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Asian Studies

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Full List of Asian Studies Courses
Spring 2018
AS 156 Art of Tea Culture

Jan Waldmann
Th 5:00-7:00pm
The traditional art of tea, practiced in Japan for over 400 years, and its interrelationship with Japanese culture. Study of tea masters of
the past, famous as performers of the art, arbiters of taste, and confidants of rulers. Aesthetics, philosophy, cultural and political relationships, ceramic arts, architecture, landscape design. Practice of the ritualized forms for making and drinking tea, and forms of social interaction expressed in the practice.

ART 154 Buddhist Art

Dawn Odell 
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Exploration of the artistic traditions engendered by the Buddhist faith as it originated in India and migrated to other parts of Asia. We examine the representation of Buddhist doctrine in a variety of media, including architecture, sculpture, painting, and illustrated books. In addition, we consider European and American responses to Buddhist art in the 19th and early 20th centuries.
Prerequisites: None.

ART 257 Imperial Republican China
Dawn Odell 
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
Examination of art produced during China’s last imperial dynasty and Republican era (1644-1949), with a focus on art created in four cities: Beijing, Suzhou, Guangzhou, and Shanghai. Among other topics, we consider the artistic conventions and religious beliefs of the Manchu court, the influence of European and American trade on Chinese visual culture, and the effects of new reproductive technologies, such as photography, on Chinese art.
Prerequisites: None.

AS 251 Contemporary Korean Culture
Layoung Shin
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
The course examines the historical development of contemporary social and cultural life in South Korea. Topics include popular culture, language, material culture, regional relations, religion, and colonialism.
Prerequisites: None.

AS 400 Senior Thesis: Asian Studies
Jennifer Hubbert
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
Advanced research and independent work under the guidance of faculty supervisor(s) on a topic previously explored in East Asian studies. Production of a carefully researched and reasoned thesis; distribution to convener, faculty supervisor(s), and other class members for assessment. Oral presentation of thesis; written and verbal comments from convener, faculty supervisor(s), and other students. Substantive employment of Chinese or Japanese language in research—including interviews, audiovisual materials, printed material—strongly recommended. When possible, preliminary research conducted on an overseas studies program.
Prerequisites: AS 100. ART 151, HIST 110, or RELS 242. One AS methodology course. 

CHIN 202 Intermediate Chinese II
Meiru Liu
MTWF 12:40-1:40pm
Continuing development of ability to converse, read, and write on topics of daily life and general concern in Standard Chinese. Addition of 300 characters. Introduction to reading characters in their traditional forms. Basic expository writing.
Prerequisites: CHIN 201 or equivalent. 

CHIN 252 Chinese Conversation 
Bei Bei Liu
MWF 10:20-11:20am
Vocabulary and idioms in spoken Chinese. Improving pronunciation and correcting grammar to increase students’ mastery of spoken Chinese, encourage self-confidence in using the language, and enable students to function in a Chinese environment. CHIN 251 and CHIN 252 may each be taken twice for credit or taken in sequence for a maximum of 4 credits. Credit-no credit.
Prerequisites: CHIN 201.

CHIN 320 Advanced Readings in Chinese

Meiru Liu 
MWF 1:50-2:50pm
Oral expression, listening comprehension, reading, and writing. Expository and creative writing, syntax, idiomatic usage emphasized to promote
fluency. Review and consolidation of grammar and Chinese characters from previous years, expansion of structural and idiomatic command. Increased use of Chinese dictionaries. Reading and writing in both regular and simplified characters. Short oral presentations, compositions, other exercises to build toward mastery of speaking, reading, writing. Short prose works, fiction, drama, poetry, print and video media. With consent of instructor, may be taken twice for credit.

HIST 111 Making Modern China
Susan Glosser
TTH 9:40-11:10am
The history of China from the Song to the end of the twentieth century through primary sources (art, material culture of daily life, short stories, memoirs, political propaganda, and government documents, and music). We’ll examine family, gender roles, sexuality, political and social structures, urbanization, resistance to Western imperialism, popular rebellions, World War Two, revolution, nationalism, modernization, the role of historical memory in contemporary China.
Prerequisites: None.

