12:30

 

The process by which, over the course of the 18th century, the novel became Britain’s preeminent genre. Topics include the relation of novel to
romance, debates over the morality of fiction, claims of novels not to be novels, women as readers and writers, and the period’s various
subgenres (e.g., epistolary novel, gothic novel, sentimental novel). Possible authors include Aphra Behn, Daniel Defoe, Eliza Haywood, Samuel Richardson, Henry Fielding, Charlotte Lennox, Laurence Sterne, Tobias Smollett, Horace Walpole, Frances Burney, Jane Austen.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 314-01: The Romantics: Frankenstein
 Kurt Fosso

MWF 12:40-1:40

 

British writers circa 1785 to 1834, an era of “imagination” and “feeling” as well as of revolution, war, and social change. Authors may include Blake, Wordsworth, Coleridge, Austen, Keats, the Shelleys, Byron, Hemans.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.

ENG 319-01: Postcolonial Literature: Anglophone Africa, India, Caribbean
 Rishona Zimring 

MWF 10:20-11:20

 

Literary works and essays exploring the literary and cultural issues that arise from the questioning and collapse of the colonial world order. Topics include decolonization and national allegories; authenticity and the invention of tradition; constructions of race; the role of women in empire and the nation; adolescence and the novel of education; Western travel and
primitivism; violence and trauma. Authors include Chinua Achebe, Kwame Anthony Appiah, Aime Cesaire, J.M. Coetzee, Tsitsi Dangarembga, E.M.
Forster, Una Marson, Arundhati Roy, Jean Rhys, Salman Rushdie, Edward Said.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 

ENG 320-01: Inventing America
Rachel Cole 

T/Th 1:50-3:20

 

This is a course built on questions: What is America—a land, a nation, a culture, an ideology? How did people imagine America and the American experience before the U.S. was founded, or in decades immediately following its constitution? Which of these early ideas has influenced the way we live and think today? What counts as “early American” literature—Native
American tales as well as Puritan captivity narratives? How about the writings of Spanish conquistadors? What do our answers say about who
Americans are, who they (we?) were, who we would like to be moving forward, who we would like to have been all along? Texts may also include
autobiographies, sermons, essays, poems, and novels.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required.


ENG 323-01: Modern American Literature: 1900-WWII 
 Kristin Fujie 

MWF 10:20-11:20

Study of American literature between 1900 and World War II, especially the interwar years. Readings consist of short stories, novels, and poetry, supplemented by essays and manifestos. Broad topics include literary “modernism” (is it a historical period? an attitude? a style?); American modernism’s relationship to European modernism and 19th-century realism; “stay-at-home” modernism vs. “expat” modernism; and the place of African-American literature and the Harlem Renaissance within American modernism at large. Emphasis on formal experimentation as a response to global transformations (World War I, the first sexual revolution, technological
advancement, innovations in the visual arts) and its expression of various feelings and attitudes inspired by the perceived complexity, multiplicity, and newness of the modern world. Readings may include longer works by Cather, Sherwood Anderson, Hemingway, Djuna Barnes, Fitzgerald, Nella Larsen, Faulkner, Hurston, and Wright. Poetry by Eliot, H.D., Mina Loy,
Williams, Hughes, Toomer, Stevens, and Marianne Moore.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 


ENG 331-01: Shakespeare: Early Works
 Lyell Asher 

TTh 11:30-1:00

Critical reading of plays representative of the development of Shakespeare’s comedies, histories, and tragedies. Usually covers six or seven plays and selected poetry, typically including The Merchant of VeniceAll’s Well That Ends WellTwelfth NightHenry IVHamletOthello.

Prerequisites: None; 4 semester credits
Restrictions: Junior standing or consent required. 


Please view the Senior Seminar tab on this website for ENG 450 course titles, descriptions, and registration information.