HIST 209 Japan at War
Andrew Bernstein
MWF 10:20-11:20am
 In-depth study of the causes, dynamics, and outcomes of the wars fought by Japan in Asia and the Pacific from the late 19th century through World War II. The trajectories of Japanese imperialism, sequence of events leading to the attack on Pearl Harbor, social impact of total war. Japan’s wartime culture as seen through diaries, newspaper articles, propaganda films, short stories, government documents. Short- and long-term effects of the atomic bomb and the American occupation of Japan.
Prerequisites: None.

HIST 217 The Emergence of Modern South Asia
David Campion
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
The social, economic, and political history of the Indian subcontinent from the 18th century to the present. The cultural foundations of Indian Society; the East India Company and the expansion of British power; the experience of Indians under the British Raj; Gandhi and the rise of Indian nationalism; independence and partition; postcolonial South Asian developments in politics, economy, and culture. Thematic emphasis on the causes and consequences of Western imperialism, religious and cultural identities, and competing historical interpretations.
Prerequisites: None.

HIST 300 Historical Materials
Andrew Bernstein
MW 3:00-4:30pm
Materials and craft of historical research. Bibliographic method; documentary editing; use of specialized libraries, manuscripts, maps, government documents, photographs, objects of material culture. Career options in history. Students work with primary sources to develop a major editing project. Topical content varies depending on instructor’s teaching field. Enrollment preference given to history majors and minors.
Prerequisites: None.

JAPN 202 Intermediate Japanese II
Satomi Newsom
MTWF 11:30-12:30pm
Continuing work on basic language skills. Oral and written exercises, mastery of more complex sentence structures, expanding vocabulary. Contemporary Japanese culture introduced in context of language learning.
Prerequisites: JAPN 201 or equivalent.

JAPN  252 Japanese Conversation
Yuka Kishiue
TTH 1:50-3:20pm
 Expansion of vocabulary and idioms, polishing pronunciation, and correcting faulty grammar through oral drills and exercises. Students improve their listening comprehension through audio and video materials and develop confidence in using the language through guided discussions based on brief readings, tapes, films, or assigned current topics. JAPN 251 and JAPN 252 may each be taken twice for credit or taken in sequence for a maximum of 4 credits. Credit-no credit.
Prerequisites: JAPN 201.

JAPN 290 Topics in Japanese Literature in Translation
M 6:00-9:00pm
Staff
English translations focusing on literary genre (poetry, prose, fiction, drama), period (medieval, premodern, modern, contemporary), and/or theme (aesthetics, storytelling, nature, community, power, gender, sexuality). Lectures, discussions, student essays, and background readings on literary, cultural, historical, philosophical, religious, social background of works studied. Topics vary from year to year. The JAPN 290 and JAPN 291 options cannot be taken simultaneously. Taught in English; no background in Japanese language or literature required. With consent of instructor, may be taken twice for credit.
Prerequisites: None. 

JAPN 320 Readings and Composition in Japanese II
Atsuko Kurogi
Continued language study based on readings that address topics of cultural interest such as education, work, family, moral and intellectual values, history, popular culture, and current social issues. Emphasis on improving students’ ability to read and write Japanese. Content varies from year to year. With consent of instructor, may be taken twice for credit.
Prerequisites: JAPN 202. JAPN 310 recommended.

JAPN 420 Advanced Readings in Japanese: Non-Fiction
Satomi Newsom
MWF 10:20-11:20am
Advanced readings in Japanese fiction and nonfiction to familiarize students with a range of literary styles. Excerpts from contemporary writers, which may include essays and short fiction from Kawabata, Murakami, Tanizaki, others. Emphasis on close reading, analytical writing, detailed discussion of the texts. Topics vary from year to year. With consent of instructor, may be taken twice for credit.
Prerequisites: JAPN 320 or equivalent.

MUP 121 Gamelan Ensemble
Mindy Johnston
Thursday 4:30-6:00pm
The performance of Central Javanese music. Concert, dance, theatrical styles. New music written for gamelan from around the world. Regional stylistic variants. Cultural matters relating to music. Public performance in
orchestral and chamber styles. May be repeated for credit.

PHIL 207 Indian Philosophy

J.M. Fritzman
MWF 10:20-11:20am
Survey of India’s classical philosophies as well as introductions to the Vedas, the Upanishads, Carvaka, Jainism, Buddhism, and recent Indian philosophers.
Prerequisites: None.

RELS 246 Religions of Japan
Jessica Starling
MWF 10:20-11:20am
 Religious traditions of Japan from the eighth century to the present examined through the thematic lenses of hagiography, asceticism, syncretism, gender, family, and cultural identity. Critical attention will be paid to the concepts of “religion” and “secular” during examination of continuities and changes from the ancient to the contemporary period. Students will conduct a semester-long research project on a topic related to Japanese religion.
Prerequisites: None.

RELS 356 Gender and Buddhism

Jessica Starling
TTH 11:30-1:00pm
Examination of women and gender in Buddhist mythology, doctrine, practice, and institutions spanning the length of the Buddhist tradition (i.e., 500 BCE to the present), addressing examples from Indian, Southeast Asian, Tibetan, and Japanese Buddhist contexts. Tension between Buddhism’s theoretical discourse on women and gender; actual roles and experiences of women in the Buddhist tradition. Topics include the founding myth of the Buddhist order of nuns and the writings of early nuns; Buddhist discourse on female impurity and the exclusion of women from sacred mountains; female tantric adepts and depictions of the feminine in Tibetan Buddhism; the movement to revive full ordination for nuns in Southeast Asia; the Buddhist feminist movement in contemporary Japan.
Prerequisites: Any 200-level RELS course.

SOAN 200 Ethnographic Research Methods
Ian Lowrie
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Exploration of the conceptual foundations of ethnographic research methods at the intersection of sociology and anthropology. Engagement with ethnographic practices including participant observation, field notes, interviewing, language analysis, and writing. Attention to ethical
dimensions of research. Consideration of the productivity and limitations of ethnographic methods in addressing diverse research topics..

SOAN 288 China in the News
Jennifer Hubbert
M 3:00-4:30, Th 3:30-5:00pm
Rarely a day goes by in the realm of contemporary American news that does not find China center stage. Whether through accolades of its avant-garde architecture, Olympic gold medals, and booming economy or critiques of its environmental practices, “neocolonialist” relationship with Africa, or domestic human rights, China has garnered an important space in the American public imaginary. China is a rapidly rising world power in an international arena witnessing the increasing economic instability and declining economic hegemony of Western nations, and its engagement in the global realm matters. We are interested in looking at China in the news in two different ways. First, this course will think topically about China as news. What is happening today in China both domestically and internationally that is worthy of international coverage? What are the historical precedents for such events and processes? How does understanding both the historical record and contemporary cultural formations help us to comprehend the significance of their current manifestation? Second, this course will think theoretically about China in the news. How is China represented in American media sources? What are the contours, influences, and ramifications of these representations? How do historical precedent and contemporary culture affect these representations? 

SOAN 321 Theory through Ethnography
Jennifer Hubbert
MW 3:00-4:30pm
This seminar-style class will focus on reading ethnographies as a means of analyzing and assessing contemporary anthropological theory; emphasis will be on reading and critical analysis of the latest works to examine the interface among the local production of knowledge, method, and global theory. Readings based on student input and will draw from regions around the world including East Asia, the United States, South America, and Europe.
Prerequisites: SOAN 100 or 110 and two 200-level SOAN courses.
Restrictions: Junior standing required.

SOAN 367 Anthology of Tourism
Kabir Heimsath
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Investigation of key themes in the study of tourism, including economic and social inequality, race, “the gaze,” authenticity, commodification of place and culture, heritage, identity, and performance. Students are encouraged to reflect on their own backgrounds in consideration of these themes. Focus on ethnographic studies of tourism in Asia. The course provides theoretical and methodological tools to imagine, design, and carry out a
required individual research project.

SOAN 398 Queer Theory in Asia
Layoung Shin
TTH 9:40-11:10am
Challenging Western-centered queer theories by critically examining the “global gay” concept in queer studies; exploring historic transformations of gender, sexuality, and queer politics in Asia through heteronormative family ideology, Confucian culture, the political and economic transformation
following the Asian economic crisis, and the development of global digital media. The course will provide students with a critical understanding of the interrelations between culture, capitalism, transnationalism, and queer theory, and offer a comparative perspective on same-sex sexualities, non-normative sexualities, and gender variance through an alternative theoretical lens. 

Asian Studies

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